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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Mexican / Tex-Mex / Southwest United States / New Mexico Cuisine.... Share the love!
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    New Mexico Cuisine.... Share the love!

    Go to page << Previous Page  1, 2, 3 ... 13, 14, 15, 16  Next Page >>
    *SimplyME*
    Wed Mar 03, 2010 7:21 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Vseward (Chef~V) wrote:
    Alright yawl! You've all inspired me. I just bought my first ever bag of NM CHILE PODS!

    SO excited I'm going to make chile sum something icon_lol.gif


    You may never go back to chile powder! icon_lol.gif
    Vseward (Chef~V)
    Wed Mar 03, 2010 7:31 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Okay I already have a question icon_eek.gif

    After I clean the pods, remove seeds and whatnot, do I roast them in the oven, geez I feel silly asking this!
    Vseward (Chef~V)
    Wed Mar 03, 2010 9:43 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    WI Cheesehead wrote:
    Hi all. Just got invited over by V from my Facebook acct. I'm currently in WI, but we're planning to move to New Mexico (near Rio Rancho or Albuq.) as soon as we sell the house. Don't have it ready yet, but trying to asap. Do you mind if I ask any questions about New Mexico and possibly the Albuq. area?


    Ask away Gf. ..... that's what were here for. Glad to see ya here!

    I remember it wasn't safe to plant a garden until after Easter due to snow icon_evil.gif BUT it rarely got over 100' icon_smile.gif
    Vseward (Chef~V)
    Wed Mar 03, 2010 9:55 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Please excuse typos, trying to respond thru my droid icon_rolleyes.gif
    *SimplyME*
    Thu Mar 04, 2010 10:17 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Vseward (Chef~V) wrote:
    Okay I already have a question icon_eek.gif

    After I clean the pods, remove seeds and whatnot, do I roast them in the oven, geez I feel silly asking this!


    I don't roast them, some people do. I prefer not roasting them cause you might over do it and will not taste good. How do I know this? icon_lol.gif My grandmothers and mom never did and I heard about people doing it and I tried it once.
    *SimplyME*
    Thu Mar 04, 2010 10:19 am
    Food.com Groupie
    It's suppose to be 71 degrees and windy today. Next week will probably be cold again. I've never lived up in the Albuquerque area so not sure about the weather. I do know it is colder than Las Cruces.
    Luna's Girl
    Thu Mar 04, 2010 3:51 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    There is nothing like SW New Mexico cuisine. My SO and I grew up in Central (Santa Clara now) New Mexico. I have lived from one coast to the other and now matter how much it is called "Mexican" it just isn't the same. We now live in northern Georgia and we order our red and green chile from New Mexico on a regular basis. Perhaps someone can help me. We want to make some Carne Adobada but can't find a recipe that looks like what I used to be able to buy at the local market in NM. Everything I have found has a smooth sauce that resembles my enchilada sauce. The Carne Adobada that I used to buy looked like it was made with crushed seeds, perhaps chile piquin, as part of the recipe. I don't have many recipe's posted, but I have put some of our favorites on when one of my family members asked me how to make this or that.
    Molly53
    Thu Mar 04, 2010 4:46 pm
    Forum Host
    Take a look at Pork Adobada or Carne Adovada OR

    Carne Adovada
    Ingredients:
    •4 lbs of pork shoulder, fat trimmed, and cut into cubes or larger chunks
    •20-30 dried New Mexico chili peppers, or guajillo chilies, like I used
    •2 tbsp of olive oil
    •8 cloves of garlic, chopped
    •2 large onions, chopped
    •generous pinch of salt
    •generous pinch of pepper
    •1/2 tbsp Mexican Oregano
    •3-4 cups of chicken stock
    •corn tortillas
    •water
    Begin by ripping off the stems of the dried chili peppers and empty out all of the seeds. Feel free to cut a slit into each chili if it helps removing the seeds. Get a large pot of water boiling and add in your chilies, cooking until nice and tender, about 40 minutes. During this time, get a large skillet out and warm the olive oil on a medium heat. Take a small batch of the pork shoulder and brown each side, roughly 2-3 minutes per side. Do this for all of the pork, adding more oil if necessary. Once the shoulder is browned, remove to a slow cooker if you have one, or place in a large pot. Once all of the pork has been cooked, toss in the onions, garlic, and salt and pepper to the skillet, and cook for about 5 minutes.

    Once the chilies have softened, add them to a blender with about a cup, or more of the water it was cooking in. Add in the onion and garlic mixture, and the chicken stock. Blend until you have a nice sauce, with the everything being pureed. You should have a nice smooth sauce. Add this sauce to the slow cooker or large pot, making sure that the pork is covered. Cook this for about 3 hours on the stove, or go low and slow in the slow cooker for 6-8 hours.

    You are ready to serve this up. I like mine simply placed in a bowl, with an egg on top, using corn tortillas as my helper. However, once you taste this, you will probably want to put it in a taco, stuff it in a burrito, or go full force and use it for enchiladas.
    Vseward (Chef~V)
    Thu Mar 04, 2010 8:41 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    OMG Molly my mouth is watering after reading that wonderful recipe! Can't wait to try it and believe me I will! yummy.gif
    *SimplyME*
    Fri Mar 05, 2010 11:31 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Luna's Girl wrote:
    There is nothing like SW New Mexico cuisine. My SO and I grew up in Central (Santa Clara now) New Mexico. I have lived from one coast to the other and now matter how much it is called "Mexican" it just isn't the same. We now live in northern Georgia and we order our red and green chile from New Mexico on a regular basis. Perhaps someone can help me. We want to make some Carne Adobada but can't find a recipe that looks like what I used to be able to buy at the local market in NM. Everything I have found has a smooth sauce that resembles my enchilada sauce. The Carne Adobada that I used to buy looked like it was made with crushed seeds, perhaps chile piquin, as part of the recipe. I don't have many recipe's posted, but I have put some of our favorites on when one of my family members asked me how to make this or that.


    I don't have a recipe written down, as usual, but I know what you mean about the seeds. I make it like my mom does. She soaks the whole red chile pods as in making the chile puree. But don't blend as long and leave some of the seeds in it. Don't strain the puree, you will have pieces of the chile skin and seeds. Then mix with the pork meat before cooking and marinate at least 6 to 8 hours. My mom always made it covered in the oven about 250 until until the meat was tender. I guess you could use the crockpot too. The only other ingredients she added to the chile was the garlic, oregano and salt.
    *SimplyME*
    Fri Mar 05, 2010 11:52 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Luna's Girl
    Fri Mar 05, 2010 2:32 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Thank you so much. That sounds exactly like what I'm looking for. For some reason, I thought it had a different flavor than the red chile sauce, but then it HAS been 20 years ago...
    Denise!
    Sat Mar 06, 2010 11:20 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Molly53 wrote:
    Take a look at Pork Adobada or Carne Adovada OR

    Carne Adovada
    Ingredients:
    &#8226;4 lbs of pork shoulder, fat trimmed, and cut into cubes or larger chunks
    &#8226;20-30 dried New Mexico chili peppers, or guajillo chilies, like I used
    &#8226;2 tbsp of olive oil
    &#8226;8 cloves of garlic, chopped
    &#8226;2 large onions, chopped
    &#8226;generous pinch of salt
    &#8226;generous pinch of pepper
    &#8226;1/2 tbsp Mexican Oregano
    &#8226;3-4 cups of chicken stock
    &#8226;corn tortillas
    &#8226;water
    Begin by ripping off the stems of the dried chili peppers and empty out all of the seeds. Feel free to cut a slit into each chili if it helps removing the seeds. Get a large pot of water boiling and add in your chilies, cooking until nice and tender, about 40 minutes. During this time, get a large skillet out and warm the olive oil on a medium heat. Take a small batch of the pork shoulder and brown each side, roughly 2-3 minutes per side. Do this for all of the pork, adding more oil if necessary. Once the shoulder is browned, remove to a slow cooker if you have one, or place in a large pot. Once all of the pork has been cooked, toss in the onions, garlic, and salt and pepper to the skillet, and cook for about 5 minutes.

    Once the chilies have softened, add them to a blender with about a cup, or more of the water it was cooking in. Add in the onion and garlic mixture, and the chicken stock. Blend until you have a nice sauce, with the everything being pureed. You should have a nice smooth sauce. Add this sauce to the slow cooker or large pot, making sure that the pork is covered. Cook this for about 3 hours on the stove, or go low and slow in the slow cooker for 6-8 hours.

    You are ready to serve this up. I like mine simply placed in a bowl, with an egg on top, using corn tortillas as my helper. However, once you taste this, you will probably want to put it in a taco, stuff it in a burrito, or go full force and use it for enchiladas.


    Molly, is this recipe posted?
    adopt a greyhound
    Sat Mar 06, 2010 11:52 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I have enjoyed reading through all the posts. I have saved many recipes to try but would like to recommend the following recipe. We tried it last week and was wonderful.

    Puerco Perdigado Con Chile Rojo (Braised Pork With Red Chile Sau
    Molly53
    Sat Mar 06, 2010 1:34 pm
    Forum Host
    Denise! wrote:
    Molly53 wrote:
    Take a look at Pork Adobada or Carne Adovada OR

    Carne Adovada
    Ingredients:
    &#8226;4 lbs of pork shoulder, fat trimmed, and cut into cubes or larger chunks
    &#8226;20-30 dried New Mexico chili peppers, or guajillo chilies, like I used
    &#8226;2 tbsp of olive oil
    &#8226;8 cloves of garlic, chopped
    &#8226;2 large onions, chopped
    &#8226;generous pinch of salt
    &#8226;generous pinch of pepper
    &#8226;1/2 tbsp Mexican Oregano
    &#8226;3-4 cups of chicken stock
    &#8226;corn tortillas
    &#8226;water
    Begin by ripping off the stems of the dried chili peppers and empty out all of the seeds. Feel free to cut a slit into each chili if it helps removing the seeds. Get a large pot of water boiling and add in your chilies, cooking until nice and tender, about 40 minutes. During this time, get a large skillet out and warm the olive oil on a medium heat. Take a small batch of the pork shoulder and brown each side, roughly 2-3 minutes per side. Do this for all of the pork, adding more oil if necessary. Once the shoulder is browned, remove to a slow cooker if you have one, or place in a large pot. Once all of the pork has been cooked, toss in the onions, garlic, and salt and pepper to the skillet, and cook for about 5 minutes.

    Once the chilies have softened, add them to a blender with about a cup, or more of the water it was cooking in. Add in the onion and garlic mixture, and the chicken stock. Blend until you have a nice sauce, with the everything being pureed. You should have a nice smooth sauce. Add this sauce to the slow cooker or large pot, making sure that the pork is covered. Cook this for about 3 hours on the stove, or go low and slow in the slow cooker for 6-8 hours.

    You are ready to serve this up. I like mine simply placed in a bowl, with an egg on top, using corn tortillas as my helper. However, once you taste this, you will probably want to put it in a taco, stuff it in a burrito, or go full force and use it for enchiladas.


    Molly, is this recipe posted?
    No, I pulled it off the web because it looked so good. Feel free to post it if you want to, Denise, remembering that there are quite a few adobada/adovada recipes already in the db. icon_smile.gif
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