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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / African Cooking / Ginger Date Loaf (Botswana): Question
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    Ginger Date Loaf (Botswana): Question

    averybird
    Sun Jan 27, 2013 4:18 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Hi there- I have a recipe for a Ginger Date Loaf that comes from a cookbook about Botswana (it's actually a companion book to the Alexander McCall Smith "No 1. Ladies Detective Agency" books, so I don't know how authentic it is). Anyway, this recipe calls for 1 ounce of 'Bicarbonate of Soda'. My questions:

    1.) I'm assuming Bicarbonate of Soda and Baking Soda are equivalents, is this correct?

    2.) I did the conversion online and found that 1 ounce equals 2 Tbsp. This recipe is for a single loaf of bread. Does this number sound at all feasible? To me it sounds very high. Or maybe I'm converting this wrong? (other ingredients for this bread include 2 cups flour, 3/4 cups sugar, 8oz chopped dates, 1 egg, 3 oz butter)

    3. As I said this recipe is from Botswana. Does anyone know if this is typical amount of B.S. of an African recipe for a fruit bread? Or am I looking at a typo here.


    I appreciate any feedback you've got. Thank you! icon_smile.gif
    Leggy Peggy
    Mon Jan 28, 2013 4:37 am
    Food.com Groupie
    averybird wrote:
    Hi there- I have a recipe for a Ginger Date Loaf that comes from a cookbook about Botswana (it's actually a companion book to the Alexander McCall Smith "No 1. Ladies Detective Agency" books, so I don't know how authentic it is). Anyway, this recipe calls for 1 ounce of 'Bicarbonate of Soda'. My questions:

    1.) I'm assuming Bicarbonate of Soda and Baking Soda are equivalents, is this correct?

    2.) I did the conversion online and found that 1 ounce equals 2 Tbsp. This recipe is for a single loaf of bread. Does this number sound at all feasible? To me it sounds very high. Or maybe I'm converting this wrong? (other ingredients for this bread include 2 cups flour, 3/4 cups sugar, 8oz chopped dates, 1 egg, 3 oz butter)

    3. As I said this recipe is from Botswana. Does anyone know if this is typical amount of B.S. of an African recipe for a fruit bread? Or am I looking at a typo here.




    Hi averybird wave.gif

    1) Yes, bicarb of soda and baking soda are the same thing.
    2) Yes, 1 ounce equals 2 tablespoons (or 6 teaspoons).
    3) I think you might be looking at a typo. It seems a huge amount of baking
    soda for that amount of flour. Maybe 1–2 teaspoons?

    I've never known baking soda to be measured by weight—always level spoons.
    Maybe Zurie will have a better idea.
    averybird
    Mon Jan 28, 2013 8:09 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Thanks for your reply, Peggy! icon_smile.gif I noticed the previous recipe in the book measures the B.S. in teaspoons and only calls for 1 teaspoon for a banana cake. So I think I'll definitely cut it back.
    Leggy Peggy
    Mon Jan 28, 2013 8:17 am
    Food.com Groupie
    averybird wrote:
    Thanks for your reply, Peggy! icon_smile.gif I noticed the previous recipe in the book measures the B.S. in teaspoons and only calls for 1 teaspoon for a banana cake. So I think I'll definitely cut it back.


    A very strong argument that you are seeing a typo. Go with your instinct.
    Use 1–2 teaspoons and let us know what you did and how it turns out.

    Any way to alert the author to the mistake?
    averybird
    Mon Jan 28, 2013 11:55 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Thanks, I think I will. I'll just looked up the publisher and alerted them by email. That way if it's incorrect that can change it for future editions.
    Zurie
    Mon Jan 28, 2013 1:47 pm
    Forum Host
    Leggy Peggy wrote:
    averybird wrote:
    Hi there- I have a recipe for a Ginger Date Loaf that comes from a cookbook about Botswana (it's actually a companion book to the Alexander McCall Smith "No 1. Ladies Detective Agency" books, so I don't know how authentic it is). Anyway, this recipe calls for 1 ounce of 'Bicarbonate of Soda'. My questions:

    1.) I'm assuming Bicarbonate of Soda and Baking Soda are equivalents, is this correct?

    2.) I did the conversion online and found that 1 ounce equals 2 Tbsp. This recipe is for a single loaf of bread. Does this number sound at all feasible? To me it sounds very high. Or maybe I'm converting this wrong? (other ingredients for this bread include 2 cups flour, 3/4 cups sugar, 8oz chopped dates, 1 egg, 3 oz butter)

    3. As I said this recipe is from Botswana. Does anyone know if this is typical amount of B.S. of an African recipe for a fruit bread? Or am I looking at a typo here.




    Hi averybird wave.gif

    1) Yes, bicarb of soda and baking soda are the same thing.
    2) Yes, 1 ounce equals 2 tablespoons (or 6 teaspoons).
    3) I think you might be looking at a typo. It seems a huge amount of baking
    soda for that amount of flour. Maybe 1–2 teaspoons?

    I've never known baking soda to be measured by weight—always level spoons.
    Maybe Zurie will have a better idea.


    Wow, that is wayyy too much bicarb of soda!! Soda needs an acid ingredient to actually work well, and I see no acidic ingredient in the recipe!!

    I think what was meant was baking powder, but the maximum which is used is 2 teaspoons per cup of flour. So that still means only 20 ml baking powder (4 teaspoons) for the 2 cups of flour.

    I think -- take this recipe with a pinch of salt ... and look for a high-scoring ginger-date loaf recipe on this site!! icon_wink.gif icon_lol.gif
    averybird
    Mon Jan 28, 2013 3:45 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Thanks for weighing in, Zurie! icon_biggrin.gif I see no acid at all in the recipe. Perhaps they did mean baking powder. I might just have to find a different recipe after all (the only thing I've measured so far are the chopped dates).
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