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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Asian Cooking / Show and tell Asian recipes you made here
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    Show and tell Asian recipes you made here

    Go to page << Previous Page  1, 2, 3, ... 21, 22, 23  Next Page >>
    AmandaInOz
    Mon Sep 28, 2009 8:26 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Another PAC recipe: drbecca26's Ginger Noodles. yummy.gif

    Rinshinomori
    Tue Sep 29, 2009 3:16 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    powerplantop wrote:
    Gom Tang Korean Ox Tail soup

    Start with oxtails sections and a few soup bones. In this batch I had three pounds of soup bones and eight pounds of ox tail sections.

    Soak the bones for two hours changing the water when it gets bloody.

    Boil the bones for twenty or thirty minutes, drain and wash the bones.

    Put bones back in pot with a one inch price of ginger and six cloves of garlic boil again for two hours. (Skim any scum and keep adding water.) Remove ox tail sections and let cool. Remove meat from most ox tail sections put bones back in pot. Save a few with meat for serving. Cook another one to three hours. Season the meat with soy sauce, sesame oil, red pepper powder, green onion, garlic and sesame seeds. On saved section trim excess fat and make cuts so that it easier to remove meat.

    Put saved sections in small pot with some of the broth from the main pot. (add more water to the main pot and keep cooking). Cook save sections for about one hour then add a few noodles ( I like the same ones used for Chap Chae).

    Regular version: Put oxtail sections in bowl with a few noodles then add broth. Add green onions and salt to taste.


    Version with spiced meat: Put some of the spices meat with a few noodles then add broth. Salt to taste.


    Very, very nice powerplantop! I love Korean food and this one looks great. Recently I posted a Chinese hand pulled noodle photos and your soup reminds me of it. The ingredients are quite similar minus sesame oil (I think).

    Is the redness to the soup coming from kimchi or chili pepper?

    Looking forward to more of your photos and thank you for stopping by wave.gif
    powerplantop
    Tue Sep 29, 2009 3:48 pm
    Semi-Experienced "Sous Chef" Poster
    The redness is from the chilie powder.
    Rinshinomori
    Tue Sep 29, 2009 3:51 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    AmandaInOz wrote:
    Another PAC recipe: drbecca26's Ginger Noodles. yummy.gif



    Another lovely photo Amanda! I love soba.

    About a week ago I made zaru soba using homemade tare of mine along with chicken sukiyaki and several other dishes for my dad's birthday dinner. I was sooo busy cooking that I had no time to photograph - next time. My comfort food when sick is zaru soba and miso soup.

    For topping chilled noodles I minced green onion, grated ginger, grated daikon, grated wasabi and thinly sliced nori like this (this one was taken in Japan):



    I've been sick the last 4 days from cold or flu and have not been cooking much except to make tuna fish sandwich, zaru soba, and albondigas soup. But tonight I am planning on making some korroke and plan on taking some pictures of our dinner.
    Rinshinomori
    Tue Sep 29, 2009 4:55 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    powerplantop wrote:
    The redness is from the chilie powder.


    I forgot to ask another question. What is the bowl with something white? Salt for dipping meat?
    AmandaInOz
    Tue Sep 29, 2009 5:13 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Rinshinomori wrote:



    I've been sick the last 4 days from cold or flu and have not been cooking much except to make tuna fish sandwich, zaru soba, and albondigas soup. But tonight I am planning on making some korroke and plan on taking some pictures of our dinner.

    Hope you feel better soon!!

    That zaru soba looks delicious and comforting. icon_smile.gif
    Rinshinomori
    Wed Sep 30, 2009 11:44 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Thanks Amanda. Much appreciated.

    I made korroke for dinner. Korroke is basically cooked potato, ground beef, and onion/garlic patties deep fried served with tonkatsuku sauce. It is always served with thinly sliced cabbage on the side.

    I've been making korroke for a long time now and I still remember the first time I made them because I did not refrigerate the mixture/patties and they disintegrated in hot oil.

    These were made with addition of curry powder and roasted and minced red peppers. Normally I use either fresh homemade panko or store bought but decided to use frozen homemade panko (thawed). That did not work too good and won't be doing that again. Frozen bread crumbs are ok for many uses, but not for frying like this.

    Before being formed


    After they are cooled a bit the mixture is made into oval patties and refrigerated for at least 2-3 hours.


    After frying:


    Another thing I've been making off and on (trying to perfect but still not to my expectation) is this kasutera. This one is about 80-85% ok. Maybe one day it will be 100%

    powerplantop
    Wed Sep 30, 2009 8:30 pm
    Semi-Experienced "Sous Chef" Poster
    Tonkotsu Ramen that I made.

    The broth / soup was made by boiling pig feet for several hours. Served with slices of boiled / seasoned pork, green onion and spicy miso.

    powerplantop
    Wed Sep 30, 2009 8:34 pm
    Semi-Experienced "Sous Chef" Poster
    Korean Fried Chicken Wings Soy and Garlic Version

    Sauce: soften small onion in a tablespoon of oil.
    Add 2 cloves garlic (minced),
    cup soy sauce,
    cup mirin,
    2 tablespoons brown sugar,
    2 slices ginger.
    Simmer 2 minutes, remove from heat and let steep.

    Salt and pepper 2 dozen chicken wings.

    Dredge in corn starch fry in batches until they start to brown.

    After all wings have been fried the first time fry them again until they are golden brown.

    Coat wings with sauce (reheat and strain before coating wings).

    Rinshinomori
    Thu Oct 01, 2009 12:17 am
    Food.com Groupie
    These look great powerplantop! I love tonkotsu stock very much. Your noodle looks quite thick for ramen noodle. What type of noodle did you use?

    The chicken looks wonderful too. However, I'm planning on making your spicier version using kochujang. That one looks very nice.

    Thank you for sharing these yummy dishes with us wave.gif
    powerplantop
    Thu Oct 01, 2009 8:03 am
    Semi-Experienced "Sous Chef" Poster
    Rinshinomori wrote:
    These look great powerplantop! I love tonkotsu stock very much. Your noodle looks quite thick for ramen noodle. What type of noodle did you use?


    These are what I was able to find localy (Memphis, TN).

    Rinshinomori wrote:
    The chicken looks wonderful too. However, I'm planning on making your spicier version using kochujang. That one looks very nice.

    Thank you for sharing these yummy dishes with us wave.gif


    Both of those wing recipes are good. It just depends upon which one I want that night. My Dr Pepper wings are also good. All of them get good reviews on you tube.
    Rinshinomori
    Thu Oct 01, 2009 8:47 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    You have a very nice presence on youtube. I'll try to check out all our videos. icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif

    What you have there is udon - made from wheat flour.
    powerplantop
    Fri Oct 02, 2009 7:33 am
    Semi-Experienced "Sous Chef" Poster
    Thank you.

    The noodles while not what I would have used if I could have gotten the real thing they did have a very nice texture.
    Mandy ny
    Tue Oct 06, 2009 1:15 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Hi My name is Mandy and my DH is half Korean. His mom died when he was very young and he does not know his father. He remembers some of the food and would love for me to make it. We have searched but have no idea what we are looking for. He said she made something with rice wraped in sea weed. Also some kind of squid chips, he remembered and loved. If you could help me to find what these are so I could make them I would be very grateful. Thanks alot Mandy icon_surprised.gif
    Mandy ny
    Tue Oct 06, 2009 1:17 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    This home made Korroke? Is it Good? Just cook it up. Is there a sauce or dip to dip it in, or do we just eat it? Thanks Mandy
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