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    hair loss???

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    Chef #807468
    Thu Apr 10, 2008 1:48 am
    Regular "Line Cook" Poster
    Oh, i've seen doctors and had every kind of test run, believe me.
    every kind of thyriod, looked at by several doctors, hormone panels, specific hair loss panels, and the upper endoscopy/biopsy.
    the only thing that's every come back abnormal was low iron.
    i took a super strong iron supplement for a while.

    I realize gluten is not an essential nutrient, but that is actually why i believe it might be the problem. from what i've researched online, anemia is the result of gluten blocking the absorption of iron, and in addition, other essential nutrients.
    also that wheat itself hinders the absorption of zinc, which may also cause hair loss.

    I've been avoiding wheat for the past ~3 days, and i have noticed a difference in the way i feel. i have alot of the symptoms of wheat sensitivity, so i figure what have i got to loose by trying a wheat gluten free diet? I've explored just about every other option i can think of.
    while I'm at it, i'm also trying to stay away from sugar in general, as i think i also have a sensitivity to that, and/or candidiasis which has similar symptoms, and feeds off excess sugar, including grains.

    Most, well, all doctors tell me mine is genetic hair loss.
    while i know it might be true, sometimes you just have to listen to your body that something just might be wrong.
    like i read somewhere, maybe it's not necessarily genetic hairloss, but genetic wheat sensitivity. it is worth it to me to find out. if this doesn't work, i think i will have exhausted all avenues, and i'll just settle for a wig if it comes to that.

    only one way to find out i guess...
    Chef# 616082
    Thu Apr 10, 2008 2:04 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Great Attitude!
    Nobody knows your body like you do.
    I heard or read a good analogy recently. You can put the very best high octane fuel in your car but if it's supposed to run on diesel it won't run well.
    The fact the some types of autism are cured by avoiding gluten and dairy and most arthritis is helped by avoiding nightshade vegetables tells you how important getting our diets right for us is.
    Any honest Doctor will tell you that there is no real baseline for normal hormone levels, because everyone is different. Taking thyrosense and essential fatty acids and avoiding gluten will only help.
    **Jubes**
    Thu Apr 10, 2008 4:27 am
    Forum Host
    Quote:
    [quote="Chef #807468"]
    I've been avoiding wheat for the past ~3 days, and i have noticed a difference in the way i feel. i have alot of the symptoms of wheat sensitivity, so i figure what have i got to loose by trying a wheat gluten free diet? I've explored just about every other option i can think of.
    while I'm at it, i'm also trying to stay away from sugar in general, as i think i also have a sensitivity to that, and/or candidiasis which has similar symptoms, and feeds off excess sugar, including grains.


    Chef #807468

    It sure sounds as though you have had all the medical tests/issues ruled out already.
    As you have already realised there is no blood test or biopsy test for individuals food intolerances. Food intolerances can cause all sorts of issues.

    The only way to realise a food intolerance is to eliminate it totally from your diet. After a few weeks ....then you can introduce a food challenge for your body. Sometimes with intolerances they can be hard to identify. Your intolerance may be to no gluten at all or you may be able to tolerate a small amount. Your body can have a build up over a three day period. Take a challenge such as eating a few slices of bread and see what happens. Try over a few days. If you have a reaction then eliminate wheat/gluten again and try after another week to include it again. You will realise the 2nd time if you have reaction again that you have a food intolerance. It's just clearing your body of possible toxins and then testing by eating them again. Listen to your body.

    You have already noted that you feel better after a few days........that's a good indication.

    To start a gluten-free diet you really do need a positive attitude and be ready to accept the challenge. You already have this.

    2ndly then try to eat fruits, veges, salads (no dressings) rice, unflavoured dairy and fresh plain proteins such as meat, chicken, eggs and fish. This makes it easier to know you are eating gluten-free initially and then you can introduce foods that are labelled as gluten-free and experiment in cooking recipes using gluten-free flours.

    For snacks you can have fruits, dried fruits, nuts (not flavoured ones though), plain potato chips, freshly popped popcorn (best to pop your own from popping corn or buy unflavoured popcorn) , yogurt (check labelled as gluten-free), rice cookies and dips (check gluten-free), rice cakes with honey, jam/jellies, peanut butter.

    Might also be useful for you to check out our threads on gluten-free tips for cooking and gluten-free ingredients.

    ******
    I was reading your story and remembering how great it felt when I started seeing my allergy specialist and he listened to how I felt and knew exactly what I was going thru. Seeing him has truely changed my life.
    To think my mother was told when I was younger that I had growing pains and then I was told that I suffered from sinus, migraines and Irritable Bowel Syndrome. I've even suffered through sinus surgery (probably now realise that this could have been avoided).
    Some doctors dont realise that food intolerances can cause such issues and that simpley avoiding these foods can make such a dramatic difference.

    I hope that avoiding gluten/wheat will help you.
    We'd love to hear how you get on and please holler if you need any help. icon_biggrin.gif
    Barbara S
    Sat Apr 12, 2008 9:55 pm
    Regular "Line Cook" Poster
    I agree that diet can affect hair loss, esp. if you are allergic to any foods. I twitch and itch when I eat corn, have diareaha and my face breaks out ( at 59) when I ingest any form of milk or dairy, and I gain weight esp. in the form of cellulite when I eat any gluten.

    My nutritionist put me through several tests and one of them came up with an allergy to any phenol based chemicals or food. Phenol is in baking soda and other foods too and very hard to avoid. But most of all Phenol is found in so many of our personal care and cleaning products. We absorb so much through our skin. That includes creams, lotions, makeup, toothpaste, mouthwash, laundry detergent, fabric softener. She had me switch out my whole household to organic products and I really noticed a difference. It's even a proven fact that exposure to household cleaning chemicals can agravate fibromylagia.

    So when you are looking for a reason for hair loss, you need to remove anything else that might aggravate your problem, including chemicals. Change out all your food storage containers to glass, Don't use any plastic when you cook your food in the micro because of the plastic that transfers to your food when heated and eat raw fresh fruits and vegetables. Cook your foods in stainless steel not aluminum. Make sure you are getting enough essential fatty acids. Be careful to only take pharmecuetical grade fish oil.

    Let me know if you want me to send you links to the ones that I take.

    Good luck in this as I also am unable to eat anything with Gluten.

    Barb
    kwlabear
    Sun Apr 13, 2008 2:29 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I have always been overweight, and I've got about 70 pounds to lose. I did a gluten free diet until my doctor told me I didn't have celiac disease and could put the gluten back in my diet. Big mistake! I gained about 30 pounds after quitting gluten free foods. I'm back on it now, and I'm starting to feel better. Going gluten free/dairy free can help with chronic pain too. I checked a book out of the library, The Gluten Connection by Shari Lieberman. It was very interesting. I found out that if you have problems with wheat/gluten, it can cause hypothyroidism, which would be why you're losing hair. This book has recipes in it and several of them came from recipezaar.
    Chef #807468
    Sun Apr 13, 2008 6:43 pm
    Regular "Line Cook" Poster
    thanks guys,
    that's very interesting, my mom had thyroid issues, hyperthyriod though.
    my brother was lactose intolerant as a baby.
    it wouldn't surprize me to find out it runs in our family.
    I've also been told that my symptoms reflect hypothyriodism, however, my blood tests have always come back normal.
    ....but still i wonder...

    I've been wary of the microwave since it first was invented! something about it always seemed odd to me even as a youngster.. and i've also read that the plastics that get in our food mimic hormones and really mess up some peoples systems. I have some corning ware microwave bowls and 3 pyrex visionware stovetop cooking pots---discontinued, i had to get them off ebay. That really makes me feel good, sometimes i feel like a half lunatic for being so repulsed by chemicals around us everyday.
    I bought lavender dryer packs at trader joes to scent my laundry, which is the only reason i ever used fabric softner in the first place...but i've heard so many bad things about it i've been wanting to quit.
    i have some flax oils and evening primrose oil caps for efa's.
    i actually think i notice a difference when i take them.

    i've been overweight since i was about 8 or 9 years old. it's not like i ever started eating more or getting sedentary...i just started to put on pounds and have been that way since.

    haven't seen a drop in weight yet, but i feel really different.
    i don't get hungry as often...?
    it will be interesting to see...i'm contemplating giving up wheat for 6 months to a year, and see what i'm like then.
    Chef #807468
    Sun Apr 13, 2008 6:45 pm
    Regular "Line Cook" Poster
    thanks guys,
    that's very interesting, my mom had thyroid issues, hyperthyriod though.
    my brother was lactose intolerant as a baby.
    it wouldn't surprize me to find out it runs in our family.
    I've also been told that my symptoms reflect hypothyriodism, however, my blood tests have always come back normal.
    ....but still i wonder...

    I've been wary of the microwave since it first was invented! something about it always seemed odd to me even as a youngster.. and i've also read that the plastics that get in our food mimic hormones and really mess up some peoples systems. I have some corning ware microwave bowls and 3 pyrex visionware stovetop cooking pots---discontinued, i had to get them off ebay. That really makes me feel good, sometimes i feel like a half lunatic for being so repulsed by chemicals around us everyday.
    I bought lavender dryer packs at trader joes to scent my laundry, which is the only reason i ever used fabric softner in the first place...but i've heard so many bad things about it i've been wanting to quit.
    i have some flax oils and evening primrose oil caps for efa's.
    i actually think i notice a difference when i take them.

    i've been overweight since i was about 8 or 9 years old. it's not like i ever started eating more or getting sedentary...i just started to put on pounds and have been that way since.

    haven't seen a drop in weight yet, but i feel really different.
    i don't get hungry as often...?
    it will be interesting to see...i'm contemplating giving up wheat for 6 months to a year, and see what i'm like then.
    internetnut
    Sun May 04, 2008 11:16 am
    Food.com Groupie
    SWalker wrote:
    As an added thought; my entire family started having trouble with thinning hair when we switched to Pantene, stopped when we threw it out.



    I to started to notice my hair thining after using pantene and I do not use after a hair stylist daugther told me that can cause hair loss. I still am having mild hair loss but I to have a mild allergy to wheat. After reading ths it makes me wonder if it's not related to hair loss. But I also have alot of the thyriod systems but all the test come back neg. But they keep testing because I do have a cyst on my thyriod. Thanks for posting this I think I'll check with my allergist and see what they say. Christine (internetnut)
    Chef# 616082
    Sun May 04, 2008 12:31 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    All tests have a range with normal being from, say.... 100 to 300.
    If you are a person that functions best at 300 and are currently having symptoms resulting in the tests being run and they come back at 125 Doctors will tell you that the results are normal. But you won't feel good again until you're closer to the levels you need to be at to function best.
    I learned this when I was researching hormone levels when I started having perimenapause symptoms.
    I take maca now and it's eliminated all the symptoms.
    I haven't bothered with testing, I just use how I feel as a guide.
    Wheat isn't all that good for anyone, and certaintly isn't necessary in any diet, just convenient.
    My daughter started having low thyroid symptoms after the birth of her son.
    A Doctor of Chinese medicine told her she was sensitive to; wheat, corn, millet and soy. The entire family went wheat free for a year until she was tested for celiac. When it came back negative we started eating wheat again. Within two months her big two was throbbing everyday and her two year old woke up at 4:00 in a full seizure.
    He's never had another seizure because we eliminated gluten and her toe is fine, if she doesn't cheat.
    The thing with her toe is kind of sickly funny. She can't complain about it anymore because if she does I'll know she cheated because it happens the next day, everytime.
    We are never going to eat gluten again. The broad range of symptoms are AMAZING. It's not worth it.
    We are lucky to be gluten free today instead of twenty years ago. They are 6 or 7 different yummy and nutritious flours we can cook and bake with and scads of additives to make our baking equal to our better than the insidious gluten.
    I'm sorry about the book.
    Barbara S
    Sun May 04, 2008 2:09 pm
    Regular "Line Cook" Poster
    Where did you do your research on the anemia caused by gluten blocking iron absorption? I'd like to give it to my 21 yr old son to read. He was put on iron supplements because of blood test results when he was in high school. But now he is experiencing the same tiredness and I'm afraid he too is gluten intolerant. Hard to tell a kid he can't have the foods he loves unless I can back it up with data. I was so hoping he had inherited his fathers immune system, but as time goes on, it appears he has mine.

    Also out of curiosity, do you know what your blood type is? If you have ever heard about the "Eat for your type" book, you might want to check it out. It's not infallable, but the diet suggestions and the foods to avoid have been about 90% on for me after my allergy tests. And the foods that bothered me or I didn't like were on the list to avoid. So it kinda made sense. My nutritionist says it is a basic guide, but you really need to let your body be your deciding point. If your body doesn't respond well to a food, avoid it even if it's on the ok list.
    sunnygirl #2
    Fri Jun 27, 2008 5:17 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    I am new here so HI.
    My eldest sonsuffered from alopecia(hair loss0at 11 years, 16 years and again at 20 years.After seeing a homoeopath it was decided to use a glur\ten free diet. His hair growth returned quite quickly. He eats mostly gluten free now and seems fine. I don't think it is a true gluten intolerance, so perhaps just wheat. It's hard as he is 21 and "knows best".
    All 6 of my children were born with thick, dark, long hair except for my 5th child, also a boy. He still had more hair than lots of babies but it was lighter and finer. To cut a long story short, he is a coeliac.
    My middle son has the thickest, curliest hair I have ever seen(move over the Jackson 5). No coeliac or hair loss but lots of food and environmental allergies.
    Now this is strange, but my three daughters have no allergies/intolerances. Something to do with the genes perhaps.
    **Jubes**
    Fri Jun 27, 2008 6:40 am
    Forum Host
    sunnygirl #2 wrote:
    I am new here so HI.
    My eldest sonsuffered from alopecia(hair loss0at 11 years, 16 years and again at 20 years.After seeing a homoeopath it was decided to use a glur\ten free diet. His hair growth returned quite quickly. He eats mostly gluten free now and seems fine. I don't think it is a true gluten intolerance, so perhaps just wheat. It's hard as he is 21 and "knows best".
    All 6 of my children were born with thick, dark, long hair except for my 5th child, also a boy. He still had more hair than lots of babies but it was lighter and finer. To cut a long story short, he is a coeliac.
    My middle son has the thickest, curliest hair I have ever seen(move over the Jackson 5). No coeliac or hair loss but lots of food and environmental allergies.
    Now this is strange, but my three daughters have no allergies/intolerances. Something to do with the genes perhaps.


    Hi sunnygirl#2 wave.gif

    We have both Coeliacs (Aussie spelling icon_lol.gif ) and gluten intolerance in my family too.

    It's interesting that only your sons have all the problems.

    Julie
    Chef# 616082
    Fri Jun 27, 2008 12:49 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    The ratio of boys to girls with late onset autism that they are curing with a gluten free diet is very lopsided as well. So it would seem that gluten intolerance effects boys sooner and worse.
    Kristi Waterworth
    Fri Jun 27, 2008 1:40 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Heya, kathyb!

    Sorry to hear about the hair. I lost a big chunk when I was 19 that has yet to grow back (9 years later). I am fairly sure I was a Celiac then, but I also have thyroid issues (which can cause that, too). If your eyebrows start falling out, make sure to have a thyroid test! icon_smile.gif

    ~Kristi
    Chef #807468
    Fri Jun 27, 2008 9:39 pm
    Regular "Line Cook" Poster
    hey,
    thanks for the posts.
    although my thyroid falls within the normal range, i was recently seen by a naturopath who said that with the symptoms i have, that my T3 could stand to be a little higher.
    so i'm trying a natural remedy(coconut oil) for that first to see if it helps.

    I tried to do the SCD and felt really good while i was doing it, but it is hard to stick with when special/social events come up. I also noticed less hair shedding, and conversely, increased shedding when i revert to eating fast food/junk food/ starchy food.

    so i may be on to something.
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