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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Breads & Baking / Baking with Wild Yeast Sourdough Starters--IV
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    Baking with Wild Yeast Sourdough Starters--IV

    Go to page << Previous Page  1, 2, 3 ... , 23, 24, 25  Next Page >>
    Red Apple Guy
    Mon Apr 01, 2013 9:20 pm
    Forum Host
    Me too. I keep my flakes in the fridge.

    Bonnie, the stretch and fold thing is a challenge to my patience. I wait at least 10 minutes (for doughs that rise in less than an hour) between stretch-and-fold episodes and 20 to 40 minutes for slower doughs like sourdough.
    Galley Wench
    Mon Apr 01, 2013 10:49 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I keep mine in the freezer, however a friend brought me a bread cook book which had a package of sourdough flakes that had been in the attic for 30 YEARS and they 'did their thinhg/ when I added water!!! I think it has more to do with humitdty . . . she was up in mountains of Califoria where is was dry~

    PS: I love the the stretch and fold method . . . make sure you allow the dough to set for 10 minutes between each stretch and fold (four times total). Don't given in to the urge to knead .. .it works~
    Bonnie G #2
    Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:01 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I've been keeping mine in the fridge too, so guess that's good. I did have trouble getting mine started in Trinidad is the reason I was wondering, but then it can be very humid there.

    I didn't know with the stretch n fold that you had to wait, between - that must be what I've been doing wrong. So you fold once, WAIT, then fold AGAIN? Or fold 4 times each, WAIT then fold again 4 times each?
    Galley Wench
    Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:20 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Once the dry and wet ingredients are incorporated cover and let rest for 10 minutes, then remove from the bowl to an OILED surface (not flour), do the stretch and fold, let rest 10 more minutes (covered), then stretch and fold again . . . do this a total of 4 times. It's a very wet dough, 80%! Found a video by Peter Reinhart, you can see how it changes.

    http://m.youtube.com/#/watch?v=1timJlCT3PM&desktop_uri=%2Fwatch%3Fv%3D1timJlCT3PM
    Bonnie G #2
    Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:24 am
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    Thanks GW; I'm off to watch it, need to actually see just what I'm doing wrong. But can you do this with ANY sourdough recipe
    Galley Wench
    Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:35 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Good question . . .I've only used the method with the real wet doughs, not sure how tha would work with the usual 65% hydration doughs.
    Galley Wench
    Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:37 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Good explanation/discussion here . . . http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/19912/kneading-or-stretch-fold-or-both

    As you can see there are different opinions.


    Last edited by Galley Wench on Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:43 am, edited 2 times in total
    Red Apple Guy
    Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:38 am
    Forum Host
    I may be wrong, but I think time is more important than stretching and folding (S&F). I've been wanting to try a short knead instead of S&F. The time allows the dough to relax so that you can do a S&F again and I'm not sure, but I believe the reactions to form gluten make take a little time as well.

    Kneading is a form of S&F, but wet dough is difficult or impossible to knead, but easy to S&F, even if you have to use a scraper to lift and stretch the dough.

    Typically, i knead my dough for several minutes - usually in a mixer - and then do several S&F's spread out over the first half of the rising time. I have done just S&Fs with success for wet dough.
    Galley Wench
    Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:49 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Don't want to derail this discussion, but has anyone here used malt (diastatic and non-diastatic malt) in their doughs? I recently bought some and have yet to use it! Maybe today is the day!
    Red Apple Guy
    Tue Apr 02, 2013 4:21 pm
    Forum Host
    I used some powdered malt for bagels and a few other breads. It was a sweetener mostly and added a good flavor.

    Red
    CarrolJ
    Tue Apr 02, 2013 7:37 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Galley Wench wrote:
    Once the dry and wet ingredients are incorporated cover and let rest for 10 minutes, then remove from the bowl to an OILED surface (not flour), do the stretch and fold, let rest 10 more minutes (covered), then stretch and fold again . . . do this a total of 4 times. It's a very wet dough, 80%! Found a video by Peter Reinhart, you can see how it changes.

    http://m.youtube.com/#/watch?v=1timJlCT3PM&desktop_uri=%2Fwatch%3Fv%3D1timJlCT3PM


    very interesting video...food for thought indeed. I would probably love the crusty exterior but DH has trouble eating bread that has a crispy crust. (He is in need of new dentures.)
    CarrolJ
    Tue Apr 02, 2013 7:40 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Red Apple Guy wrote:
    I may be wrong, but I think time is more important than stretching and folding (S&F). I've been wanting to try a short knead instead of S&F. The time allows the dough to relax so that you can do a S&F again and I'm not sure, but I believe the reactions to form gluten make take a little time as well.

    Kneading is a form of S&F, but wet dough is difficult or impossible to knead, but easy to S&F, even if you have to use a scraper to lift and stretch the dough.

    Typically, i knead my dough for several minutes - usually in a mixer - and then do several S&F's spread out over the first half of the rising time. I have done just S&Fs with success for wet dough.


    That is why I might love to try the S & F method. I had an instance last week where I was making a new recipe for the PAC game, and it was so wet that I had to add a lot of extra flour and even then it was almost too wet to handle. The rolls turned out well however and rose amazingly well.
    Galley Wench
    Tue Apr 02, 2013 8:30 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Red Apple Guy wrote:
    I used some powdered malt for bagels and a few other breads. It was a sweetener mostly and added a good flavor.

    Red


    Looks like there are two kinds of malt, non-diastatic (which sweetens and adds shine) and diastatic which helps get a better rise, especially for whole grains.
    Bonnie G #2
    Wed Apr 03, 2013 11:00 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Galley Wench wrote:
    Red Apple Guy wrote:
    I used some powdered malt for bagels and a few other breads. It was a sweetener mostly and added a good flavor.

    Red


    Looks like there are two kinds of malt, non-diastatic (which sweetens and adds shine) and diastatic which helps get a better rise, especially for whole grains.


    I've used the diastatic and it did give a wonderful rise to the bread. Since then I try to use it whenever I can remember
    CarrolJ
    Wed Apr 03, 2013 11:21 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Bonnie G #2 wrote:
    Galley Wench wrote:
    Red Apple Guy wrote:
    I used some powdered malt for bagels and a few other breads. It was a sweetener mostly and added a good flavor.

    Red


    Looks like there are two kinds of malt, non-diastatic (which sweetens and adds shine) and diastatic which helps get a better rise, especially for whole grains.


    I've used the diastatic and it did give a wonderful rise to the bread. Since then I try to use it whenever I can remember


    This is new to me. What happens if you use both non-diastatic and diastatic malt in the same loaf. Do they cancel each other out? I like the thought of using the diastatic malt for a better rise in whole grain breads. I think one of the reasons I am not a fan of eating the whole grains is due to the dense texture. So far online it looks like you have to purchase the diastatic malt in 1 pound amounts. I've seen that you only use 1 teaspoon per loaf. It would be nice to find in a smaller amount.
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