Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Canning, Preserving and Dehydrating / Dehydrated sweet/white potatoes
    Lost? Site Map

    Dehydrated sweet/white potatoes

    JustStartingOut
    Sun May 04, 2008 3:05 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    After seeing the post in the "Craziest thing dehydrated" thread I got to thinking about how perfect it would be to just dehydrate sweet and/or white potatoes to make instant potatoes. Has anyone tried either? Can you tell the difference between the "instant" and regular?

    Do you just dehydrate and reconsitute like on the potato box (basically 1:1 potato:water ratio with a hint of butter)?

    I have a bunch of potatoes growing this year, and my sweet potatoes should be going in soon, and this would be infinitely easier to just have instant in a jar in the cupboard rather than all those containers of mashed in the freezer! I may just have to go out and get a few potatoes and test it out!
    Chubby Cook
    Sun May 04, 2008 4:49 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    JustStartingOut wrote:
    After seeing the post in the "Craziest thing dehydrated" thread I got to thinking about how perfect it would be to just dehydrate sweet and/or white potatoes to make instant potatoes. Has anyone tried either? Can you tell the difference between the "instant" and regular?

    I haven't tried sweet potatoes, but according to the official book, precook at 300 F until soft but firm (no time given), or with peeled, uncooked slices, steam-blanch for 8-10 minutes then dip slices in lemon juice to retain color. Then dehydrate.

    Regular Potatoes are about the same, but only need to boil the slices for about 5 minutes and then dip in a solution of 1/4 cup lemon juice in 2 cups water. Dehydrate.

    To make "instant" mashed potatoes you actually dehydrate real mashed potatoes.

    I'm not really sure why the pre-cooking or blanching is a needed step. I would think the heat from the actual dehydrating process would be sufficient, but perhaps someone else has a proper answer.

    I have made instant hash browns by just shredding a bunch of potatoes, rinsing in water/lemon juice, patting dry, and then dehydrating. They rehydrate beautifully with just boiling water.
    Violet #2
    Mon May 05, 2008 1:16 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    When you blanch foods it retards enzymes that cause spoilage microorganisms.
    Also will help keep foods from turning brown when drying. It is also going to speed up the drying time.
    JustStartingOut
    Mon May 05, 2008 1:25 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Good to know! Thanks!

    I was thinking of just making up the mashed potatoes/sweet potatoes and then spreading the mashed on the trays (I have fruit roll up liners) and powdering it after it dries. Would that work?
    Violet #2
    Wed May 07, 2008 2:12 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I have not tried to dry and powder them. If you do try, do not add milk, butter, etc. That will allow bacteria to grow and could cause serious food borne illness. It would need to be just plain potatoes, nothing added other than salt or dried herbs, etc.
    Most people dry sliced potatoes or shredded.
    JustStartingOut
    Wed May 07, 2008 1:01 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Violet #2 wrote:
    I have not tried to dry and powder them. If you do try, do not add milk, butter, etc. That will allow bacteria to grow and could cause serious food borne illness. It would need to be just plain potatoes, nothing added other than salt or dried herbs, etc.
    Most people dry sliced potatoes or shredded.


    Thanks. I was planning to dry them "plain" (ie without butter/milk) anyway.

    I guess I'll just have to experiment with a few potatoes from the grocery store to find the best method for me.

    My concern with sliced potatoes is that they might discolor before I could get them dry enough, even if I do pre-cook. I had that happen with some french fries I attempted and had to toss the whole batch because they turned brown and foul looking after cooking before they could freeze.
    Violet #2
    Wed May 07, 2008 5:39 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Try using a citric acid solution to presoak them in. You could also try Fruit Fresh, which is ascorbic acid. There is some chemical you can buy, too, but I don't remember the name of it now. It is something "white".
    JustStartingOut
    Sun May 11, 2008 11:15 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Well, I tried out dehydrating some Yukon Gold potatoes yesterday, along with a sweet potato and I have to say I'm disappointed. The Yukon Gold potatoes looked great when they were pulverized into powder, but after rehydrating were foul beyond belief, which I was really surprised about since they're normally wonderful in their "true" form. I haven't gotten up the courage yet to try the sweet potatoes reconstituted.

    I dehydrated the mashed potatoes on my solid leather trays and then pulverized them into a powder in my blender. Perhaps that's what caused the problem? Should I have not pulverized them?
    E-mail me when someone replies to this
    Add this to My Favorite Topics
    Alert us of inappropriate posts

    Free Weekly Newsletter

    Get the latest recipes and tips delivered right to your inbox.

    Your e-mail is safe. Privacy Policy
    Advertisement

    Ideas from Food.com

    Powered by phpBB 2.0.1 © 2002 phpBB Group

    Over 475,000 Recipes

    Food.com Network of Sites