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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Breads & Baking / Help with recipe #196201
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    Help with recipe #196201

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    jneen
    Sat Mar 06, 2010 3:05 pm
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    I am brand new to baking bread. I started this Zurie's Overnight No-Knead Bread last night at 10:00 p.m. I just uncovered it to start the second rise and it's still very, very liquidy. I used the four cups of flour recipe and followed it to a "t". I couldn't find any "instant" yeast so I used rapid rise.

    Is the yeast the problem??? Is my bread no good? It did have the little bubbles on top as mentioned in the recipe but I wouldn't consider it to be dough at this point. It's more like batter.

    Any help you can give me is appreciated. We are having company for dinner and I so wanted to make this bread for them. I do have a back up loaf of bakery bread, though. lol
    duonyte
    Sat Mar 06, 2010 3:17 pm
    Forum Host
    Gosh, that sounds wrong. It should be a s0ft dough, but not like a batter, which is what it sounds like. I have heard some mixed things about the rapid rise yeast, and have not used it myself - I don't know it it's the problem.

    The folding dough technique strengthens the gluten strands but I don't know whether you are able to fold anything. I am wondering whether you might not be better off treating this like a batter bread - scrape into a very well greased loaf pan or casserole dish, let rise and bake - in 375 deg oven, not in the high heat for this recipe.

    You'll have to judge for yourself how soft the dough is at this point. I would bake it, one way or the other, since you've gone this far.
    jneen
    Sat Mar 06, 2010 3:21 pm
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    That may well be what I end up doing. I'm sooo disappointed, though. I wanted to stretch myself and not be so afraid of yeast. Ah well, I'll try again with another recipe. Not today, though.
    _
    Sat Mar 06, 2010 4:31 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    jneen wrote:
    I am brand new to baking bread. I started this Zurie's Overnight No-Knead Bread last night at 10:00 p.m. I just uncovered it to start the second rise and it's still very, very liquidy. I used the four cups of flour recipe and followed it to a "t". I couldn't find any "instant" yeast so I used rapid rise.

    Is the yeast the problem??? Is my bread no good? It did have the little bubbles on top as mentioned in the recipe but I wouldn't consider it to be dough at this point. It's more like batter.

    Any help you can give me is appreciated. We are having company for dinner and I so wanted to make this bread for them. I do have a back up loaf of bakery bread, though. lol


    Well, with those proportions of flour and water it is going to be a very loose dough. The difference between a dough and a batter is a batter has to be thin enough for you to pour off individual portions. If you can't pour it off into individual portions then I would say you're fine.
    duonyte
    Sat Mar 06, 2010 4:41 pm
    Forum Host
    Yes, if you can manipulate the dough as instructed in the recipe, I'd forge ahead with it- have you seen any of the youtube examples of this? It might be easier to figure out whether you are on track if you actually saw it.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=13Ah9ES2yTU
    jneen
    Sat Mar 06, 2010 5:48 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Thanks for the utube link. That really did help. Mine certainly was never that firm. I could have poured it into muffin tins....I probably should have. I put it in two loaf pans and baked it at 375. I did add more yeast several minutes before I baked it, hoping that it would firm up. It didn't. We'll see. My company is here. I'll try to check back in after they leave or tomorrow.

    Thanks again to both of you. Here's hoping!
    duonyte
    Sat Mar 06, 2010 6:29 pm
    Forum Host
    I have made that recipe and it worked really well for me. Unfortunately adding yeast just before baking won't help out. We will have to work through this and try to figure out just what happened.
    jneen
    Sat Mar 06, 2010 9:59 pm
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    Well, it had a good taste but it was pretty heavy and not real wet but a little too wet. I ended up baking it for about an hour and I think it was just too wet to bake up properly.

    I have a measuring cup that has ml marked on it and I used 600, just as the recipe stated for 4 cups of flour.

    The yeast was not rapid rise it was "active dry". I didn't see any that said instant yeast. Should I buy the kind that's marked for bread machines? Think that would work better?

    The YouTube video was good. Mine did look like his when he mixed the water in but from what he was saying, I had a lot more water. I want to try again. I'm going to write down what he said on the video and try that.
    _
    Sun Mar 07, 2010 12:02 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Assuming the original recipe is correct according to my calculations for 4 cups of flour you should use 553 ml of water, not 600. That's a difference of over 3 tablespoons. That would make the dough a lot wetter than it should be.

    Original recipe as posted:
    3 cups flour
    415 ml. water

    If you use 4 cups of flour you're increasing the amount of flour by 1/3. So you would increase the water by 1/3 too. Increasing the water by 1/3 gives you 553ml.


    Last edited by _ on Mon Mar 08, 2010 3:13 am, edited 1 time in total
    jneen
    Sun Mar 07, 2010 10:00 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Well I'm not giving up easily. I intend to make it again. I'll probably buy different yeast, though.
    I tried toasting some this morning it was not good.

    Hmm, I wonder how Zurie said she increased the flour to 4 cups and used 600 ml of water if that's not correct. Would her measuring cups be different than mine? I used regular dry measure cups for the flour.

    From the reviews I assumed I had done something totally wrong. I don't want to leave a negative review if it was me and not the recipe. I'll not leave one at all at this point because I'm such a novice at bread.
    duonyte
    Sun Mar 07, 2010 10:04 pm
    Forum Host
    You would use dry measure cups with the flour and the metric measurements for the water. I am going to work out the math again myself in the morning to see if it's right. Don't give up, we will have you baking!
    jneen
    Sun Mar 07, 2010 10:07 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Thanks.
    Zurie
    Mon Mar 08, 2010 12:59 am
    Forum Host
    Sorry I came to this thread so late, alerted by duonyte.

    First of all (I did not read the recipe before coming here) I had my own problems when I wanted to increase the flour to 4 cups ... with the water.

    I am very bad at maths, and the water content was at first a major problem for me too.

    The chef with a -- as a name is probably correct, and the water should be 553 ml. Do try the lesser amount if you make it again.

    The last few times I made the bread I used the 3-cup recipe, because it's just husband and me, so the smaller bread is fine for us.

    The other unknown factor is the yeast. I'm in South Africa, and the dried yeast I use is called "Instant Yeast". I'm not sure whether that is the same as your "Rapid Rise Yeast", but it would seem so.

    Your bread "batter", as duonyte said, should be very soft, quite impossible to handle, but not as thin as you describe. So hard to explain!! After the first 18 hour rise you should be able to scrape it away from the sides of the bowl lightly, and let it "implode" on itself. Then pat it flatter, and let rise again for 2 hours.

    Unfortunately flours also differ. I use what is called "white bread flour", not as white as our cake flour, sort of creamy, and with a stronger gluten content.

    But mainly, I think, the water is too much. I'll check what the recipe says but I do remember having problems to calculate that exactly. So that's probably my fault.

    Maybe I should edit the recipe for the water content ...

    If you want perfect results try the 3 cup recipe first.
    jneen
    Mon Mar 08, 2010 10:15 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I will try the 3 cup version but I think I'll buy some bread machine yeast first as one of the reviewers said she used bread machine yeast. I used regular flour that was called "Better for Bread" by Gold Medal which is a very good flour.
    duonyte
    Mon Mar 08, 2010 11:01 am
    Forum Host
    "Better for Bread" is a bread flour, it has a higher gluten level than does all-purpose.
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