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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Gluten-free Diet / Celiac Disease / Sorghum Flour....anyone have experience using it?
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    Sorghum Flour....anyone have experience using it?

    magpie diner
    Fri Sep 10, 2010 8:06 pm
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    Hi there....I picked up a small bag of this flour at the health food store recently, and tried out a roti recipe with it. It worked out pretty well, but this flour is so much different than anything I've ever used. I'm wondering what sort of things it's best to use in, because I can't see it working very well in baking (but then again, I could be wrong). Thanks!
    auzzi
    Mon Sep 13, 2010 5:18 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Lovely stuff - provides body, depth, fibre and protein both singularly in recipes as well as in GF flour blends.

    Carol Fenster seems fond of it at the moment. It is used extensively in her book "1,000 Gluten-Free Recipes"

    # Carol Fenster’s Older Flour Mix #
    1 ½ c sorghum flour
    1 ½ c potato starch or cornstarch
    1 c tapioca flour
    [for pastry= +glutinous rice flour]
    [for bread = increase potato or corn starch]

    # Carol Fenster’s New Flour Mix #
    1 ½ c sorghum flour
    1 ½ c potato starch or cornstarch or arrowroot
    1 c tapioca flour
    ½ c corn flour or almond flour or bean flour or chestnut flour

    I use her "New Flour Mix" extensively.

    http://lancaster.unl.edu/food/gf-sorghum-recipes.shtml
    http://www.twinvalleymills.com/pages/recipes.html
    http://www.sorghum.state.ne.us/publications/sorghumrecipes.htm
    Chef# 616082
    Tue Sep 14, 2010 7:30 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I have used it fairly extensively.

    It's a corn relative, so if you react to corn, you may to it as well, we do. I used it interchangably with brown rice flour. It's nutritious and delicious. It benefits from soaking overnight in water and an acid (a tablespoon of whey or buttermilk or a teaspoon of apple cider vinegar or lemon juice) as all whole grains do.
    magpie diner
    Tue Sep 14, 2010 10:09 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Thanks very much for your advice - good to know I'm onto a good thing here. And I had heard about the relationship to corn, which luckily is OK for me.

    I will try it as a sub for rice flour, and in the flour blends above, thanks for those Auzzi. This flour is not readily available here, but when I did find it, and have seen it since, the price point is better than many of the other non-traditional flours. (ie Teff flour which I'd love to try is very very spendy here).

    SWalker, that's interesting about soaking grains overnight. I'm assuming you're referring to the whole grain, is that right? (well I guess so or else you'd be soaking flour in water which can't be right). Or can it....hmmmm icon_redface.gif icon_redface.gif
    Chef# 616082
    Tue Sep 14, 2010 10:17 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I soak my whole grain flours (teff, brown rice, gluten free oat flour) in the majority of the recipes water for twenty four hours before I bake with them. It lightens them and deactivates the antinutrients they contain
    magpie diner
    Wed Sep 15, 2010 10:31 am
    Food.com Groupie
    That's so interesting, never heard of that before. So I'm guessing you measure out exactly what you need, soak it in any amount of water and then drain when ready to use?
    Chef# 616082
    Thu Sep 16, 2010 5:15 am
    Food.com Groupie
    As an example: Soaked (Sprouted) Gluten Free Multigrain Bread.

    I try to soak all of my whole grains and whole grain flours this way before using them . It's tough with recipes that don't have added liquid like; cookies and muffins. I've tried soaking the grains and flours, drying them back out in a low oven, then baking with them, with less then stellar results.

    I used to use 1 cup of sorghum and 1 cup of brown rice flour in that recipe. I like to use a variety of grains, for the different qualities and nutrition they provide. I stopped using it when we noticed we were reacting to it just like we do to corn.

    I found the best source of info about the sprouting why's and wherefore's to be the book, Nourishing Traditions. It's based on the research of Weston Price and is very thorough.
    UmmBinat
    Thu Sep 16, 2010 9:36 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Since we react to corn we found out the hard way that sorghum was related but before that we used to enjoy before the headaches began,

    Aayi's Jowar/Jolad Roti (Gluten Free Indian Flat Bread) just uses sorghum flour
    Belgian Waffles (Gluten Free) uses other flours in combination with sorghum flour
    **Jubes**
    Sun Sep 19, 2010 4:34 pm
    Forum Host
    Sorghum flour is very hard to source where I live.

    I have managed to find it in an asia/pacific grocery store in an Indian section. It's labelled as Jowar flour. The store manager has also told me that due to our Australian labelling laws and imported flours, it has to be labelled as 'best before' one year shelf life.

    Julie
    Mia in Germany
    Fri Oct 01, 2010 10:13 am
    Forum Host
    It's nearly impossible to find sorghum in Germany except as a bait for fishing icon_eek.gif icon_lol.gif

    But then I found an Ethnic Shop online which sells African food and I ordered a 5 kilogram bag of "Milo Mehl". Maybe this is interesting for German members:

    http://ethnic-shop.de/shop/product_info.php/info/p1638_Milomehl---Maschela--zur-Herstellung-von-Injera--im-5-kg-Beutel.html

    I'm not totally sure whether this is the same sorghum as the one commonly sold in the US, though.

    From my experience you can substitute sorghum with millet flour, that's what I used to do before I found the sorghum. It worked just fine.
    PaulaG
    Sun Oct 03, 2010 12:26 pm
    Forum Host
    I am lucky I guess. There is a wonderful little grocery store on the other side of town that has many gf flours and products. 45 miles away their is a wonderful co-op with tons of gf products. I use the sorghum flour quite a bit. I love the texture.
    UmmBinat
    Sun Oct 03, 2010 1:59 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    PaulaG wrote:
    I am lucky I guess. There is a wonderful little grocery store on the other side of town that has many gf flours and products. 45 miles away their is a wonderful co-op with tons of gf products. I use the sorghum flour quite a bit. I love the texture.


    Are you gf?
    PaulaG
    Sun Oct 03, 2010 5:51 pm
    Forum Host
    UmmBinat wrote:
    PaulaG wrote:
    I am lucky I guess. There is a wonderful little grocery store on the other side of town that has many gf flours and products. 45 miles away their is a wonderful co-op with tons of gf products. I use the sorghum flour quite a bit. I love the texture.


    Are you gf?


    For the past couple of months. I have worked through the denial and am now working on the diet portion.
    UmmBinat
    Sun Oct 03, 2010 10:39 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    OK I see. So are we so the majority of my posted recipes are as well.
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