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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Breads & Baking / Baking with Wild Yeast Sourdough Starters--IV
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    Baking with Wild Yeast Sourdough Starters--IV

    Go to page << Previous Page  1, 2, 3 ... 23, 24, 25
    Galley Wench
    Wed Apr 03, 2013 1:31 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Yes, it does seem like allot. . . .ordered mine from King Arthur, but I'll bet you could find it at Whole Foods or Sprouts.
    CarrolJ
    Wed Apr 03, 2013 1:45 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Galley Wench wrote:
    Yes, it does seem like allot. . . .ordered mine from King Arthur, but I'll bet you could find it at Whole Foods or Sprouts.


    I'm sure that it is not available here in NW Iowa. I will have to order online. I found it at Amazon as well. I'm thinking seriously about ordering.
    Bonnie G #2
    Wed Apr 03, 2013 1:58 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    CarrolJ wrote:
    Bonnie G #2 wrote:
    Galley Wench wrote:
    Red Apple Guy wrote:
    I used some powdered malt for bagels and a few other breads. It was a sweetener mostly and added a good flavor.

    Red


    Looks like there are two kinds of malt, non-diastatic (which sweetens and adds shine) and diastatic which helps get a better rise, especially for whole grains.


    I've used the diastatic and it did give a wonderful rise to the bread. Since then I try to use it whenever I can remember


    This is new to me. What happens if you use both non-diastatic and diastatic malt in the same loaf. Do they cancel each other out? I like the thought of using the diastatic malt for a better rise in whole grain breads. I think one of the reasons I am not a fan of eating the whole grains is due to the dense texture. So far online it looks like you have to purchase the diastatic malt in 1 pound amounts. I've seen that you only use 1 teaspoon per loaf. It would be nice to find in a smaller amount.


    I ordered mine on line from King Arthur Flour and it was much smaller than that
    CarrolJ
    Wed Apr 03, 2013 2:31 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Bonnie G #2 wrote:
    CarrolJ wrote:
    Bonnie G #2 wrote:
    Galley Wench wrote:
    Red Apple Guy wrote:
    I used some powdered malt for bagels and a few other breads. It was a sweetener mostly and added a good flavor.

    Red


    Looks like there are two kinds of malt, non-diastatic (which sweetens and adds shine) and diastatic which helps get a better rise, especially for whole grains.


    I've used the diastatic and it did give a wonderful rise to the bread. Since then I try to use it whenever I can remember


    This is new to me. What happens if you use both non-diastatic and diastatic malt in the same loaf. Do they cancel each other out? I like the thought of using the diastatic malt for a better rise in whole grain breads. I think one of the reasons I am not a fan of eating the whole grains is due to the dense texture. So far online it looks like you have to purchase the diastatic malt in 1 pound amounts. I've seen that you only use 1 teaspoon per loaf. It would be nice to find in a smaller amount.


    I ordered mine on line from King Arthur Flour and it was much smaller than that


    Ok...I'll look again. I only saw the 16 oz size listed.
    CarrolJ
    Wed Apr 03, 2013 3:31 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I checked it out again at King Arthur and they only currently list the 16 oz. So I bit the bullet and ordered it from Amazon. I was able to get free 2 day shipping from Amazon plus even with the higher cost of the item, still totaled $2 cheaper than King Arthur Flour. In my case, quicker was important since I need it for the PAC game.

    I am a Prime Member of Amazon...and since you can share it with a few family members it has saved an amazing amount of money in shipping plus it is so much faster. Faster is important when you live in a remote area.

    Do any of you remember the days when you would order something (no matter where you lived) and you would be told you would receive it in 6 to 8 weeks? I never understood why it took so long. Todays shipments show it was not necessary. I believe the companies just wanted to use your money for a few weeks before they shipped it by donkey! These days most online companies don't even charge your account until the item is shipped. A completely different concept.
    Red Apple Guy
    Wed Apr 03, 2013 3:52 pm
    Forum Host
    icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif
    Bonnie G #2
    Thu Apr 04, 2013 9:05 am
    Food.com Groupie
    So true Carrol, I sure do remember! I'm off to the Baking site to see what's been going on there.
    Go to page << Previous Page  1, 2, 3 ... 23, 24, 25 E-mail me when someone replies to this
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