Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Canning, Preserving and Dehydrating / ~ Fermentation ~ Pickles, Sauerkraut and Vegetables
    Lost? Site Map

    ~ Fermentation ~ Pickles, Sauerkraut and Vegetables

    Go to page << Previous Page  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next Page >>
    Skipper/Sy
    Mon Oct 17, 2011 5:45 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Hi,

    I made some Kosher Sour Pickles (a variation) and posted some new photos for my recipe:
    http://www.food.com/recipe/gallery_edit.php?rid=73027

    http://www.food.com/recipe/shlomos-kosher-sour-pickles-tomatoes-by-sy-73027

    Skipper/Sy
    icon_cool.gif
    Molly53
    Mon Oct 17, 2011 6:24 pm
    Forum Host


    I love them!
    reya doucette
    Mon Oct 17, 2011 8:22 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    Hey Skip. Long time! Will certainly check out the sites. Yum. I've been playing with my camera to try and take good pics. To my astonishment, for three days Orbs danced onto my lens icon_smile.gif What a beautiful sight!
    I am doing the Oprah LifeClasses these evenings.
    Will check out the pickles, need some for the winter season.
    Thanks. So good to hear from you! icon_smile.gif
    Réya
    ZenLineDancer
    Tue Oct 18, 2011 11:19 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I am still working on perfecting my pepper sauces. Last year I fermented peppers, put them through the food mill and into jars in the refrigerator. I have one jar left that is in perfect condition and taste, but: they all separated out solids to the bottom and had to be shaken up each use. They were also very thin over what I would prefer.

    This year I put 3 types of peppers on to ferment, one is Trinidad Perfume, a Habanero with no heat. I took it out today and it is like nothing I have ever tasted in my life. Bright yellow, almost a fruit tasting sauce rather than a pepper sauce. My medium hot peppers are also done and strained. But once again way to watery for texture.

    Does anyone know of anything I can do to change this? A thickening, or a reduction?
    reya doucette
    Tue Oct 18, 2011 12:15 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    if the peppers are being cooked, I only use enough liquid to less than cover the peppers, then when I "paste" them, the sauce is thick.
    Don't know why the sauce seperated, as long as the flavour was not spoiled after shaking the bottle.
    Hope this helps
    Réya
    reya doucette
    Tue Oct 18, 2011 12:17 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    If I was going to use a thickning agent, I'd use pumpkin or squash which does not take away from the texture too much, nor alter the flavour noticably.
    Skipper/Sy
    Wed Oct 19, 2011 9:37 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    reya doucette wrote:
    Hey Skip. Long time! Will certainly check out the sites. Yum. I've been playing with my camera to try and take good pics. To my astonishment, for three days Orbs danced onto my lens icon_smile.gif What a beautiful sight!
    I am doing the Oprah LifeClasses these evenings.
    Will check out the pickles, need some for the winter season.
    Thanks. So good to hear from you! icon_smile.gif
    Réya


    Thanks Molly and Reya for your comments. It is not that easy to make consistently the same sour pickles/tomatoes.. each batch is different. This time with the sour tomatoes after two weeks I needed to add more vinegar and salt. Also, I favor plum tomatoes for pickling, but it is very hard to come by in New York City.

    Happy Pickling,

    Skipper/Sy
    icon_cool.gif
    Skipper/Sy
    Sat Nov 19, 2011 9:17 am
    Food.com Groupie
    ADAMAH DILLS-

    Last weekend I went to a Peck Slip Pickle Festival held in lower Manhattan, NYC and outdoors. They had many vendors selling all sorts of pickles, sauerkraut and other pickled vegetables. After tasting many, many pickles I bought a jar of ADAMAH DILLS. They were the closest I have found at the festival that had a truly basic Kosher pickle taste. Yes, Guss Pickles was there as well, but I find their full sour pickles to salty.

    What was a little different with the ADAMAH DILLS is that they use "a traditional method of lacto-fermentation, creating a live-culture delicacy,,,"
    "Unlike vinegar based pickles you might find in your supermarket, the pickles in this jar are full of probiotic cultures, antioxidants and enzymes..." Also, Homegrown Kosher Dill Pickles made from nothing but... cucumbers, water, salt, garlic, dill and spices.
    (Above comments are on the pickle jar purchased).
    Here is a URL http://isabellafreedman.org/adamah/harvest
    They are basically an organization to made a profit of food and distribute to the needy in the community.

    The pickle jar was expensive at $9, but worth it. I would like to duplicate the recipe at home. Anyone, know about pickling pickles using probiotic cultures?

    I made up a big jar of my own sour pickles last night and used curby cucumbers, coriander spices, salt, vinegar,garlic, alum, pepper flakes...
    My basic recipe on Zaar/Food . com is:
    Shlomo's Kosher Sour Pickles/Tomatoes by Sy
    http://www.food.com/recipe/shlomos-kosher-sour-pickles-tomatoes-by-sy-73027

    However, instead of using pickling spices, I just used coriander seeds... and have made it in cooler weather for a more firm pickle. I will know how they turned out in 1 1/2+ weeks.

    Skipper/Sy
    icon_cool.gif
    reya doucette
    Sat Nov 19, 2011 9:44 am
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    Hi Skip, perhaps I need to visit NY and experience it's food culture. So much variety coming from such a vast cultural diversity.
    All we get are the bottled pickles in the store, so the point of referance is limited to the commercial in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada.
    Lots of home pickling, but the recipes are not varied.
    Can you tell me what the purpose of Fermentation with pickling serves. Some Chinese and Japanese foods use fermentation, the iddli/dosa mix of South India.
    Why the fermentation, instead of straight forward boil the liquid, pour over veg, seal bottle, mature?
    Réya
    Molly53
    Sat Nov 19, 2011 2:20 pm
    Forum Host
    @Sy: many of the books mentioned in the original post cover lactic fermentation and are available at your local library or from amazon.com.

    @Reya: there are health benefits to consuming fermented vegetables of all kinds. You can read all about it in the original post.
    Skipper/Sy
    Sat Nov 19, 2011 8:34 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Molly53 wrote:
    @Sy: many of the books mentioned in the original post cover lactic fermentation and are available at your local library or from amazon.com.

    @Reya: there are health benefits to consuming fermented vegetables of all kinds. You can read all about it in the original post.


    Thanks Molly for pointing me back to the first thread on this subject "Lactic Fermentation"... excellent information and good to re-introduce myself to the information (which I must have read a long time ago). It pretty much answers all of my questions and unknowns about this the fermentation method of pickling.

    Reya- Traditionally the Kosher Pickle is barrel cured, And for me instead of using a wooden barrel I use a big glass container... and let it sit out for 1 1/2+ weeks. I do not use any canning methods for my pickles or sour tomatoes (In reference to you comment about canning, bottling.. vs fermentation pickling, curing in brine).

    Skipper/Sy
    icon_cool.gif
    reya doucette
    Sat Nov 19, 2011 9:47 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    Thanks Skip

    My fascination with food recepies persist. It is amazing to think how it began with people eating food in their natural form - and then the tiny quantam leaps as people spread over the earth to combine local growth, inspiration to create new flavours, accidents that led to new and different. Each Country turning cooking into an elaborate cusine. All of it arriving in the melting pot of North America. Hundreds of years from now it is unimaginable what the food culture of this Northern Continent will be...food for thought icon_biggrin.gif The book Clan of The Cave Bear provided a good insight into how edible food was discovered. When something new was found, only a tiny nibble was eaten to observe reactions. If there were no bad effects, a large quantity would be sampled and so on.
    When it comes to pickling, how did vinager come about and the 'accident' that grew into the pickling process? Each country composing their own pickles. The simplest of ingredients used in Northern Europe, becoming more complex the furthure south one went - and then hit the high note in flavour once we hit the East till everything turns into Fine Art once it gets to Japan.
    reya doucette
    Sat Nov 19, 2011 9:52 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    Skip would the flavour be different between barrel and glass? There would have to be with the wood lending it's own chemestry with the pickling ingredients?
    Skipper/Sy
    Mon Nov 28, 2011 9:43 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    reya doucette wrote:
    Skip would the flavour be different between barrel and glass? There would have to be with the wood lending it's own chemestry with the pickling ingredients?


    Do not know...

    SS
    reya doucette
    Tue Nov 29, 2011 5:15 am
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    Food for thought. It would be interesting to find out. Besides flavour, I am wondering about the nutritional properties too.
    Go to page << Previous Page  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next Page >> E-mail me when someone replies to this
    Add this to My Favorite Topics
    Alert us of inappropriate posts

    Free Weekly Newsletter

    Get the latest recipes and tips delivered right to your inbox.

    Your e-mail is safe. Privacy Policy
    Advertisement

    Ideas from Food.com

    Powered by phpBB 2.0.1 © 2002 phpBB Group

    Over 475,000 Recipes

    Food.com Network of Sites