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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Recipe Requests - General / What is kupehope?
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    What is kupehope?

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    pinky kookie
    Thu Jan 17, 2013 4:17 pm
    Food.com Groupie

    Hi Chef Koechin,
    And continuing with the German mystery recipe, I just found this very similar one, with all the ingredients from the Chef's description above included, (except for the 2 eggs instead of 12 yolks and the flour added), that maybe can help the Chef to figure out the incomplete recipe from the late Great Aunt, and can solve this mystery. icon_biggrin.gif icon_wink.gif

    I guess you have seen or tasted this delicious potato pancakes before in Germany, and here it is for you to check it out:

    MÜNSTERLÄNDER STRUVEN - WESTPHALIAN RECIPE -
    The Traditional German Good Friday dish - very special potato pancakes!
    Ingredients:
    500 g raw, grated potatoes
    500 g flour
    0.375 litres of lukewarm milk
    2 eggs
    40 g fresh yeast
    100 g sugar
    30 g liquid butter
    1 pinch of salt and pepper
    zest of 1 unsprayed lemon
    125 g raisins
    rapeseed oil for deep frying
    cinnamon-sugar

    Preparation:
    Crumble the yeast into the lukewarm milk. Place the flour into the middle of it. Cover it with a towel. Let the dough rise in a warm place.
    Add the sugar, the butter, the lemon zest and the eggs. Knead it all thoroughly. Lastly, carefully mix the raisins into the dough. Let the dough rise for another 30 minutes. At this point it is just a normal yeast dough.
    In the meantime: grate the peeled potatoes. Put them onto a kitchen towel. Press the liquid out of them. Knead the dough again. Then blend it with the grated potatoes. Let the result rest and rise another time.
    Then form and bake pancakes of medium size. Dredge them in cinnamon-sugar.
    Serving suggestion: Serve immediately. Actually a main course, but not every day is a Good Friday!


    Last edited by pinky kookie on Fri Jan 18, 2013 9:07 pm, edited 3 times in total
    pinky kookie
    Thu Jan 17, 2013 4:31 pm
    Food.com Groupie

    And speaking of Bavaria Chef Koechin, this is another similar recipe but with NO potatoes and raisins included. Take a look:

    BAVARIAN YEAST DUMPLINGS RECIPE
    Fluffy, delicate dessert. A delicious temptation.
    Ingredients
    500 g of flour
    70 g of sugar
    200 ml of warm milk
    100 g of warm butter
    2 eggs
    1 packet of fresh yeast
    a pinch of salt

    Preparation
    Fundamental: For the success of a good yeast dough, it is extremely important that the temperature of the kitchen, as well as the ingredients, is 22-23º so that the yeast dough rises well. Thereafter, is the process very easy!. Warm the milk, sugar and butter in a saucepan until 60-70º and then add the yeast.
    Create a hollow in the centre of the flour and pour the milk and sugar mixture into it slowly. Mix in the flour slowly until a smooth dough is created. Then add the eggs and mix.
    Cover the bowl containing the mixture with a clean, dry kitchen cloth and place in a warm part of the kitchen. In front of an open oven door for example. Allow to stand for 20 minutes. The yeast dough will rise, remove from bowl and work through the dough again.
    Roll out until approximately 1.5 cm thick. With a cookie cutter or a coffee cup, press-out round cookies and then roll into little balls. (approximately 3-4cm in diameter).
    Butter a casserole dish thoroughly and then place the little dough balls next to each other onto it. Allow to stand for another 15-20 minutes.
    With a mixture of milk, butter, sugar and vanilla essence, cover the dough balls lightly (approximately 250ml) with the mixture. Place in a preheated oven (160-170ºC) for 20 minutes. Allow the dumplings to go a little golden-brown on top. Remove from the oven and top with icing sugar and serve.
    Serving suggestion:
    Serve with vanilla sauce, vanilla ice-cream, sour cherry sauce, strawberries, raspberries or stewed plum sauce.


    1Steve
    Thu Jan 17, 2013 5:32 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Koechin (Chef) wrote:
    I have eaten many a Kugelhopf, while living for a while in Bavaria and watching the Bauerin (farmer's wife) making them. However i have never seen a recipe using potatoes or Anis flavored cookies.
    All the ingredients in this recipe are wrong for this type of cake.
    Sure wished that i could help solve this mystery! icon_biggrin.gif wave.gif


    Found one using Potatoes:

    Recipe for the Old-Fashioned Potato-Raisin Gugelhupf

    Ingredients for the Gugelhupf

    400 grams (14.10 ounces) waxy potatoes, cooked with the peel on.and cooled, then peeled and grated on the small grates of your box grater - (after you have peeled them, you will be left with about 300 grams/10.5 ounces)
    300 grams (10.5 ounces) plain/AP flour, plus some for the pan
    1 package instant yeast
    100 grams (3.5 ounces) superfine white sugar
    1 package pure vanilla sugar (such as Dr. Oetker Natural Vanilla Sugar) or 2 tsp pure vanilla extract
    one pinch fine salt (I used fine sea salt)
    3 eggs (M), preferably free range or organic, room temperature
    100 grams (3.5 ounces) unsalted butter, room temperature, plus some for the pan
    125 grams (4.4 ounces) raisins soaked in warm rum or apple juice for about twenty minutes, drained


    Ingredients for the Butter Glaze

    50 grams unsalted butter, melted



    Ingredients for the Chocolate Glaze

    100 grams (3.5 ounces) dark chocolate, chopped
    3 tbsp unsalted butter
    1 tbsp golden syrup (or light corn syrup)
    1/4 tsp pure vanilla extract



    Equipment

    one 10 cup Gugelhupf or Bundt pan
    pastry brushes

    Preparation of the Gugelhupf

    1. Preheat your oven to 180 degrees Celsius (350 degrees Fahrenheit).
    2. Butter and flour the Gugelhupf pan, knocking out any excess flour.
    3. In the bowl of your mixer, carefully whisk together the flour with the instant yeast.
    4. To the flour mixture add the sugar, vanilla sugar (or extract), salt, eggs and butter and mix for about two minutes until the cake batter is smooth.
    5. Switch to a spatula and gently add the grated potatoes and raisins to the batter.
    6. Transfer the batter to the pan and with a small offset spatula, smooth the top of the batter.
    7. Bake for about 45 minutes or until a cake tester inserted in the cake comes out clean, or with only a few crumbs attached.
    8. When the cake is done, transfer it to a wire rack to cool for about ten minutes.
    9. After ten minutes, turn out the cake, heat the remaining butterjust until melted and brush the warm butter over the warm cake. Cool the cake completely on the wire rack.

    Preparation of the Chocolate Glaze

    1. In a double boiler over hot, but not boiling water, combine chopped chocolate, butter, and golden syrup.
    2. Stir until chocolate is melted and mixture is smooth, then add vanilla.
    3. Spread warm glaze over top of cake, letting it drizzle down the sides.
    1Steve
    Thu Jan 17, 2013 5:47 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Also found this bread recipe that contains both anise and potatoes but the name is not close and baked in a coffee can:
    http://library.ndsu.edu/grhc/foods/recipe/swift.html
    Koechin (Chef)
    Thu Jan 17, 2013 6:09 pm
    Forum Host
    Oh, my goodness! The Yeast dumplings bring back such good memories. I have not had them since I was very young. Never in the USA.
    The other recipe I never heard of or tASTED, BUT IT SOUNDS GOO.Thanks for sharing. icon_smile.gif icon_smile.gif wave.gif
    Molly53
    Mon Jan 28, 2013 1:37 pm
    Forum Host
    Peppernise is probably nutmeg.

    My German friend took a look at this and suggests that if Gramma wrote out her recipe in archaic German cursive, some of the letters could be misread as something else. The first P in kupehope, for example, might really be a German Z . Take a look at this posting on Uncle Phaedrus and see if it wouldn't apply to your request (particularly if some of the eggs were used to make a custard filling, although my friend doesn't agree with that): http://www.hungrybrowser.com/phaedrus/m110702.htm#2

    Given so many dialects and archaic German cursive, it's rather an important hint to know where in the old country your gramma's family originated.
    1Steve
    Mon Jan 28, 2013 5:50 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Molly53 wrote:
    Peppernise is probably nutmeg.

    My German friend took a look at this and suggests that if Gramma wrote out her recipe in archaic German cursive, some of the letters could be misread as something else. The first P in kupehope, for example, might really be a German Z . Take a look at this posting on Uncle Phaedrus and see if it wouldn't apply to your request (particularly if some of the eggs were used to make a custard filling, although my friend doesn't agree with that): http://www.hungrybrowser.com/phaedrus/m110702.htm#2

    Given so many dialects and archaic German cursive, it's rather an important hint to know where in the old country your gramma's family originated.


    icon_redface.gif Molly after reading you explanation about the P being a Z I tried Googleing "Kuzehoze". Google then asked me if I meant "kazehouse". Having no idea what that meant I said OK! Big mistake! I don't know what it means, but it sent me to a bunch of links to Porn written in German! icon_redface.gif
    Koechin (Chef)
    Tue Jan 29, 2013 12:37 pm
    Forum Host
    It was talking about A Katzen Haus icon_biggrin.gif icon_evil.gif a.k.a. Cat house. No wonder you were linked to Porn. This is serious, but also vrey funny! rotfl.gif;wave:
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