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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Breads & Baking / Baking with Wild Yeast Sourdough Starters--IV
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    Baking with Wild Yeast Sourdough Starters--IV

    Go to page 1, 2, 3 ... 23, 24, 25  Next Page >>
    Donna M.
    Fri Aug 27, 2010 9:35 pm
    Forum Host
    This is a continuation of Baking with Wild Yeast Starters--I, II, & III. A new thread was started because the original was getting too lengthy. You can view the original threads here:

    Part I
    Part II


    Wild yeasts are microfungi. There are hundreds of different species, each having its own unique characteristics. Yeast fermentation produces carbon dioxide, which leavens dough. The fermentation produces beneficial bacteria, called lactobacilli, which is what creates the sourdough flavor. It takes about 12 hours of fermentation to fully develop the authentic taste of sourdough. Because of the fermentation, sourdough breads have a much longer shelf life than that of breads made with commercial yeast.

    You could capture your own wild yeast to make a starter, but until you get familiar with wild yeast sourdough baking I would strongly recommend that you start with a proven starter that you get from someone who already has it thriving. Not all wild yeasts are strong enough to be capable of rising a loaf of bread, and not all have a desirable flavor. The flavor and rising capabilities can vary widely depending on the region where the yeast originated.

    Wild yeasts are living creatures and must be fed regularly. Feed only with flour and non-chlorinated water, usually in equal amounts. After feeding, the starter is then �proofed� (fermented) for 8 to 12 hours before using it to make bread dough. Some bakers feed and proof a second time before using. The more often you use your starter, the better your bread will be.

    Breads made with wild yeast generally take longer to rise than commercial yeast doughs. Sometimes it may take several hours. Be patient�it WILL rise! Never add commercial yeast. Trust your starter.

    The starter is kept in the refrigerator between uses, where it becomes semi-dormant. If it is not used for awhile it is important to take it out every week or two and dump out (yes, down the drain!) all but � to � cup. To this remaining small amount, feed again with equal amounts of flour and water. The amounts fed are not important as long as it is fed regularly. Your starter can be kept alive this way indefinitely.

    You can also dry your starter for long-term storage or to share with friends by mail. Feed the starter and wait until it is very bubbly. Line a cookie sheet with waxed paper or freezer paper, shiny side up. Drizzle a few spoonfuls on the paper and spread it out very thinly with the back of a spoon until the entire sheet is lightly coated. Set aside in a dust-free place until it is completely dry. This usually takes no more than 24 hours if spread very thin. Peel the dried starter off the paper in flakes, almost like potato chips. Place the flakes in a plastic zip-tip bag and crush finely (I like to roll a rolling pin over it). Store dried flakes in the refrigerator until needed.[/url]
    Bonnie G #2
    Fri Aug 27, 2010 11:38 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Found you, now need to save in fav. icon_cool.gif
    CarrolJ
    Sat Aug 28, 2010 6:55 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I'm here for a couple more hours then we are going to visit our DD & family. Have fun!
    adopt a greyhound
    Sat Aug 28, 2010 11:25 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Hi all,
    I'm on day 2 of WILD YEAST SOURDOUGH STARTER.
    I am anxious to use it in bread and pizza dough.
    I will have to be patient for a while yet but love homemade bread.
    Thanks for all the information in the threads.
    duonyte
    Sat Aug 28, 2010 1:01 pm
    Forum Host
    Wonderful - glad to see you here and we will be interested to hear how it goes for you!
    Bonnie G #2
    Sat Aug 28, 2010 6:34 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    adopt a greyhound wrote:
    Hi all,
    I'm on day 2 of WILD YEAST SOURDOUGH STARTER.
    I am anxious to use it in bread and pizza dough.
    I will have to be patient for a while yet but love homemade bread.
    Thanks for all the information in the threads.


    Take photos if you can we love to see how it goes for you
    adopt a greyhound
    Mon Aug 30, 2010 11:14 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I'm on day 4 and a little confused for day 5.
    Do you discard all but 1/4 c. each day and then add
    1/4 c. flour and water?
    Or just keep adding 1/4 c. flour and water until it doubles?
    Donna M.
    Mon Aug 30, 2010 12:44 pm
    Forum Host
    Yes, you always do the discard first. This is very important as it removes a lot of the spent flour that the starter has consumed the nutrients out of and it keeps the acidity down to a healthy level once the starter gets active. Too much acidity will eat the gluten in your bread doughs and cause it to not rise well.

    Did you use rye or whole wheat in your starter? If you want, you can continue to use a spoonful of the wholegrain flour along with the white flour when you feed. I think it helps the starter to be stronger.
    adopt a greyhound
    Mon Aug 30, 2010 4:33 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Thank you, Donna.
    I used whole wheat flour for the starter.
    I just checked it and it is rising quite high already.
    Thanks for the info.
    Bonnie G #2
    Mon Aug 30, 2010 8:13 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    adopt a greyhound wrote:
    Thank you, Donna.
    I used whole wheat flour for the starter.
    I just checked it and it is rising quite high already.
    Thanks for the info.


    Sounds like you are really doing well, can't wait to hear about your bread when you bake it. icon_biggrin.gif
    Tea Jenny
    Sun Sep 05, 2010 11:05 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Hi everyone,
    I made this and it was a three day process, but it's so good. I think the best loaf I have made. I followed Eric's instructions on breadtopia, it has four different kinds of flour, plain white bread flour, spelt, wholemeal with seeds and rye. It is a bit spread out so I think I should of added a bit more flour and it would of been perfect.
    [img]Photobucket[/img]
    [img]Photobucket[/img]
    adopt a greyhound
    Sun Sep 05, 2010 11:43 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Tea Jenny
    Your bread looks wonderful.
    Could you share the recipe?
    I have a very young sourdough starter (10 days) but will
    be trying many recipes in the future.
    Tea Jenny
    Sun Sep 05, 2010 1:09 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I can't quite remember the exact amounts, but if you go to breadtopia.com you will get the recipe. icon_wink.gif
    Donna M.
    Sun Sep 05, 2010 6:06 pm
    Forum Host
    adopt a greyhound wrote:
    Tea Jenny
    Your bread looks wonderful.
    Could you share the recipe?
    I have a very young sourdough starter (10 days) but will
    be trying many recipes in the future.


    How's that starter doing, anyway? Is it looking like it is about ready to use? It should be just about there!
    adopt a greyhound
    Sun Sep 05, 2010 6:28 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I put it into the frig. this morning and will be using it later this week.
    I hope I didn't rush it too much.
    Go to page 1, 2, 3 ... 23, 24, 25  Next Page >> Stop sending e-mails when someone replies
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