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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / African Cooking / WILD THINGS! GAME, VENISON AND EXOTIC FOODS!
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    WILD THINGS! GAME, VENISON AND EXOTIC FOODS!

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    Zurie
    Sun May 30, 2010 1:53 pm
    Forum Host


    This is your new forum thread for all your questions and comments on game meats, venison and exotic ingredients.

    Please feel free to share your unusual food experiences with us!

    We will also tell tales about strange foods eaten across the world, and would love your take on it: do you find it unethical, okay, or ecologically unsustainable?

    Let's go for a walk on the wild side of cuisine ...


    Last edited by Zurie on Sun Jun 06, 2010 2:13 am, edited 1 time in total
    JoyfulCook
    Mon May 31, 2010 4:07 am
    Forum Host
    What is the ideal length of time that Venison or other wild meat should be hung? There does not seem to be a set rule on this.
    Chef Shadows
    Mon May 31, 2010 3:52 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    JoyfulCook wrote:
    What is the ideal length of time that Venison or other wild meat should be hung? There does not seem to be a set rule on this.


    Depends on the ambient temperature, if you like aged or fresh, skinned or unskinned aging, etc.
    In other words it is a personal choice.
    Chef Shadows
    Mon May 31, 2010 3:55 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Zurie wrote:


    This is your new forum thread for all your questions and comments on game meats, venison and exotic ingredients.

    Please feel free to share your unusual food experiences with us!

    We will also tell tales about strange foods eaten across the world, and would love your take on it: do you find it unethical, okay, or ecologically unsustainable?

    Let's go for a walk on the wild side of cuisine ...


    I hope the original forum topic does not become lost on the site, so much good info there...

    I do not visit the African forum much, not much for me there...
    JoyfulCook
    Tue Jun 01, 2010 2:57 am
    Forum Host
    Thanks Shadows - I have been promised as haunch of Venison - arriving today - I assume it will be skinned. We like meat hung - weather is variable - will play it by ear.

    We hope to have people visit us here - being in the African forum - it might do well as we get more passing trade - so to speak!
    Tiggrr
    Wed Jun 02, 2010 8:41 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    posting to keep up on things. after 6 years with a hunter i am still learning but have found a few things that do work..and some that really didn't. Marinading is certainly the key. There are lots posted on Zaar...I have one posted that we like but certainly need to pull out some venison steaks or chops to try some others.
    Paymaster
    Thu Jun 03, 2010 8:05 am
    Food.com Groupie
    First,Food.com now I have to go to the Africa Forum to read about cooking White Tailed Deer or Cotton Tail Rabbit. icon_sad.gif
    What's next,BBQ and Grillin to the Vegetarian Forum? icon_redface.gif
    JoyfulCook
    Thu Jun 03, 2010 9:24 am
    Forum Host
    Paymaster wrote:
    First,Food.com now I have to go to the Africa Forum to read about cooking White Tailed Deer or Cotton Tail Rabbit. icon_sad.gif
    What's next,BBQ and Grillin to the Vegetarian Forum? icon_redface.gif


    Paymaster, The Forum was going to be closed mainly due to lack of interest - I would post things, suggest things, ask who was hunting and what - and hardly ever got any replies icon_sad.gif

    so I asked if we could at least try to keep something going, and as I am also a host on the African forum - and they also have wild and exotic, it was worth giving it a try - hope that you stick around. we are hoping that it will pick up some interest.
    JoyfulCook
    Thu Jun 03, 2010 9:35 am
    Forum Host
    Welcome Tiggrr.

    I am going to try this recipe on the weekend it sounds great Roast Loin of Venison With Cranberries

    I am very interested in hearing what kind of marinade ingredients did and did not work - hope that you can let us know.

    Venison on the Barbecue last week was just so so tender.. I am sure that, lemon juice helps tenderise it, I added a splash of soya sauce and a few other things.
    Bone Man
    Thu Jun 03, 2010 12:13 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Hello, Joyful cook.

    Shadows is right -- it's really just a personal choice, after taking in to account sanitary considerations. Frequently, this is additionally a cultural issue. The English were (and possibly still are -- I don't know) noted for hanging venison and other meats for a pretty long time without actual refrigeration.. I can't do it. icon_eek.gif

    Mostly as a result of my years as a game warden, and what I observed over that period of my career, I don't "age" wild meats (or any meat) at all.

    When I kill a deer, it gets immediately field-dressed (including removal of leg glands) and the body cavity washed out as quickly as I can drag it to the nearest small stream. Then I wipe it out with a wet washcloth stowed inside a ziplock bag that I carry for that purpose.

    I then transport it to camp, rewash the body cavity in purified water, hang it (hopefully, the air temperature is 40 degrees F. or less), and as soon as the animal's body heat has dissipated, (after mandatory check-in), I skin, butcher, package, and blast-freeze it. The next time I see it is in my kitchen. The end result is that my deer (and other wild meats treated the same way) never convey the so-called "wild" flavor.

    I never accept wild meat from casual hunters because venison in particular is so often mishandled in the field (sadly, about 90% of the time!) But then, I rinse my chicken from the store before cooking it -- it probably makes no difference at that point. icon_lol.gif

    I will say though that proper aging in a controlled environment by the pros clearly has its benefit in terms of tenderness, at least within the beef industry. The very best beef steaks which are had by the very top restaurants are extremely expensive, upwards of 50 bucks per pound. I have other methods for tenderizing which aren't so pricey! icon_lol.gif

    Best regards to all,

    pat icon_cool.gif
    Zurie
    Thu Jun 03, 2010 2:27 pm
    Forum Host
    Hey, Pat, Bone man! Welcome to this thread! icon_biggrin.gif

    You are quite the fastidious hunter, aren't you! icon_wink.gif

    I agree, it all depends on ambient temperature, but really, red meats (whether domesticated or wild) should be hanged for X number of days, depending!!

    Naturally here too (South Africa, Namibia) game is skinned, cleaned, etc. etc. , but apart from the liver I don't think it's ever eaten fresh! icon_cool.gif

    Joy is more informed. I buy venison when I can get it, and all I know is it needs extra fat such as pork rashers, and a lot of certain spices such as pounded coriander seeds, ground cloves, garlic, etc., and a considerable time marinating in fairly good SA red wine!!
    Zurie
    Thu Jun 03, 2010 2:50 pm
    Forum Host
    Paymaster wrote:
    First,Food.com now I have to go to the Africa Forum to read about cooking White Tailed Deer or Cotton Tail Rabbit. icon_sad.gif
    What's next,BBQ and Grillin to the Vegetarian Forum? icon_redface.gif


    Paymaster ...

    We understand and hear what you say.

    The problem was: there was this forum which was seldom used. A decicion had to be made: was it worth having a forum where someone posted once a month?

    But the people who make the decisions on Zaar did not want "Wild","Game" and "Exotic Meats" to disappear.

    So a decision was made to move a permanent thread to the African forum -- for the sole reason that there is this myth that Africa is "wild and exotic". icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif

    I suggest you make a shortcut on your desktop to this thread. It will continue in much the same way as the "Wild and Exotic Forum."

    May we have many fruitful conversations here in the future!! icon_wink.gif icon_biggrin.gif
    Bokenpop aka Madeleine
    Thu Jun 03, 2010 3:22 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    As a child I remember many a kudu or gemsbok carcass hanging from the rafters of my ouma's enclosed stoep. There was always an enormous enamel dish under them for catching the blood and other drippings. We never ate freshly caught meat. It was hung for a week or more before my oupa butchered it. My ouma was a rare gem of a cook. She could marinate the wildsvleis so well that the gameyness of the meat was just a subtle background flavour.

    My oupa and uncles were all avid hunters and we had many guinea fowl dinners around their dinner table. As children we were delighted when we bit into a piece of the meat and encountered some of the small metal shotballs that had been missed in the cleaning. We had a competition of sorts to see who got the most!

    I remember well watching my ouma plucking and cleaning wild fowl and chickens with Ou Piepie the gardener eagerly waiting at the kitchen door for the feet and head so that his wife could cook them a feast. It never smelled good when Ou Piepie and Saraii cooked their food, but boy, it sure tasted good!
    JoyfulCook
    Thu Jun 03, 2010 3:33 pm
    Forum Host
    Madeleine! buckshot was part of the deal with wild fowl! I have to be honest, when it came to Kudu, or Thompsons Gazelle we only took the bucks and never any more than we could use, as we had friends hoping we had had a good days shooting!

    Hunting is much the same the world over. Boneman was so correct, we used to wash out everything as much has we could. but the wilds of Kenya were still full of animals watching you.

    I remember once, sitting having a lovely packed lunch with Simon and his brother, when we heard a cough.... never! have you seen us move so fast, and we landed on an outcrop of rock finishing what was left - while keeping an eye out for anything that we thought might take a fancy to us!

    sorry I wander. so back to wild game. mine has hug now for 5 days - and that enough, I will wash and dry it, and put it in the fridge as its going to be hot tomorrow.

    the venison I have had been shot on his own property!
    Bokenpop aka Madeleine
    Thu Jun 03, 2010 10:06 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Do you know, one of the first things I ask to eat when I go back home is wildsvleis biltong! The deer here just don't have the same taste.

    Growing up and visiting my grandparents on their farm in Pietersburg in the northern Transvaal, I became accustomed to seeing animals being hunted, cleaned and cooked. It was not something any of us seemed to be squeamish about, actually.

    My father was one of 8 siblings and each of them had 5 children! Every July for the three week school holidays many of the cousins would get to spend the holidays at my grandparents home. It was loud and busy and enormous fun! One of the things we cousins loved doing was going en masse to the Sandrivier to camp. The Sandrivier was about two street blocks away from the house and if anyone stood on my ouma's kitchen doorstep they could see exactly where we were! We were always laughed at by the adults for wanting to do such a stupid thing. But we insisted and they let us... See, during the day it was fine because the sun was out and we were active, but July is in wintertime in South Africa and it would become bitterly cold as soon as the sun set. So, one by one we would disappear back to the house to sleep and then start the camp all over again the following day. icon_lol.gif But, I digress! The boy cousins would all take their pellet guns with to shoot hare and guinea fowl. How they beamed with pride bringing home the loot to the family... and how they were praised for their accomplishments. Gosh, I miss those days.
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