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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Recipe Requests - General / Need recipe for Rochettes beans, Lowell, Massachusetts
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    Need recipe for Rochettes beans, Lowell, Massachusetts

    Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next Page >>
    Chef Tippy Toe
    Wed Jun 25, 2008 10:37 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    If anyone has this recipe please let me know. I have moved to NC and I miss having Rochettes beans on Saturdays when I lived there.
    Molly53
    Wed Jun 25, 2008 11:40 am
    Forum Host
    Chef Tippy Toe wrote:
    If anyone has this recipe please let me know. I have moved to NC and I miss having Rochettes beans on Saturdays when I lived there.
    Howdy and welcome to 'zaar, Tippy. It's GREAT to meet a new friend.

    It would be helpful if you would give as many details about the recipe as you can...someone might know it by another name.
    Chef Tippy Toe
    Wed Jun 25, 2008 12:00 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    All I can tell is that they were made by the Rochette family and are famous in Lowell, MA. They were some type of white bean possibly navy beans and were cooked long and slow and served with a side of pork fat (maybe salt pork).

    It isn't much to go on Sorry.
    Molly53
    Wed Jun 25, 2008 12:20 pm
    Forum Host
    Click on Bill Knapp's Michigan Bean Soup and see if it will work for you.

    If you give it a try, recipe reviews are very much appreciated.

    Otherwise, from the web:
    Bingo! Here's what they said (and they did say that it has been advertised in the Lowell Sun a few times). Use loads of water (people really go wrong here and don't use enough like if the beans are up say 4 inches up the pot you want the water up beyond the beans by a good 8 or 9 inches) they absorb like sponges (many people burn beans). Use 3lb of salt pork to 8 lbs of of a good california small white bean (again- two important things that people don't do). Most people don't use enough salt pork (again, they absorb the flavor so if you don't use enough they don't absorb enough of the flavor of the salt pork - and don't use anything but salt pork, don't substitute salt butt or something else he said). Also, he said people mess up by using bigger beans and they get soggy. VERY VERY IMPORTANT - he cooks them for a good 9 hrs in a big pot!!! Oh, and a squirt of ketchup - that's it. I hope he didn't skip anything. Good luck.
    Chef Tippy Toe
    Wed Jun 25, 2008 12:29 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Molly53, Thank you so much that sounds like the exact recipe I do recall that they used very small amount of ketchup. Have a great day!!
    Red Apple Guy
    Wed Jun 25, 2008 6:50 pm
    Forum Host
    Rochette’s Beans (from http://www.chowhound.com/topics/349834)

    Lowell's Famous Rochett's Baked Beans

    2 lbs California pea beans or any dried white pea beans
    1 ½ teaspoons salt
    1 lb salt pork - cut in 2-inch squares
    ¼ cup ketchup

    Wash beans thoroughly. Drain and pour into 4 ½ quart
    Bean pot. Add pork, ketchup, salt and a little water.
    Stir to mix thoroughly. Add enough water to come up
    2 inches from the top of the pot. Cover pot and cook for
    5 hours at 350 degrees. Remove lid and cover beans
    with ½ inch of water. Continue baking beans uncovered
    for 2 hours more, or until the salt pork is cooked to taste

    Makes 8 to 10 servings.
    Chef Tippy Toe
    Thu Jun 26, 2008 6:44 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Thanks so much Red Apple Guy!!! The recipe is the next best thing to beong back in Lowell!!
    Mr.Mom #2
    Thu Jun 26, 2008 8:23 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Red Apple Guy wrote:
    Rochette’s Beans (from http://www.chowhound.com/topics/349834)

    Lowell's Famous Rochett's Baked Beans

    2 lbs California pea beans or any dried white pea beans
    1 ½ teaspoons salt
    1 lb salt pork - cut in 2-inch squares
    ¼ cup ketchup

    Wash beans thoroughly. Drain and pour into 4 ½ quart
    Bean pot. Add pork, ketchup, salt and a little water.
    Stir to mix thoroughly. Add enough water to come up
    2 inches from the top of the pot. Cover pot and cook for
    5 hours at 350 degrees. Remove lid and cover beans
    with ½ inch of water. Continue baking beans uncovered
    for 2 hours more, or until the salt pork is cooked to taste

    Makes 8 to 10 servings.

    Hey Apple Guy, these look a little like the canned Pork & Beans I grew up on. Any similarity, other than the obvious freshness of home cooked?
    Curious,
    Spencer
    Red Apple Guy
    Thu Jun 26, 2008 9:55 am
    Forum Host
    Hey Spencer,
    Pork and Beans usually have a bunch of sugar in them.
    Homemade Pork and Beans, Slow Cook Method (GF)

    I haven't tried the Rochette's recipe, I just looked it up.
    Muffin Goddess
    Thu Jun 26, 2008 8:05 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Chef Tippy Toe wrote:
    All I can tell is that they were made by the Rochette family and are famous in Lowell, MA. They were some type of white bean possibly navy beans and were cooked long and slow and served with a side of pork fat (maybe salt pork).

    It isn't much to go on Sorry.


    Are these the beans from Cote's Market? Sooo good! Even better when you add a spoonful each of dijon mustard and horseradish. Mom buys them every once in a while, along with their salmon pie and fresh bread. I've yet to come across any beans anywhere else that are comparable. You have to get there early for the beans, though -- they tend to sell out.

    icon_biggrin.gif
    chef #910672
    Sat Aug 02, 2008 4:35 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    OMG, I lived in Lowell, MA and often remember how good those beans were. Awesome, now I can share this with my good friends in Louisville, KY while tailgaiting University of Louisville football games.
    Chef #933812
    Mon Aug 25, 2008 12:24 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Thank you so much for the recipe for Rochettes beans. I use to go there every Saturday from New Hampshire just for their beans. I've been looking for a recipe for any kind of white baked bean for years.
    Bonnie (Hillsboro New Hampshire)
    Chef #935903
    Wed Aug 27, 2008 8:30 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Kathy at Recipezaar: Advertisement Link Removed
    Chef #969044
    Fri Sep 26, 2008 6:49 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    These are in fact the very same beans that are sold at Cote's Market. Rochelles is but a vague memory to me, but i so remember getting them awesome beans when Roller Skating at the High Hat.

    In my opinion, the recipe in this article is very close to genuine. However, i see no mention of soaking the beans by themselves in water overnight. And that i think, is an important step.
    Chef #933812
    Tue Sep 30, 2008 8:56 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    I was also surprised that the beans are not soaked overnight. I'm also surprised that there is no sugar of any kind. Has anyone tried his recipe yet?
    Bonnie - Hillsborough, NH
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