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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Canadian Cooking / Toronto
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    Toronto

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    conniecooks
    Fri Aug 12, 2011 12:51 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    ~Leslie~ wrote:
    Really? Never heard of them? Wow, I thought they were known everywhere. Learn something new every day!
    I love pierogies, fried in some butter and onions, maybe a little bacon.
    My favourite is potatoe and cheese, DH loves his stuffed with cottage cheese and then a rhubarb or blueberry sauce poured over them like his Mom always made.

    I like my poutine served as the original recipe, curds and gravy yummy.gif
    But there are so many other variations to try!
    There is a place in Toronto that is supposed to be the best Poutine place around, here is the website:

    http://smokespoutinerie.com/
    Hi Leslie wave.gif gotta love that place
    TOOLBELT DIVA
    Fri Aug 12, 2011 8:24 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    ~Leslie~ wrote:
    Really? Never heard of them? Wow, I thought they were known everywhere. Learn something new every day!
    I love pierogies, fried in some butter and onions, maybe a little bacon.
    My favourite is potatoe and cheese, DH loves his stuffed with cottage cheese and then a rhubarb or blueberry sauce poured over them like his Mom always made.

    I like my poutine served as the original recipe, curds and gravy yummy.gif
    But there are so many other variations to try!
    There is a place in Toronto that is supposed to be the best Poutine place around, here is the website:

    http://smokespoutinerie.com/


    YUMMMMMM.... Pierogies, Varieniki, Pudahea (apologies to my Ukranian friends for the poor spelling of your deliciousness).... Pierogies = Polish; the other two = Ukranian and Serbian.....
    Yes, Leslie, boiled then fried in butter with onions and bacon bits. Served with gobs of sour cream.... Cholesterol city! YUMMMMMMMMM

    icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif
    John DOH
    Tue Sep 20, 2011 11:23 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Perogies are normally boiled, not fried, but thats a Western Canadian thought...its Quebeckers that want to deep fry them...

    As a "Westerner" (albeit living in SW Ontario) I still want mine stuffed with cottage cheese, or potato and onion. boiled and served with sour cream, spring onion, sauteed onion, fried bacon, sauteed mushrooms, shredded cheddar, literally with a "side" of grilled steak, pork chop or oven roasted smokey garlic sausage...

    Cabbage rolls are always a favourite. too!

    Having worked in the NWT umpteen years ago, you never ate "whale blubber", but "flipper" (seal) pie wasn't unusual; caribou and musk ox steaks were a normal offering and pretty dam' good! "Fiddleheads" and blueberries, but someone from Iceland is probably more than familiar with these!

    Cranberries are fairly unique to Canada, as is Pacific Salmon. Arctic Char, Pickerel, Yellow Perch and the like.

    We "borrow a lot" from other cultures and I doubt that any Toronto restaurants offer anything uniquely "Canadian"...you'd have to go beyond Dixie Road to get into that!

    John
    TOOLBELT DIVA
    Tue Sep 20, 2011 11:29 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    John DOH wrote:
    Perogies are normally boiled, not fried, but thats a Western Canadian thought...its Quebeckers that want to deep fry them...

    As a "Westerner" (albeit living in SW Ontario) I still want mine stuffed with cottage cheese, or potato and onion. boiled and served with sour cream, spring onion, sauteed onion, fried bacon, sauteed mushrooms, shredded cheddar, literally with a "side" of grilled steak, pork chop or oven roasted smokey garlic sausage...

    Cabbage rolls are always a favourite. too!

    Having worked in the NWT umpteen years ago, you never ate "whale blubber", but "flipper" (seal) pie wasn't unusual; caribou and musk ox steaks were a normal offering and pretty dam' good! "Fiddleheads" and blueberries, but someone from Iceland is probably more than familiar with these!

    Cranberries are fairly unique to Canada, as is Pacific Salmon. Arctic Char, Pickerel, Yellow Perch and the like.

    We "borrow a lot" from other cultures and I doubt that any Toronto restaurants offer anything uniquely "Canadian"...you'd have to go beyond Dixie Road to get into that!

    John


    My, my, an expert.
    John DOH
    Tue Sep 20, 2011 11:51 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    By no means!

    I've had the chance to travel around a bit, but I'd still like to get better aquainted with "lobster rolls" in the Maritimes (or Michael Smith cooking!), Annapolis Valley apples versus BC or Ontario....there's a lot to be tried in Quebec with the "tortier" and many, many other recipes that I've never had a decent shot at experiencing...

    Just the thought that someone from Iceland would fly into Toronto and try out a few of the local ethnic restaurants, and go home, thinking they had any "grasp" of Canadian cooking is just so "wrong".

    When I came out of the West to live in the GTA, it was explained to me that many Torontonians did not own cars, and had never been outside of that "city", and believed that "Civilization ends at Dixie Road" I was a bit puzzled, but 23 years later, I kind of getv the message...Torontonians live in a "City State", and have few if any clues of the Country that supports them.

    My opinion only, but Torontonians want to get up into different parts of Ontario, or Canada, and taste some of the "Regional" stuff and what living in those areas is like!

    John
    John DOH
    Tue Sep 20, 2011 11:58 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    (Aside from that, "Sorry for my Life" as a Canadian!)

    Admittedly, it interrupts with any Torontonian trains of thought!

    John
    TOOLBELT DIVA
    Wed Sep 21, 2011 5:23 am
    Food.com Groupie
    John DOH wrote:
    (Aside from that, "Sorry for my Life" as a Canadian!)

    Admittedly, it interrupts with any Torontonian trains of thought!

    John



    It is obvious you are a "transplant" with buiilt-in big city prejudices. What a shame. You are rippng yourself off; There is more to Toronto life than finding authentic restaurants. Toronto is a cosmopolitan, diverse city with many things to offer newcomers, and oldcomers alike. Too numerous to mention here, needless to say.... The city is here for the taking.... get out and take it.

    (Aside from that, I am not a native Torontonian, but I love this city and what it offers me as a Proud Canadian).
    John DOH
    Wed Sep 21, 2011 7:37 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    There you go!

    I live near Hamilton, and love that underated city, and the Niagara Peninsula...so call me "rustic" or "provincial", but I'd sooner be up in the wilderness of Northern Ontario than fighting smog and congestion...lots of "neat" places out in the country!

    John
    TOOLBELT DIVA
    Wed Sep 21, 2011 8:29 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    John DOH wrote:
    There you go!

    I live near Hamilton, and love that underated city, and the Niagara Peninsula...so call me "rustic" or "provincial", but I'd sooner be up in the wilderness of Northern Ontario than fighting smog and congestion...lots of "neat" places out in the country!

    John


    Great, this beautiful country needs entrepeneurs like you..... Go do your thing in Northern Ontario. I lived in Northern Ontario for many years; they have much to offer and they are waiting for you.... Take lots of face masks to protect you and your family from the smog created by mining companies. OOOPS! Forgot about that, eh John?

    PS - BTW John, Pierogies are boiled just like any ravioli, then these filled pillows are fried in bacon fat, with onions, bacon, mushrooms, etc. etc. If you don't care to fry them, so be it, but being adamant and saying pierogies are not fried, is not having an open "foodie" mind. A good chef learns from other people and cultures.
    John DOH
    Wed Sep 21, 2011 9:37 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Actually, no.

    "Northern Ontario" to me means Kenora/Dryden/even Thunder Bay...grant the pointb that TBay is doing a bit of gold mining, there's no air pollution.

    The mills were shut down years ago, and dismantled and removed, even Terrace Bay suffered this fate!

    Hearst and Kapuskasing took this kick in the gonads, while the City State of Toronto with its incompetent Mayor grabbed most of the provincial cash...but don't get into it with me...I will bury you in a single post!

    Timmins is admittedly scrambling for "scrap gold" from tailings, as is even the Cdn Mint in Ottawa, and the desperation mine in or around TBay, but I don't expect you've been around any of these places, or looked for work in any of them..."Toronto" gets to be such a safety belt in such cases!

    John

    Aside from which, you name is well picked. A "Diva" indeed!

    I was pointing out that perogies are cooked a bit differently in different parts of the country than you have experienced. None of these methods are "wrong". They are simply "regional tastes".

    Torontonians are not really "strong" on giving anyone else in the entire Nation credit for "regional tastes", but wher do I get off, having lived in what you suppose to call "West Armpit", be that in Ontario or Western Canada?

    I will gently remind you to "give your head a shake". The majority of people in Canada do not live in Toronto.

    Give it a thought.

    John
    TOOLBELT DIVA
    Thu Sep 22, 2011 6:31 am
    Food.com Groupie
    John DOH wrote:
    Actually, no.

    "Northern Ontario" to me means Kenora/Dryden/even Thunder Bay...grant the pointb that TBay is doing a bit of gold mining, there's no air pollution.

    The mills were shut down years ago, and dismantled and removed, even Terrace Bay suffered this fate!

    Hearst and Kapuskasing took this kick in the gonads, while the City State of Toronto with its incompetent Mayor grabbed most of the provincial cash...but don't get into it with me...I will bury you in a single post!

    Timmins is admittedly scrambling for "scrap gold" from tailings, as is even the Cdn Mint in Ottawa, and the desperation mine in or around TBay, but I don't expect you've been around any of these places, or looked for work in any of them..."Toronto" gets to be such a safety belt in such cases!

    John

    Aside from which, you name is well picked. A "Diva" indeed!

    I was pointing out that perogies are cooked a bit differently in different parts of the country than you have experienced. None of these methods are "wrong". They are simply "regional tastes".

    Torontonians are not really "strong" on giving anyone else in the entire Nation credit for "regional tastes", but wher do I get off, having lived in what you suppose to call "West Armpit", be that in Ontario or Western Canada?

    I will gently remind you to "give your head a shake". The majority of people in Canada do not live in Toronto.

    Give it a thought.

    John



    I don't recall saying the majority of Canadians live Toronto.....
    As anFYI, John: I was born in Saskatchewan; my ancestors from both parents emigrated from central Europe to help build a great nation.
    Can you not have an intelligent conversation without getting defensive and rude? No point in insulting people...John, this is, after all, a recipe site. Your assumptions are unfounded.
    Have a nice life, and I plan to do the same. icon_rolleyes.gif
    Dib's
    Thu Sep 22, 2011 7:31 am
    Food.com Groupie
    After living in western Mass-a huge Polish enclave, and in Alberta Canada I have had perogies both boiled as well as boiled then fried.

    My FAVORITE is the sauerkraut and bacon, boiled then fried in the bacon fat, smothered in sour cream, topped with chives followed by a long walk which will do nothing to save my arteries but oh man, what a way to go! icon_wink.gif
    UnknownChef86
    Thu Sep 22, 2011 2:18 pm
    Forum Host
    Just out of curiosity...What does any of this "posturing" have to do with the OP's question?
    Liza at Food.com
    Thu Sep 22, 2011 2:39 pm
    Food.com Staff
    Great question, UC.

    Hey Toolie (if i may : ) and John...let's take it to zmail if you two really need to continue, K?

    I don't know much, but I know I ADORE Poutine!

    Onwards!
    Molly53
    Fri Sep 23, 2011 5:33 pm
    Forum Host
    When we were in Trawna, we ate Greek. It was just wonderful!

    We also found a terrific Greek restaurant in Vancouver.

    I love Canada!
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