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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Slow Cooker & Crock-Pot Cooking / crockpot chicken recipies biased towards breasts!?
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    crockpot chicken recipies biased towards breasts!?

    Corbmonster
    Wed Oct 06, 2010 2:37 am
    Semi-Experienced "Sous Chef" Poster
    So I have a whole chicken I want to cook in crock pot. After searching I could only find 1 recipie that was for a whole chicken (not breasts). But alas, no pics, or reviews... and well... looked kinda lame...
    Corbmonster
    Wed Oct 06, 2010 2:41 am
    Semi-Experienced "Sous Chef" Poster
    nevermind... I searched "whole chicken crockpot recipies" and got quite a few hits.. But still.... The title is awesome. I wonder if I could put a frozen chicken in my crockpot......
    duonyte
    Wed Oct 06, 2010 8:37 am
    Forum Host
    I know that some people put frozen chicken parts in the crock, but i think that a whole frozen chicken would be risky - it would be at a dangerous temp for too long, potential for salmonella is just too great.

    Americans just have a strong preference for breasts - I rarely buy them, I prefer thighs. Too much tendency to go dry.
    Rainbow - Chef 536866
    Thu Oct 07, 2010 6:19 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I agree that doing a whole chicken is too risky. I did a whole capon in a microwave once, for Thanksgiving yet, and got sick. The risk is that the middle or some parts will not reach a temp high enough to really kill bacteria. A cut up chicken is better for making sure it is cooked through.

    I have roasted whole chicken breasts in my crockpot, with veggies, just like a pot roast, and it has come out great. In fact I have one to do tomorrow. Generally, when I use chicken parts I also use thighs because they have good meat and just enough fat to make the dish moist, where breast meat alone tends to dry out too much. I love chicken breasts though, too.

    I wonder if a half a chicken in an oval crockpot would work - a split chicken of relatively small size.
    Red Apple Guy
    Fri Oct 08, 2010 9:40 am
    Forum Host
    Lots and lots of folks cook frozen food in a crock pot. Chicken rarely takes 8 to 10 hours of cooking without turning into plastic - however - I don't - and for the reasons duonyte and Rainbow said. Egad, even my wife (the warden) does that. icon_eek.gif

    You all probably know this, but bacteria grows between 40F and 140F. 160 F is the safe temperature (over simplifying here, I'm sure). Even if the final product reaches 160F, portions of the food (usually near the sides of the crock pot) are in the danger zone (40 - 140F) for long periods of time. There's no telling what kind of critters can grow there. Picture fangs and horns and scorpion-like tails. I'm just afraid some species will be very hard to kill at 160F. So, I don't do that.

    Red
    Rainbow - Chef 536866
    Fri Oct 08, 2010 12:45 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I do picture things like that, having worked in a hospital for many years and seen people with things like Typhoid Fever and Salmonella, and having first hand experience too. I gotta make sure those critters are DAID! I think the Chinese have it right when they cut meat up into small pieces so they cook through better.
    Chef #259523 - Big Ruby
    Sat Oct 16, 2010 11:48 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    I've cooked whole chickens in my crockpots for years and never had any issues. Guess I've been lucky. I don't know if it makes any difference, but I always wash the poultry with soap and water before preparing it.
    Rainbow - Chef 536866
    Sat Oct 16, 2010 1:45 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    My mom taught me to always wash it inside and out. Some people also use lemon juice and that is helpful, and marinades that discourage bacterial growth.
    Red Apple Guy
    Mon Oct 18, 2010 3:20 pm
    Forum Host
    Sometime back, my wife called me into the living room to watch a Julia Childs rerun where she was cutting a chicken. We were hoping that was the show that she knicked herself (reference Sat. Night Live skip about that show). It wasn't, but one thing was clear, cross-contamination didn't really concern Julia all that much. Man, she slung that chicken all around the place. Other than wiping with a towel, there wasn't a lot of cleaning going on. Times have changed.
    RAG
    duonyte
    Mon Oct 18, 2010 5:02 pm
    Forum Host
    [quote="Chef #259523 - Big Ruby - Big Ruby"]I've cooked whole chickens in my crockpots for years and never had any issues. Guess I've been lucky. I don't know if it makes any difference, but I always wash the poultry with soap and water before preparing it.[/quote]

    A whole thawed chicken is of less concern to me than if it were frozen. I do four pound roasts in mine all the time. The original question was about frozen meat in the crockpot, and that I am a bit concerned about.
    Rainbow - Chef 536866
    Mon Oct 18, 2010 6:58 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I understand. I'm concerned about both.

    lol about Julia Childs and slinging the chicken around. That's true that the best of sanitary principles were not closely followed. I hear that's true with some of the contemporaries too, and I won't name names. One excuse has been that the time allowed is too little, especially if it's live, to spend any of the time with things like that. Also, maybe chickens led better lives back then, or people had stronger constitutions. More chickens came from small local family farms, while today we have agribusiness with things like that egg problem that affected so many states. I support local small farms.
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