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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Middle East & North Africa / Palestinian dessert??!?!!
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    Palestinian dessert??!?!!

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    Bella26
    Wed Nov 14, 2007 12:56 pm
    Regular "Line Cook" Poster
    Hi there,

    A palestinian lady gave my husband some dessert and I need to know what the name of it is so that i can make it as well, perhaps for thanksgiving.

    They are big folded phyllo dough triangles with some sort of white cream/maybe rice pudding in between the folding, and then they are sprinkled with ground pistachios on their top center. And you're supposed to put sheera on top b4 eating it.

    Please, the name of it ASAP is really much appreciated and a tried/tested recipe of this would be wonderful!

    thanks
    Elmotoo
    Thu Nov 15, 2007 7:08 pm
    Forum Host
    Hi!

    I think it is Kanafeh . There isn't a recipe for it on Zaar. (yet) I'm looking for a TNT online & will brb.

    Beth
    Elmotoo
    Thu Nov 15, 2007 7:13 pm
    Forum Host
    This is from a Lebanese site:

    Kanafeh


    2 Packages Shredded Phyllo Dough
    Kanafeh Food Coloring
    1 Stick of unsalted butter, melted
    2 packages of Nabulsi sweet cheese, sliced into 1/4" thick slices
    Raw pistachios

    Large Pan


    Sugar Syrup without any rose or orange water, just plain syrup(if you need the recipe let me know)

    1. After the dough is thawed, mix in some of the melted butter and mix. You may not need all of it, we just need to coat the dough and get it separated. Mix in the Kanafeh coloring (its powder), use as much as you like until you get the shade of orange you like. I have never used regular food coloring for this so I don't know the results.

    2. In the large pan, spread out about half the phyllo and pat it down. Make sure the bottom is fully covered.

    3. Lay the slices of cheese side by side on top of the dough.

    4. Cover the cheese with the remaining phyllo dough. Make sure all the cheese is covered well! Also make sure the corners are covered too. Pat it down for an even look.

    5. Bake it until the cheese melts and the top is a bit crunchy. Pour the cooled syrup on top. Don't put too much, some people don't like it dripping. You can always add extra syrup to individual pieces as they are being served.

    6 If you like you can garnish each piece with sound ground raw pistachios.

    HTH! Beth
    Bella26
    Fri Nov 16, 2007 11:40 am
    Regular "Line Cook" Poster
    thanks, I appreciate you trying to find it for me... I know what kunafa is, and this isn't kunafa. I've never even heard of kunafa with phyllo dough, as you're supposed to use something like vermicelli.

    I was able to get the name of the recipe but I only know how it sounds in arabic, and so i wouldn't know how to spell it icon_confused.gif
    It sounds like GOULESH/KOULESH/QULESH.....

    It's made with phyllo dough, and a white filling mixture that looks like milk with cornstarch, and they're folded into triangles, and they are eaten with sheera on top (arabic sugar syrup), and you decorate their centers with ground pistachios.

    If anybody knows what im talking about, pleaaaaaaaaaase tell me ASAP so i can practice it, and then serve it for thanksgiving!!!!
    Um Safia
    Fri Nov 16, 2007 1:54 pm
    Forum Host
    Bella26 wrote:
    thanks, I appreciate you trying to find it for me... I know what kunafa is, and this isn't kunafa. I've never even heard of kunafa with phyllo dough, as you're supposed to use something like vermicelli.

    I was able to get the name of the recipe but I only know how it sounds in arabic, and so i wouldn't know how to spell it icon_confused.gif
    It sounds like GOULESH/KOULESH/QULESH.....

    It's made with phyllo dough, and a white filling mixture that looks like milk with cornstarch, and they're folded into triangles, and they are eaten with sheera on top (arabic sugar syrup), and you decorate their centers with ground pistachios.

    If anybody knows what im talking about, pleaaaaaaaaaase tell me ASAP so i can practice it, and then serve it for thanksgiving!!!!


    Hi Bella26,

    I think I am familiar with what you are describing. The triangles are common throughout the entire middle east and each country gives them a different name.

    (''GOULESH/KOULESH/QULESH'' means 'everything' in many Arabic dialects.....)

    I can't find the exact recipe I want but here's a similar one...

    Take a look at this recipe to see if it's anything like you're looking for:

    Sabeye b'Lebeh – Cheese-Filled Pastries

    By Jennifer Felicia Abadi

    These are not difficult, but they are time-consuming; you have to methodically hand-fold each triangle out of a strip of phyllo dough. But once they are done, you can freeze and enjoy them at a later date. Because the rose water syrup should be ice-cold when served over Syrian pastries, it must be prepared five to six hours ahead of time or the night before to allow enough time to chill in the refrigerator. Rose water is available at Middle Eastern markets. Serves 15 to 20 (about 81 phyllo triangles)

    Sabeyeh b'Lebeh (Phyllo Triangles with Sweet Ricotta Filling)

    1 cup whole milk
    1/4 cup Cream of Rice cereal
    2 tablespoons sugar
    One 15-ounce container (about 2 cups) whole-milk ricotta cheese
    1-1/2 Tablespoons rose water
    1/2 lb. phyllo dough (half of a 1-pound box), thawed according to package directions
    6 Tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
    6 Tablespoons vegetable oil
    Ground cinnamon
    Cold rose-water syrup (see below)

    Bring the milk to a boil in a medium-size saucepan. Add the cereal and mix well with a spoon. Remove from the heat, add the sugar and stir for 30 seconds to dissolve. Cover and let stand for 3 minutes, allowing the cereal to thicken.

    Place the ricotta and rose water in a large bowl and combine well with the cereal mixture. Set aside.

    Unroll the phyllo dough on a countertop and gently smooth out with dry hands. With a kitchen scissors or very sharp knife, cut the phyllo in half widthwise – along the short end. Reroll one half and securely wrap in a plastic bag, plastic wrap, or aluminum foil (phyllo will keep up to 1 week in the refrigerator; do not refreeze).

    Cut the remaining half lengthwise into 3 equal strips 3 inches wide and about 12 inches long. Place the strips on top of each other to form one stack and cover with a damp towel to keep moist.

    Preheat the oven to 300 degrees for 15 minutes. Combine the butter and oil.

    Working with one strip of dough at a time, gently peel off a single layer of phyllo and place it vertically before you on a clean work surface. Re-cover the stack of phyllo with a damp towel. Using a pastry brush, coat the entire strip lightly with the butter-oil mixture.

    In the bottom left corner, about half an inch from the left and bottom, place 1 teaspoon of the ricotta filling. Fold the bottom right corner over the filling to the leftmost side to form your first triangle shape. Continue to fold the triangle onto itself until you reach the end, brushing with the butter-oil mixture if the phyllo appears dry and cracks while folding.
    Brush the surface and loose edge with the butter-oil mixture. (You may freeze the triangles at this point for up to 3 weeks by gently placing them in a large tin or tightly sealed plastic container in layers, separated by plastic wrap or wax paper. The frozen triangles can be placed directly in the oven.) Place the triangles on an ungreased baking sheet about 1 inch apart.

    Bake until slightly brown and crisp, 12-15 minutes (15-20 minutes for frozen triangles). Serve warm or at room temperature on a large platter, sprinkled with cinnamon and drizzled with syrup. These will keep, refrigerated, for up to 3 days. Reheat in the oven for 3 to 4 minutes before serving.

    Rose-Water Syrup

    3/4 cup cold water
    2 cups sugar
    1 Tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons rose water
    1 Tablespoon lemon juice

    Combine the water and sugar in a medium-size saucepan. Bring to a bubbling simmer over medium heat. Reduce the heat to medium-low and cook, uncovered, for 12 to 15 minutes, stirring occasionally (the liquid will thicken slightly). Remove from heat. Immediately stir in the rose water and lemon juice.

    Let cool slightly, then pour into a glass jar. Refrigerate for at least 5 hours or overnight until completely chilled. Serve very cold in a pitcher or drizzled over various desserts in this chapter. This syrup will remain fresh in a jar in the refrigerator for months.

    From Jennifer Felicia Abadi, A Fistful of Lentils: Syrian-Jewish Recipes from Grandma Fritzie's Kitchen (Boston: Harvard Common Press, 2002); used with permission.


    Obviously, you can then sprinkle the pistachios on the top at the end.

    I will keep looking for you and see if my friends know any recipes....

    Rezika.
    Bella26
    Fri Nov 16, 2007 3:27 pm
    Regular "Line Cook" Poster
    I have seen this recipe already, but i'm still unsure if that is the one... I would really really really appreciate it if you were able to find me the real recipe from your friends.. The lady had called it "kulash bil jibneh", but nowhere on the net can i find this..

    Also, my mother said they're called "sh'oubeeyat", but she's uncertain and doesn't know how to make it either.
    chef FIFI
    Fri Nov 16, 2007 5:37 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    ko'lage...thats the term for it...but unfortunately I have had a hard time locating a recipe for it...Ko'lage can be made with a creme filling referred to as ishta or kishta...or cheese(jibneh).
    They happen to be my most favorite arabic dessert. I craved for them during pregnancy.


    Last edited by chef FIFI on Fri Nov 16, 2007 10:07 pm, edited 1 time in total
    Elmotoo
    Fri Nov 16, 2007 7:03 pm
    Forum Host
    These don't have the names you've all mentioned so far but maybe something is close to something?

    Qatayef (Ramadan pancakes)
    This sweet is prepared only during the Muslim Holy month of Ramadan which will start around the 7th of December this year. You will find stands set up everywhere you go in Palestine with a hot plate where they pour the batter and in seconds you have round qatayef (pan- cakes) which are placed on top of each other and weighed according to the amount you want to buy. As soon as you reach home, you need to separate them and leave them to cool, otherwise they will stick to each other.

    Ingredients:
    Qatayef (Pancakes). Buy as many as you will need and no more, estimating a minimum of 2 per person.
    Stuffing option 1: White sweetened cheese (can be found in all supermarkets), pinch of cinnamon, sugar to taste.
    Stuffing option 2: walnuts, coconut, sugar to taste, pinch of cinnamon.
    Sugar water: 1 glass of water, 2 glasses of sugar, a few drops of lemon juice.
    For filling option # 1: cut the white cheese into very small pieces and shred them using your hands. Add the cinnamon and sugar and mix.
    For filling option # 2: smash the walnuts and add the coconut and cinnamon and sugar together. Place a small amount of either one of the fillings in the center of the Qatayef (pancake) and fold one side towards the other and stick them together by pressing on the sides. You now have a crescent shaped pancake. Fry or bake until golden brown on both sides. Dip into the sugar water and remove. Serve hot.
    Sugar water: To prepare, mix all the ingredients in a pan over the stove. Stir continuously until it boils. Continue to stir until the mixture thickens and the sugar is totally dissolved.
    Elmotoo
    Fri Nov 16, 2007 7:04 pm
    Forum Host
    Cream Pudding with Pistachios " 'Eish es-Saraya"
    Bread means 'eish. 'Eish es Saraya literally the bread of the palaces is an appellation laden with images of one thousand and one dreams and totally appropriate to this delectable dessert. This layered dessert can turn any dinner party into an unforgettable experience. Kishta is a double cream of thick consistency that can be bought from Middle-Eastern pastry shops or supermarkets. A good substitute is double cream or fresh cream.

    Ingredients

    ½ a loaf of sliced white bread (250 grams/9 oz.)
    grilled
    2 cups water
    1 ½ cups sugar
    1 tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice
    1 tsp rose water
    350 grams kishta
    1 cup milk
    1 ½ tbsps corn flour
    2 tbsps rose water
    80 grams shelled and chopped pistachios

    Chop the grilled bread in a food processor on low so as to get coarse but small chunks. Spread the crumbs at the bottom of a rectangular medium size serving plate -about 25 centimetres/10 inches- with a 6 cm/about 2 ½ inches edge. To prepare the syrup dissolve the sugar in the water and let it boil for a few minutes adding the lemon juice in the process. Add the rose water after you remove it from the heat. Pour it hot over the bread so as to soak it completely. With the back of a fork press the layer of sweetened bread against the bottom of the plate to obtain a more compact layer. In a small casserole mix thoroughly the kishta the milk and corn flour and bring to boil on medium heat stirring constantly with a wooden spoon. Cook over low heat for a few minutes or until the cream pudding is thick enough to cling to the back of the spoon. Remove from the heat and add the rose water. Spread the pudding over the bread mixture covering it completely. Sprinkle a thick layer of pistachios on top and let cool. Refrigerate for a few hours before serving. If you are using fresh cream add 3 tablespoons of corn flour to three cups of fresh cream and cook the same way as kishta adding the rose water last.
    Um Safia
    Tue Nov 20, 2007 11:45 am
    Forum Host
    Hi Bella,

    I haven't got you an exact recipe from my Palestinian friend but she was the one who gave me my recipe a long time ago. I say 'recipe' but like many recipes in the middle east, it's more a story of " I'll show you how to make it, so you can go home and make it for yourself" kind of thing.

    The recipe is pretty much the same but here in the UK I can't get the right cheese so I've always used ricotta or on occasion a very thick greek yogurt (which worked well). I also don't use sugar but sweeten the cheese with honey - just mix really well.

    I have never used the milk and cream of rice stuff, so I would say to use 4 cups of ricotta and sweeten to taste with honey.

    Oh and I always use melted ghee to brush the phyllo with as it gives a wonderful and very authentic taste.

    I always make my own phyllo, especially for recipes like this as you can control the size of the triangles you want better. This is up to you of course...........

    Finally take about 3/4 cup of finely chopped raw pistachios for the decoration.

    Other than that stick to the recipe icon_wink.gif

    Rezika.
    Chef #778530
    Fri Feb 29, 2008 11:15 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    The dessert that you are referring to is my all time favorite and it is called Warbat.

    "Warbat" are basically baked filo pastry triangles filled with fresh cooked cream "Ashtah", drizzled with sugar syrup "Atar" and sprinkled with ground pistachio.

    I live near a great bakery that makes them so I unfortunately don't have a good recipe for them, but I am sure now that you know the name you can track one down. The Nestle International website has a recipe there, but I haven't tried it yet.
    Good Luck!
    Chef #869605
    Sun Jun 22, 2008 6:53 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Hi, I am not sure if you are still looking for that dessert's name. It is called Warbat. Here is what I was able to find you.
    "Warbat" are basically baked filo pastry triangles filled with fresh cooked cream "Ashtah", drizzled with sugar syrup "Atar" and sprinkled with ground pistachio. These sweets mostly eaten in Ramadan and the home baked ones of course are much better than the store bought.
    This is a link to a picture.
    http://bp3.blogger.com/_AadKZ4zO8sI/RdXuUupWCmI/AAAAAAAAAAc/e7X1m-Cugoc/s1600-h/P1000889.JPG
    abu noor
    Thu Jul 10, 2008 1:00 am
    Regular "Line Cook" Poster
    سلام عليكم

    معذرة سأكتب بالعربية لضعف لغتي الانجليزية

    تدعى وربات

    Warbat
    أو شعيبات
    sh'oubeeyat
    وهي معروفة في بلاد الشام

    اليكم الطريقة وهي من اعدادي


    الشعيبيات

    المقادير :
    باكيت من عجينة الرقائق الجاهزة ( عجينة البقلاوة ، وهناك ماركة الكرامة مقطعة مربعات صغيرة )
    كمية من السمن أو الزبدة
    فستق حلبي مبروش
    شيرة

    الحشوة :
    نصف كوب سميد ناعم
    2 كوب ونصف الكوب من الحليب
    ثلاثة أرباع الكوب من السكر
    نصف كوب ماء ورد


    الطريقة :
    نضع السميد في وعاء على نار خفيفة ونبدأ بتحريكه حتى يسخن جيدا دون أن يتغير لونه . ثم نضيف الحليب بالتدريج مع الاستمرار بالتحريك .
    نضيف السكر إلى المزيج ونحرك حتى يغلي ويترك على نار هادئة مدة عسر دقائق .
    نضيف ماء الورد ونحرك ونرفع القدر من على النار ، ويجب أن تكون الحشوة جامدة .
    بعد أن نكون قد حضرنا الحشوة نأخذ أربعا من رقائق العجين وندهن ثلاثا منها بالسمن أو الزبدة ونضعها على بعض ونضع الرابعة بدون سمن .
    يأخذ مقدار ملعقة صغيرة من الحشوة وتوضع على حافة الرقائق وتلف زاوية الرقائق على الزاوية المقابلة لها لنصل على شكل مثلث ويضغط على الأطراف ، ويمكن لف الرقائق بشكل اسطوانة .

    ترص القطع في صينية الفرن بعد دهنا بالزبدة وتدخل الفرن الحار حتى تحمر .
    تخرج من الفرن وترش بالشيرة وتزين بالفستق الحلبي .




    الرجاء من الأخت المشرفة الترجمة

    كذلك عندي الكثير من الوصفات إذا في حد يقدر على مساعدتي في الترجمة ..

    تحياتي

    أبو نور
    Elmotoo
    Fri Sep 12, 2008 6:02 pm
    Forum Host
    Oh my. Lovely photo!
    Chef #1351079
    Thu Aug 13, 2009 2:51 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    The name of the dessert you are talking about is Shaibiat. I do not know if this is the right spelling, but that is the one. It is not rice pudding, it is a custard.
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