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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Community Cafe - Archives / Whoa! My apple has no seeds!
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    Whoa! My apple has no seeds!

    Chicagoland Chef du Jour
    Sat Feb 06, 2010 7:36 pm
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    Zip, nada, not a one! Should I take photos and write Ripley's?


    P.S. It's a "jazz" varietal
    K9 Owned
    Sat Feb 06, 2010 8:29 pm
    Forum Host
    Likely genetically modified and owned by Monsanto icon_wink.gif
    *Z*
    Sat Feb 06, 2010 8:56 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Mutant!! icon_eek.gif icon_lol.gif
    Kathy228
    Sun Feb 07, 2010 9:16 am
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    K9 Owned wrote:
    Likely genetically modified and owned by Monsanto icon_wink.gif

    Yeah. So you can't grow seedlings, but have to buy them from Monsanto: icon_twisted.gif .
    k
    Dib's
    Sun Feb 07, 2010 3:17 pm
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    Kathy228 wrote:
    K9 Owned wrote:
    Likely genetically modified and owned by Monsanto icon_wink.gif

    Yeah. So you can't grow seedlings, but have to buy them from Monsanto: icon_twisted.gif .
    k


    Gee, golly and gosh...let me think about it for a minute...........No Thanks!
    My guess we will All hear a Scientific Explanation shortly. I still say NO to Monsanto, GM's, and GMO's.
    Kathy228
    Sun Feb 07, 2010 3:44 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    DiB's wrote:
    ..My guess we will All hear a Scientific Explanation shortly. I still say NO to Monsanto, GM's, and GMO's.

    Di, I agree with you completely. Monsanto is the evil devil.
    I don't even want to get into the subject again... there's so much to study concerning the GMO's in our food supply. So I do what I can... trying not to eat GM'ed crops. It's not easy because of the corn, soybeans, rapeseed, etc. I buy organic to avoid them. Buying only heirloom tomatoes (cha-ching$). Never use packaged foods.
    k
    Vicki G.
    Sun Feb 07, 2010 4:13 pm
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    I'll have to check out the 'Jazz' apples I purchased yesterday ! curious if mine have seeds.
    Dib's
    Sun Feb 07, 2010 4:18 pm
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    Vicki G. wrote:
    I'll have to check out the 'Jazz' apples I purchased yesterday ! curious if mine have seeds.


    So am I. Theres a good chance some were picked early and gassed. Another pleasant thought.
    Chicagoland Chef du Jour
    Sun Feb 07, 2010 6:49 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    DiB's wrote:
    Vicki G. wrote:
    I'll have to check out the 'Jazz' apples I purchased yesterday ! curious if mine have seeds.


    So am I. Theres a good chance some were picked early and gassed. Another pleasant thought.



    EEEK, in any case my favorite apple. They seem to be available this time of year.

    I know I have had seeds in them before cuz I cut & slice into wedges for the kids. Just struck me as really odd & unique.
    LilKiwiChicken
    Mon Feb 08, 2010 2:00 am
    Food.com Groupie
    As much as I don't agree with Monsanto and how they do business....in this case the Jazz apple was developed in New Zealand and is simply a cross between a Braeburn and a Royal Gala apple. A grower developed it and the mark is owned by ENZA, which is New Zealand's pipfruit (mainly apples & pears) marketing board.

    You can grow apples from seed, however you probably will be more successful if you can graft some apple wood (scion) onto suitable rootstock. You'll get more apples more quickly and can guarantee the type of apple you're getting. Growing from seed is less successful and you also can't guarantee that after waiting for years that your apples will be of the same variety (I found this out when one of my windfalls got buried, sprouted, then finally produced an apple....which looked nothing like any of my other apples). This is due to hybridization. So, in some respects, the apple growers/exporters aren't giving you an advantage by letting you keep the seeds. The majority of apples available today are a cross of some sort. The organic heritage apples that I grow all descended from different varieties

    Re the seeds, it's believed that there is a recessive gene which causes this. So, your apple may be a mutant, just one of those things nature throws up from time to time. Seedless apples are thought to be desirable to growers as I think seed development in apples suppresses next year's flowers. My old apples definitely crop heavier in alternate years, regardless of how heavily I think them or prune them. Seedless apples also don't seem to attract codlin moth, which is a pain (one of my old trees has a bit of this). However, would consumers really want to eat a seedless apple (I guess it wouldn't seem the same).

    Apple markets around the world are changing and it seems that a lot of the apples that supermarkets want to sell just have to have good sweetness, be crisp, the right shape & colour, not have super thick skin and keep forever. I guess Jazz fits the bill there. I think they're perfectly lovely to eat, however it's not the same as picking an apple off the tree and eating it straight away. It's a shame that a lot of people don't get to have that experience anymore.
    Leggy Peggy
    Mon Feb 08, 2010 2:40 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Wow, thank you for that informative explanation.
    Where I live in Australia is very close to numerous apple orchards.
    So we enjoy eating just-picked apples for about four months a year.
    Chicagoland Chef du Jour
    Mon Feb 08, 2010 7:17 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Well, there you have it! Thanks Kiwi!

    Apples are plentiful (here) in the fall. Until then, everything is stored or imported.
    Happy Harry #2
    Mon Feb 08, 2010 11:18 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I LOVE it when I learn something new! Thanks for all that info, LilKiwi.
    LilKiwiChicken
    Tue Feb 09, 2010 3:49 am
    Food.com Groupie
    No worries, I find what we are doing with our food interesting (but scary too). Glad I could share something that I have learned.
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