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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Asian Cooking / Asian Fruit and Veg -- A Glossary -- Please Contribute
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    Asian Fruit and Veg -- A Glossary -- Please Contribute

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    Member #610488
    Mon Mar 22, 2010 1:33 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Rinshinomori wrote:
    Re salak, the skin is amazing looking. Very, very strange skin. Does not look like any food.


    My parents used to have a wooden bowl filled with wooden fruit that they received as a gift many years ago in Guam. It had one of the salaks and looking at the photo, it looked exactly like the picture - deep mahogany color. We never could figure out what it was so this was an eye opener for me as well.
    Vinho_Verde
    Tue Mar 23, 2010 1:26 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    this one is nice. does anyone know the latin name?
    Fool4Food
    Tue Mar 23, 2010 5:56 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Tamarind is also available in a sour paste form which is great in sauces and delicious in a refreshing summer drink.
    Fool4Food
    Tue Mar 23, 2010 6:03 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Celticevergreen wrote:
    Bitter Melon

    Also known as Bitter Gourd, Momordica charantia is a tropical and subtropical vine widely grown for edible fruit, which is among the most bitter of all fruits. The plant is grown mainly for the immature fruits although the young leaves and tips are edible. It is also a relative of squash, watermelon, muskmelon, and cucumber.


    We used to see these in the markets in our neighborhood and wonder what they were. The markets called them Kerala melon, and we never did figure out a use for them! Now I know!
    Leggy Peggy
    Tue Mar 23, 2010 6:22 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Hi Fool4Food -- welcome to the Asian Forum. wave.gif
    Thanks for mentioning Kerala melons. Had forgotten that completely.
    Leggy Peggy
    Tue Mar 23, 2010 6:26 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Vinho_Verde wrote:
    this one is nice. does anyone know the latin name?


    The link goes to a photo of something that looks like a thin-skinned and pale mangosteen, but I'm sure it's not. Any ideas anyone?
    Member #610488
    Wed Mar 24, 2010 2:05 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Leggy Peggy wrote:
    Vinho_Verde wrote:
    this one is nice. does anyone know the latin name?


    The link goes to a photo of something that looks like a thin-skinned and pale mangosteen, but I'm sure it's not. Any ideas anyone?


    Five lobed like that, it might be in the same family as mangosteen.
    Rinshinomori
    Wed Mar 24, 2010 10:02 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Vinho_Verde wrote:
    this one is nice. does anyone know the latin name?


    It may be langsat. Also called longkong in Thai.
    Vinho_Verde
    Wed Mar 24, 2010 11:23 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Rinshinomori wrote:
    Vinho_Verde wrote:
    this one is nice. does anyone know the latin name?


    It may be langsat. Also called longkong in Thai.


    indeed! thanks Rinshinomori.
    the latin name is Lansium domesticum. it's very juicy and sour. the peel oozes a white sticky sap. don't eat this fruit if you aren't near a water tap, soap, and napkins.

    source: http://www.bijlmakers.com/fruits/longkong.htm
    Rinshinomori
    Wed Mar 24, 2010 1:31 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Vinho_Verde wrote:
    Rinshinomori wrote:
    Vinho_Verde wrote:
    this one is nice. does anyone know the latin name?


    It may be langsat. Also called longkong in Thai.


    indeed! thanks Rinshinomori.
    the latin name is Lansium domesticum. it's very juicy and sour. the peel oozes a white sticky sap. don't eat this fruit if you aren't near a water tap, soap, and napkins.

    source: http://www.bijlmakers.com/fruits/longkong.htm


    Welcome Vinho_Verde! I think people should take heed of your advice (lol). Nice site you found listing tropical fruits. Thanks.
    Member #610488
    Wed Apr 07, 2010 12:46 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Durian



    Revered in southeast Asia as the "king of fruits", the durian is distinctive for its large size, unique odor, and formidable thorn-covered husk. The durian is believed to be native to Borneo and Sumatra. It is found wild or semi-wild in Myanmar and around villages in peninsular Malaya, and is commonly cultivated along roads or in orchards from southeastern India and Ceylon to New Guinea. There are 30 recognised Durio species, at least nine of which produce edible fruit.

    Durians are highly perishable. They are fully ripe 2 to 4 days after falling and lose eating quality in 5 or 6 days. The fruits are ovoid or ovoid-oblong to nearly round, 6 to 12 inches long, 5 to 6 inches wide, and up to 18 lbs in weight. The yellow or yellowish-green rind is thick, tough, semi-woody, and densely set with stout, sharply pointed spines, 3- to 7-sided at the base. Handling without gloves is not recommended. Inside the fruit, there are 5 compartments containing the creamy-white, yellowish, pinkish or orange-colored flesh and 1 to 7 chestnut-like seeds.

    The durian fruit is ready to eat when its husk begins to crack but the ideal stage of ripeness varies from region to region in Southeast Asia and by species. Some people prefer their durians relatively young when the clusters of fruit within the shell are still crisp in texture and mild in flavor. Others prefer for the fruit to be as soft and pungent in aroma as possible. Uncooked durian seeds are toxic and should not be ingested. Young leaves and shoots of the durian are occasionally cooked as greens.
    Rinshinomori
    Wed Apr 07, 2010 2:05 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Oooh, great photo Michael! I can lick the screen.
    Pinaygourmet #345142
    Wed Jan 19, 2011 12:02 am
    Semi-Experienced "Sous Chef" Poster
    I found this website about Asian ingredients, it lists the entries in alphabetical order and it also has a good collection of photos. Check this out! http://www.makantime.com/ingredientguide/index.htm
    Leggy Peggy
    Wed Jan 19, 2011 12:17 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Wow, that's a great website. Thanks.
    Chef #928625
    Sat Jan 22, 2011 7:40 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    Would anyone mind if i post entries without photos?sorry..having trouble with the computer...
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