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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Gardening, Herbs, Spices and More / cucuzza squash
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    cucuzza squash

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    Kim D.
    Tue Feb 05, 2008 9:02 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    ~~~~~~~~~EDITED 4/27/09~~~~~~~~~~
    This post was originally for free cucuzza seeds, but it was posted last year and I'm out of seeds. I'm really sorry! icon_sad.gif My cucuzza was damaged by Hurricane Ike last summer, so I didn't get to save any new seeds last fall. I had just a few seeds left in the refrigerator and I planted them this year. Hopefully, I'll have extra seeds to share for next year.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



    I have tons of cucuzza seeds which I dried last year if anyone is interested. I always plant the seeds in March... so it's almost time! icon_razz.gif

    A cucuzza is a long green Italian squash. My aunt used to grow them in her back yard when I was a kid. She would slice them, dip them in egg, then bread crumbs and fry them up in olive oil. For years I searched for a plant or seeds with no luck. Then several years ago, my mother found some seeds. I've been growing them every year since. They have a mild nutty flavor and can be used in any recipe calling for zucchini.

    However, I must warn you, they take lots of sun and they need a large trellis to grow on because the plant can grow 2 feet per day and the squash can grow 10 inches per day! icon_eek.gif icon_biggrin.gif





    If you're interested, just z-mail me and give me your address. If you don't have premium membership, you can post here that you want some and I will z-mail you.


    Last edited by Kim D. on Mon Apr 27, 2009 3:06 pm, edited 1 time in total
    Kim127
    Tue Feb 05, 2008 9:07 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    icon_eek.gif That's a big a#$ squash plant. I do believe I'm scared.
    Kim D.
    Tue Feb 05, 2008 9:11 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Kim127 wrote:
    icon_eek.gif That's a big a#$ squash plant. I do believe I'm scared.


    icon_lol.gif It can be scary! Last year we had so much rain within about 10 days that I couldn't go out to train the vine onto the trellis. The vine ended up in our oak tree and wouldn't you know that most of the cucuzzas grew up in the tree! You should have seen my DH out there trying to cut them down. He had to cut at least 6 cucuzzas from out of the tree and I was standing under them trying to catch them as they fell. icon_lol.gif
    3KillerBs
    Wed Feb 06, 2008 8:39 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I would dearly love to, but I don't dare. I'm already planning on growing 7 kinds of squash (combined winter and summer), plus 5 kinds of melons. There is simply no more room for vines anywhere!

    They look really COOL though.
    Paka
    Thu Feb 07, 2008 6:47 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Kim,
    I would love some of the seeds. I don't have a PM. I'll reimburse you for the postage. I'm tired of the zucchini and yellow squash, been growing them for years. Would love to try something new.
    Kim D.
    Sat Feb 09, 2008 10:13 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Paka wrote:
    Kim,
    I would love some of the seeds. I don't have a PM. I'll reimburse you for the postage. I'm tired of the zucchini and yellow squash, been growing them for years. Would love to try something new.


    Hi Paka, you have a z-mail. icon_smile.gif
    Chef #761068
    Mon Feb 11, 2008 10:27 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Hi there we're a big Italian family in Missouri and I would love to have some of those Cucuzza seeds to grow this year. Also my mom say's she has a recipe for the way my Grandma used to fix it, if you would be interested in it . Thank you so much
    aprons
    Sat Feb 16, 2008 8:37 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    Hi Kim, I would love to have 5 or 6 seeds if you have any left. I don't have premium though, maybe someday. Thanks, Lyn
    Kiersten Phae
    Sun Feb 24, 2008 8:44 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Kim,
    I love those squash! They are known as Opo Squash or "Bau" in Vietnamese. I love to make soup out of them. My daughter thinks they taste like a cucumber mixed w/ a mild onion flavor.

    Can you give me any general types about how you grow them? I know they are cold tolerant, but do they require a lot of sun, water, etc? The area I was thinking about planting them does not get a full day's sun.

    Any tips would be appreciated!
    Chef1MOM~Connie
    Sun Feb 24, 2008 9:18 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Kim- I would love to give these a shot. They look fabulous and SH and I are really into veggies.
    I will reimburse postage or send a SSAE to you for seeds.
    I to am interested in how they grow, water, dirt, shade or sun, etc.

    Connie
    Kim D.
    Mon Feb 25, 2008 9:10 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    [quote="Chef #761068"]Hi there we're a big Italian family in Missouri and I would love to have some of those Cucuzza seeds to grow this year. Also my mom say's she has a recipe for the way my Grandma used to fix it, if you would be interested in it . Thank you so much[/quote]

    I just sent you a z-mail. I would love your Grandma's recipe. I think you should post it here on Recipezaar so everyone can enjoy it! icon_smile.gif
    Kim D.
    Mon Feb 25, 2008 9:13 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    aprons wrote:
    Hi Kim, I would love to have 5 or 6 seeds if you have any left. I don't have premium though, maybe someday. Thanks, Lyn


    Just sent you a z-mail. icon_smile.gif
    Kim D.
    Mon Feb 25, 2008 9:13 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Kiersten Phae wrote:
    Kim,
    I love those squash! They are known as Opo Squash or "Bau" in Vietnamese. I love to make soup out of them. My daughter thinks they taste like a cucumber mixed w/ a mild onion flavor.

    Can you give me any general types about how you grow them? I know they are cold tolerant, but do they require a lot of sun, water, etc? The area I was thinking about planting them does not get a full day's sun.

    Any tips would be appreciated!


    I just sent you a z-mail. icon_smile.gif
    Kim D.
    Mon Feb 25, 2008 9:23 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Planting Tips and Directions:

    I start my seeds March 19th (St. Joseph's Day) and I'm in Texas (zone 9a). They need a large trellis to grow on, lots of sun, and not much water. I'm not sure about the type of soil prefered, but perhaps an experienced gardener can help make a suggestion. I'm sure it would be similar to other varieties of squash.

    I start the seeds off by planting them in small, deep pots filled with a seed germinating mix. It's important to have deep pots, because the roots get long really fast. Water and cover with plastic wrap and keep them inside in a warm window. Once they start to sprout, I remove the plastic wrap. Keep moist, but not too wet. Once the plant is a few inches tall, I sit the pots outside in a partly sunny spot to harden. After about a week or two, I replant them in the ground next to a tall trellis. They love the sun and they don't take much water. Also, I plant African Blue basil near the cucuzza because you will need bees to pollinate the blooms. If you don't have bees, you can cross-pollinate them yourself with a small paint brush. The male bloom is just a skinny stem with a bloom at the end and the female bloom looks like a small squash with a bloom at the end.

    That sounds like a lot of info, but they really are simple to grow. They tend to start off growing kind of slow, but once they start to bloom the plant will really take off.
    Paka
    Tue Feb 26, 2008 11:56 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Kim,
    Received the seeds. Thank you so much. I love growing things with a history or story. Now all I have to do is wait, at this point, impatiently, for this darn snow to go away! I did start one seed, just needed to see something grow! Thanks again. Suzanne
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