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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / African Cooking / Recipe for "peri peri" sauce(used as a condiment)
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    Recipe for "peri peri" sauce(used as a condiment)

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    billyfish
    Wed May 05, 2010 9:37 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    I worked for several years in "Gabon West Africa"on a Shell oil gathering pant.I was self catering and ate a lot of my meals in the bars down town,mainly fish(since I caught it myself) with rice. The fish and meat was b/bqed The cooks,mainly from Cameroon used to make there own "peri peri"sauce.Ibecame adicted to it.Since returning home to the u/k I have tried several brands of the sauce but its a no go.The sauce by the way is used as a condiment.This is my last hope,thanking you in advance. billyfish.
    Zurie
    Wed May 05, 2010 2:36 pm
    Forum Host
    Billy ... Billyfish? icon_lol.gif

    Unfortunately for you, in South Africa we can buy peri-peri sauce in bottles.

    Recently I decided I must create my own peri-peri sauce, as we absolutely love it.

    I haven't done it so far (life tends to interfere with these things).

    The first problem is that you need the African Bird's Eye Cherry pepper.

    Okay, so you can't get that. Use cayenne peppers or another strong, red pepper.

    What I can tell you, is that peri-peri oil/the condiment/sauce consists of these ingredients, finely chopped and left to steep:

    Some pepper chopped up, vaguely related to African Bird's Eye
    Lemon juice
    Finely chopped garlic
    Any good oil, such as sunflower or canola

    I find it quite strange that I have searched the Internet, and I cannot source a peri-peri oil or sauce which sounds to me like the genuine article.

    But I anwered your question without any more research. I'll be back. I have one more website I want to check ...
    Zurie
    Wed May 05, 2010 2:49 pm
    Forum Host
    Here is recipe no 1. The cilantro is foreign to my experience of peri-peri -- but Africa is huge, and the variations of peri-peri must be numerous:

    (1)

    Peri-Peri Marinade

    "The words Pili-Pili, Piri-Piri, and Peri-Peri all are used to refer to hot chile peppers, sauces and marinades made from them, and foods cooked with those sauces and marinades. This spicy hot marinade can be used on any meat you grill or broil: chicken, shrimp or prawns, beef, etc. In Africa, spicy meat brochettes are often-seen street food."

    What you need

    •two or three fresh hot chile peppers (hot red peppers are typical; jalapeno peppers and poblano peppers are also good), chopped
    •four tablespoons lemon juice or lime juice (or cider vinegar)
    •four tablespoons oil
    •one tablespoon cayenne pepper or red pepper, or one tablespoon dried red pepper flakes (optional)
    •one teaspoon minced garlic (or garlic powder)
    •one tablespoon paprika
    •one teaspoon salt
    •dried or fresh oregano or parsley (or similar) (optional)

    (2) Maybe you'll have more luck than me in South Africa. This site says they have "4 or more" recipes for peri-peri sauce, but I seem to have Internet problems and simpy cannot open the pages:

    http://www.recipeland.com/search?q=peri+peri+sauce&search_type=Recipes

    3) Here is a local recipe. I think the lemon rind sounds nice, but I'm sure real peri-peri contains a small amount of lemon JUICE:

    PERI-PERI SAUCE

    Peri-peri appears to be the traditional domain of Portuguese people, yet everyone with a passion for heat simply adores these spiced-up, finger-licking peri-peri prawns or chicken. The sauce may be stored in the fridge for up to two months

    50g fresh red chillies, very finely chopped
    3 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
    500ml (2 cups) olive oil
    pared rind of 1 small lemon

    Mix the ingredients together in a 750 ml bottle and shake well. It may be used immediately, though the flavour improves with age, reaching its peak at two weeks.


    I still maintain that I haven't found the peri-peri sauce recipe!! Maybe I'm wrong! Maybe it takes experimentation! It's a little late here, so I'll say goodbye for now, and maybe continue the quest tomorrow ... icon_wink.gif
    JoyfulCook
    Wed May 05, 2010 4:40 pm
    Forum Host
    You an get birds eye dried chilli here in any asian food store if you are near any - what part of the u.k. are you now in?

    I live just outside cardiff and tomorrow I am going to an asian Godown which a bout the side or a supermarket. so much to discover and try out too
    kiwidutch
    Fri May 07, 2010 1:58 am
    Food.com Groupie

    Billy,

    Peri-Peri is also spelled as Piri-Piri in Portugal and some other parts of the world...

    I've made this one from one of Zaar's Portuguese members and it's wonderful...


    Homemade Piri-Piri ( Hot Sauce) Mia's Way

    ...hope this is something like what you are looking for.. btw you don't taste the salt in the end product at all... just flavoursome fire LOL

    I do agree with Sackvilles comment in her review, next time I might cut the salt a bit as well, just so that it's healthier...
    Zurie
    Fri May 07, 2010 4:27 am
    Forum Host
    Thank you, Kiwidutch -- can you believe, I didn't search Zaar for peri-peri -- yes, also piri-piri!

    I have fresh red cayennes from my garden: I think I should try my hand at a home-made peri-peri now.

    That recipe sounds okay, but the real thing most defintely contain lemon juice too. Not enough to make it taste sour, just to give it that lemony tang. Very slightly.

    As a traditional sauce or, very often, a steeped oil, this condiment has of course many variations.

    Like Billy, I'm still looking for the perfect recipe! icon_lol.gif

    We have a chain of restaurants-takeaway places called Nando's. They make wonderful spatchcocked charcoal-fried chickens (with peri-peri flavours) and great fries. They also have outlets in some other countries. They now have lovely peri-peri sauces in various strengths on shop shelves.

    That's what makes it difficult to get down to it and make one's own!!

    The best peri-peri oil (which I am never without) is a reddish oil called "Spillers Peri-Peri Oil".

    It has no preservatives or anything artificial, and the ingredients are listed (as vague as always!!) as sunflower oil, capsicum, paprika, herbs, spices, lemon juice ... icon_confused.gif
    billyfish
    Fri May 07, 2010 11:42 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Thank you "Zurie""Joyfullcook"and"Kiwidutch"for your quick and expert reply to my requesf.The peri peri sauce I had was not verry oily,allso the town (village) did not have access to a lot of herbs and spices.So I am going to try and make a small portion of"Mias#2"recipe kindly reccomended by "kiwidutch". In answer to your question "Joyfullcook"Iam a born and bred Geordie,and live five mile out side Newcastle on Tyne.There is a large market in the town and my brother reckons there will be no problem purchasing the chillis.Ihope there is no problem me answering your replies to me in one go.Once again,thank you all.Billyfish.
    Dreamer in Ontario
    Fri May 14, 2010 7:42 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I just ran across this thread. You might like this version:
    Traditional Portuguese Piri Piri Sauce for Chicken. I love this recipe and have shared it with coworkers who love it, too, and make it regularly. Naturally it's also good with fish.
    Zurie
    Sat May 15, 2010 12:05 pm
    Forum Host
    Dreamer, thanks a million, I saved the recipe immediately to my Main cookbook. icon_biggrin.gif

    Looks great, and vague like most recipes!

    I think I'll z-mail Billyfish and tell him about it.
    JoyfulCook
    Thu May 20, 2010 3:53 pm
    Forum Host
    I have also saved it - yum!
    WhiteSnake
    Wed Jun 09, 2010 12:07 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I found this on the net after seeing a guy on the Food Network use in on Bobby Flay's Throw Down. He basted his grilled hot dogs with it just before serving.


    What you need

    •two or three fresh hot chile peppers (hot red peppers are typical; jalapeno peppers and poblano peppers are also good), chopped
    •four tablespoons lemon juice or lime juice (or cider vinegar)
    •four tablespoons oil
    •one tablespoon cayenne pepper or red pepper, or one tablespoon dried red pepper flakes (optional)
    •one teaspoon minced garlic (or garlic powder)
    •one tablespoon paprika
    •one teaspoon salt
    •dried or fresh oregano or parsley (or similar) (optional)

    What you do

    •Combine all ingredients. Grind and mix the ingredients into a smooth paste. Adjust the ratio of cayenne pepper and paprika to taste. Rub marinade onto meat and allow to marinate in a glass bowl for at least thirty minutes (or overnight if possible) before cooking. This marinade works well on chicken, beef, or any other grilled meat. Some cooks briefly cook the mixture before storing it. "Aging" the marinade by storing it in a refrigerator for a few days allows the flavor to develop.
    Zurie
    Wed Jun 09, 2010 2:17 pm
    Forum Host
    WhiteSnake wrote:
    I found this on the net after seeing a guy on the Food Network use in on Bobby Flay's Throw Down. He basted his grilled hot dogs with it just before serving.


    What you need

    •two or three fresh hot chile peppers (hot red peppers are typical; jalapeno peppers and poblano peppers are also good), chopped
    •four tablespoons lemon juice or lime juice (or cider vinegar)
    •four tablespoons oil
    •one tablespoon cayenne pepper or red pepper, or one tablespoon dried red pepper flakes (optional)
    •one teaspoon minced garlic (or garlic powder)
    •one tablespoon paprika
    •one teaspoon salt
    •dried or fresh oregano or parsley (or similar) (optional)

    What you do

    •Combine all ingredients. Grind and mix the ingredients into a smooth paste. Adjust the ratio of cayenne pepper and paprika to taste. Rub marinade onto meat and allow to marinate in a glass bowl for at least thirty minutes (or overnight if possible) before cooking. This marinade works well on chicken, beef, or any other grilled meat. Some cooks briefly cook the mixture before storing it. "Aging" the marinade by storing it in a refrigerator for a few days allows the flavor to develop.


    Thank you, WhiteSnake!! Spot-on type of ingredients, but as usual, a little bit vague.

    I've eaten peri-peri prawns (large shrimps) or chicken in Mozambique, actually in Maputo, at an ICON of a place called Costa do Sol, and elsewhere.

    I've also eaten the Real Thing at Portuguese and Mozambican restaurants in Greater Johannesburg.

    Peri-Peri/Piri-Piri/Pili-Pili (whatever) can have a strong bite, but never overwhelmingly strong. It does vary, and those wary of hot peppers can ask for "mild".

    There is always this wonderful "undertone" of garlic and lemon.

    It's hard to get the exact ratio of hot pepper/chillis to the rest of the spices to one's taste -- so I am sure you people will have to experiment, now that we have all these wonderful posts on here!! icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif

    As I said before, and this is no spam or ad, we have a chain selling mainly charcoal-grilled butterflied chicken (and wonderful chips/fries!) called Nando's.

    I know Nando's have branches or franchises overseas, but I don't know where.

    But they also market (here in all supermarkets) their bottles of "Nando's Peri-Peri" sauces, from hot to mild to garlic. It's very good.

    But I still think a perfect home-made sauce would be just great.

    Let us know what happens, and whether you found the perfect combination of ingredients! icon_biggrin.gif
    Cherylc
    Fri Jul 02, 2010 3:08 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Hi Billyfish

    My partner is Congolese and no Congolese meal is complete without pili pili sauce served as a condiment. He taught me how to make pili pili or hot pepper sauce to his discerning taste (he's a chef). It's very easy.

    What I do is put about 1lb of congo peppers (otherwise known as scotch bonnet peppers in the UK)mainly red but with a few yellow ones, a large onion, a tablespoon of salt, 5 fluid ounces of oil( olive or corn oil or whatever you like )and 2-3 fluid ounces of white vinegar in a food processor and process until it is smooth as it will go. Then I cook the mixture until softened in a non stick frying pan for about 10 to 15 minutes stirring constantly and trying not to breath in the fumes!

    Have a tiny taste and if it is too hot add a little more vinegar. You can also add more salt if required. I know I have the correct heat if my partner tastes it and coughs and splutters a little. Then spoon into 3 clean steralised jam jars and store in the fridge. It keeps for several months.

    This sauce is very hot! I would only use about a sixteenth of a teaspoonful on my plate. Congo peppers are a must for this sauce as they have a flavour which is quite distinct from all other peppers. I am lucky in that I can buy them cheaply in Manchester UK at african and asian foodshops.

    This sauce is quite thick and if you like you can add more oil. I prefer not to as this makes the sauce more runny. I like a thicker sauce so I know it's going to stay put on my plate!

    Family and friends, Engish and African, all like this sauce and I hope you will too if you give it a try, it's easy to scale down the quantities.
    Zurie
    Sat Jul 03, 2010 10:05 am
    Forum Host
    Cherylc wrote:
    Hi Billyfish

    My partner is Congolese and no Congolese meal is complete without pili pili sauce served as a condiment. He taught me how to make pili pili or hot pepper sauce to his discerning taste (he's a chef). It's very easy.

    What I do is put about 1lb of congo peppers (otherwise known as scotch bonnet peppers in the UK)mainly red but with a few yellow ones, a large onion, a tablespoon of salt, 5 fluid ounces of oil( olive or corn oil or whatever you like )and 2-3 fluid ounces of white vinegar in a food processor and process until it is smooth as it will go. Then I cook the mixture until softened in a non stick frying pan for about 10 to 15 minutes stirring constantly and trying not to breath in the fumes!

    Have a tiny taste and if it is too hot add a little more vinegar. You can also add more salt if required. I know I have the correct heat if my partner tastes it and coughs and splutters a little. Then spoon into 3 clean steralised jam jars and store in the fridge. It keeps for several months.

    This sauce is very hot! I would only use about a sixteenth of a teaspoonful on my plate. Congo peppers are a must for this sauce as they have a flavour which is quite distinct from all other peppers. I am lucky in that I can buy them cheaply in Manchester UK at african and asian foodshops.

    This sauce is quite thick and if you like you can add more oil. I prefer not to as this makes the sauce more runny. I like a thicker sauce so I know it's going to stay put on my plate!

    Family and friends, Engish and African, all like this sauce and I hope you will too if you give it a try, it's easy to scale down the quantities.


    Cheryl, you made me chuckle a little anxiously! icon_lol.gif Thank you so much! But that is a seriously strong sauce!! I mean, about 12 on the Scoville (?) rating of 1 - 10 for pepper strength!! rotfl.gif

    Scotch bonnet peppers are easy to find.

    But I am a little frightened of your sauce!! Your husband must have a steel-lined mouth and throat! icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif
    Cherylc
    Fri Jul 09, 2010 2:26 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Hi Zurie. The pili pili sauce I make is about medium strength as far as I can tell compared to pili pili sauce I have eaten when eating out in the Congolese community here in the UK. They like their sauce HOT! It's a nice sauce, you just have to be careful. Cheryl.
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