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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Greek Cooking / Greek Sausages
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    Greek Sausages

    Hunnyboo75
    Mon Feb 07, 2011 8:12 am
    Semi-Experienced "Sous Chef" Poster
    Can any one help? I would like to know what the best way to cook Pastourma and Loukanika sausages. I tend to have them with Gigantes, but looking for something different. Thanks.
    evelyn/athens
    Sat Feb 12, 2011 4:15 pm
    Forum Host
    Hi hunnyboo.

    I like to have pastourma in Pita Kaisareas. I'm trying to submit it as a recipe, but the database doesn't recognize pastourma as an ingredient, and won't let me. Here are the particulars:

    Pita Kaisareas

    5 sheets of filo pastry, cut in half lengthwise (thawed, if frozen)
    10 slices kaseri greek cheese (or any other gruyere-style cheese)
    10 slices pastourma (an anatolian/greek cured meat)
    10 thin slices fresh tomatoes
    olive oil (for brushing on filo)
    Sesame seeds

    Brush a baking pan with olive oil. Preheat oven to 370°F.

    Lay out the filo sheets. Brush each sheet with olive oil. Layer the cheese slices, pastourma and tomato slices at the bottom of each strip of filo, and roll each filo strip up, tucking, in sides, like an eggroll. Place filo rolls in baking pan, brush tops lightly with olive oil and sprinkle sesame seeds over.

    Bake for 25-35 minutes, or until pastries are a rich golden-brown in colour.


    As for a different way to do loukanika, I like to start off a pan of my greek potatoes (recipe available), and then, for the last 20 minutes or so of baking, add chunks of loukaniko.

    And I just added Spetzofai (Greek Sausage and Peppers) to the database. icon_biggrin.gif
    Hunnyboo75
    Sun Feb 13, 2011 8:42 am
    Semi-Experienced "Sous Chef" Poster
    Hi Evelyn, Thanks for that. It sound's delicious, can't wait to make it. icon_smile.gif
    evelyn/athens
    Sun Feb 13, 2011 12:33 pm
    Forum Host
    Hunnyboo75 wrote:
    Hi Evelyn, Thanks for that. It sound's delicious, can't wait to make it. icon_smile.gif

    you're welcome! Let me know what you think.
    Irmgard
    Tue Feb 15, 2011 9:46 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Yummy-sounding recipe, Ev, just like all of your recipes! I'm saving it to my cookbook to try when I can get some good sausage on special.
    evelyn/athens
    Wed Feb 16, 2011 1:47 am
    Forum Host
    Irmgard wrote:
    Yummy-sounding recipe, Ev, just like all of your recipes! I'm saving it to my cookbook to try when I can get some good sausage on special.

    It's not gourmet, but it's hearty and tasty. icon_wink.gif
    whitestarfish
    Thu Oct 06, 2011 3:35 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    pastırma is TURKISH


    The word pastirma is from the Turkish word "bastirma", meaning something that is pressed ( "basmak" means "to press" in Turkish). The name bastırma is from Turkish: bastırma et (pressed meat).[2] Bastırma is the gerund of the verb bastırmak (bastırmak in modern Turkish), which means "to depress, restrain". The word is used with minor variants in the various la

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Past%C4%B1rma
    AskCy
    Fri Feb 17, 2012 5:52 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    If you look at the heading for this section of Food.com you will see it says "Greek Cooking"... are you just going to keep posting "thats a turkish word" after everyones questions comments, or are you going to add something useful about Greek cooking

    Steve
    whitestarfish
    Sun Feb 19, 2012 3:15 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    i am telling the truth.....
    AskCy
    Sun Feb 19, 2012 4:18 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    To quote you and the link you have posted as evidence you don't appear to be telling the truth !

    quote you -"pastirmi is Turkish"

    and to quote the link you've posted

    "The name bastirma is from Turkish" which is a different word and is only talking about the word not the actual dish.

    it then goes on to say

    "The word pastrami, although used for a differently prepared type of meat, also goes back via Yiddish: פּאַסטראָמע (pastrómeh) to pastırma"

    so where is your truth ? It goes on to say how air dried beef in varying forms has been made in varying countries way back in the past.

    Steve
    whitestarfish
    Sun Feb 19, 2012 4:21 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    Etymology

    The name bastirma is from Turkish: bastırma et (pressed meat).[1] bastırma is the gerund of the verb bastırmak (bastırmak in modern Turkish), which means "to depress, restrain".
    AskCy
    Sun Feb 19, 2012 4:49 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    so you said but what has it got to do with this post ?

    if you look back at the original post (and all the ones other than yours) there is no mention of "pastirmi" or "bastirmi"

    the original post is asking about "Can any one help? I would like to know what the best way to cook Pastourma and Loukanika sausages. I tend to have them with Gigantes, but looking for something different. Thanks."

    There are many many words across the whole World that have similar sounds, even similar or the same items they describe.

    The dried meat origins look more like Romanian but even that is dubious as no one can say that one person in a country developed the technique alone and passed the method on to everyone else in the World. What is far more likely is many people developed the same sort of methods for preserving food stuffs in very similar ways in many countries when faced with same problems, similar climates, much the same food stuffs... none of them could really claim to be the original (nor could I see why it would be so important to them either)

    Steve
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