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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Asian Cooking / Mung bean curd recipe? (mung bean tofu)
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    Mung bean curd recipe? (mung bean tofu)

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    Rameses
    Tue Jan 12, 2010 6:46 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    I am desparate for a mung bean curd recipe. I have scowered the internet with no avail. I know it exists, that much I have discovered, but finding the necessary ingredients and preparation is proving truly rigorous.

    If you have one I would be eternally greatful.

    Also other non-soy bean curd recipes would be beneficial except garbonzo bean because that I already know how to make. And please do not tell me to use seiten or something; that is not what I am asking for, thanks.
    Rinshinomori
    Tue Jan 12, 2010 3:00 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Rameses wrote:
    I am desparate for a mung bean curd recipe. I have scowered the internet with no avail. I know it exists, that much I have discovered, but finding the necessary ingredients and preparation is proving truly rigorous.

    If you have one I would be eternally greatful.

    Also other non-soy bean curd recipes would be beneficial except garbonzo bean because that I already know how to make. And please do not tell me to use seiten or something; that is not what I am asking for, thanks.


    Hello Ramenses wave.gif very interesting. Especially today as I'm getting ready to make two of my regular tofu.

    I assume you can make regular tofu? I ask this question because I'm wondering if the technique is not the same.

    For example - soak beans, grate the beans, take out the dregs, heat the milk (is there such thing as mung bean milk - I don't know?), add coagulant, let it set, and form.

    You mentioned you make garbanzo beans tofu. Can you provide a recipe for this? Is this similar to making soybean tofu? Or different?

    I make different tofu like items - popular in Japan using walnuts, eggs, pistachio, sesame seeds, etc, but they just _look_ like tofu - made from using kanten like products.

    Can you please tell me where you heard of this product and any photo online?
    Member #610488
    Wed Jan 13, 2010 12:57 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Mung Beans can be made into tofu - basically follow the same recipe as for soy tofu but use a 1.5% calcium sulfate dosage as the coagulant. Mung Beans are very full of water so you will find the pressing to be more liquidy than when making regular soy tofu. This comes from an article in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry.

    Yes, there is something called mung bean milk because I ran across a soymilk maker that also makes mung bean milk as well.
    Mia in Germany
    Wed Jan 13, 2010 12:30 pm
    Forum Host
    That's interesting. My soymilkmaker gives a recipe for rice-mung bean milk, but when I tried to make it, it came out as a horrible watery mess which smelled absolutely disgusting.
    I'll have to look that up.
    And like Nona I'd be very interested in garbanzo tofu, too!
    Member #610488
    Thu Jan 14, 2010 12:24 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Mia in Germany wrote:
    a recipe for rice-mung bean milk, but when I tried to make it, it came out as a horrible watery mess which smelled absolutely disgusting.


    Sounds like you made something similar to mung bean water, the stuff only Beijingers could love.

    Also there is mung bean popsicles in China, probably made with mung bean milk.
    Mia in Germany
    Thu Jan 14, 2010 2:51 am
    Forum Host
    Celticevergreen wrote:


    Also there is mung bean popsicles in China, probably made with mung bean milk.


    icon_eek.gif
    I think I'll not try making mung bean milk again...
    Rinshinomori
    Fri Jan 15, 2010 4:49 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Mia in Germany wrote:
    Celticevergreen wrote:


    Also there is mung bean popsicles in China, probably made with mung bean milk.


    icon_eek.gif
    I think I'll not try making mung bean milk again...


    LOL - it does sound rather unappetizing.

    Not sure how much protein is there in mung beans compared to soy beans. Soy milk coagulates because of the protein. I've used several types of coagulant in making tofu - various types and I find natural nigari from sea makes the best tasting tofu.

    I saw two photos of mung bean tofu posted in Japan by a small tofu maker. Unfortunately they no longer carry them and I cannot upload the photos. They must used the green mung beans because the color of these tofu were quite pretty - very light green tinge to them. One was quite flat looking and the other, the normal sized tofu. I do not know though if other jelling ingredients were used.
    kwlabear
    Mon Feb 01, 2010 12:11 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I, too would like the garbanzo bean tofu recipe, mostly due to soy allergies. I'm also trying to find things to sub for soy sauce (and soy substitutes are just nasty). Would balsamic vinegar work? I know it would be kind of a fusion, but interesting.
    Mia in Germany
    Mon Feb 01, 2010 1:13 am
    Forum Host
    kwlabear wrote:
    I, too would like the garbanzo bean tofu recipe, mostly due to soy allergies. I'm also trying to find things to sub for soy sauce (and soy substitutes are just nasty). Would balsamic vinegar work? I know it would be kind of a fusion, but interesting.


    Wouldn't Bragg's Liquid Aminos be a sub for soy sauce?
    Karyl Lee
    Mon Feb 01, 2010 4:48 pm
    Forum Host
    Bragg's contains soy, so it's not a sub for soy sauce.
    Mia in Germany
    Tue Feb 02, 2010 12:23 am
    Forum Host
    Good to know, thanks! And I wondered why it doesn't agree with me... icon_sad.gif
    Member #610488
    Tue Feb 02, 2010 1:24 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Ran across this Burmese/Myanmar Chickpea recipe for everyone to add to their files. No reason not to use mung bean flour and make it similar.

    3 cups Chick-pea flour(Pare Hmont)(Garam Dhal Powder)
    15 cups water
    1 tsp. vegetable oil
    1/4 tsp. ground tumeric (yellow powder)
    1 tsp. salt


    Mix the chick-pea flour and water together with a whisk or eggbeater. Let stand overnight, about 12 hours.

    Next day, strain the mixture through a thin cotton cloth slowly. Scrape out the residue from the cloth and discard it. Let the balance of the liquid settle for 3 hours.

    With a soup ladle, carefully remove 6 cups of liquid from the top of the mixture without disturbing the balance. Discard the 6 cups liquid you have removed.

    Rub the bottom of a large pan with the oil. Pour in almost all of the balance of the liquid (9 cups) and add the turmeric and salt. What remains in the original pan is thick chick-pea sludge, about a cup. This should be reserved in a bowl for future use.

    Bring to a boil the 9 cups of liquid and cook over moderate heat for 30 minutes, stirring continuously. At this time, add the chick-pea sludge, which is a thickening agent, and continue to cook over low heat for 10 minutes more, stirring the thick mixture firmly. Remove the pan from heat.

    Turn out the mixture into a tray 12x4 inches and 3 inches deep, lined with a clean, cotton cloth. Cool completely, uncovered, overnight. At this stage, you may slice the firm tofu into pieces of whatever size you wish. It is ready to use.
    Rinshinomori
    Tue Feb 02, 2010 7:38 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Michael thank you - this recipe looks very interesting. I have chickpea flour and I may attempt to make half of this recipe. Kind of reminds me of polenta. icon_biggrin.gif
    GLCossey
    Sun Sep 09, 2012 2:35 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    I have been scouring the net this week for soy alternates as well, but only to have some variety though. My wife is on a very strict diet for insulin resistance recovery and cannot have grains, starchy or sugary vegetables or dairy for a few weeks.

    From what I read the above Burmese recipe also works with yellow pea flour.
    Rinshinomori
    Mon Sep 10, 2012 6:57 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    You know I thought about this question and more I think about it I think it's very hard to make tofu with the same method as soy beans because of it's protein content ie coagulating. However, in Japan we make many other tofu such as sesame tofu, egg tofu, peanut tofu, walnut tofu, etc and basically these are not made the same way as making tofu ie coagulation. It's made with thickeners.

    Which means that these cannot be used the same way as regular soy bean tofu, but they are wonderful with sauce drizzled over the top etc. I regularly make sesame tofu which is very common type of tofu in Japan. It's made with thickener called kudzuko (kudzu flour).

    Here is sesame tofu:

    Peanut tofu

    And finally egg tofu:
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