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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Breads & Baking / Ice Cream Bread
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    Ice Cream Bread

    Chef #580108
    Mon Sep 24, 2007 12:05 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Made Chef Chino's Cinnamon Raisin Ice Cream Bread yesterday. My first experience with ice cream bread, in fact, I had never even heard of it before I found this recipe.

    Anyway, my question is this. The bread came out kind of flat, didn't rise much during baking. And therefore is kind of dense. Is this normal for all ice cream breads???

    Thanks in advance for your answers/advice.

    Rick
    duonyte
    Tue Sep 25, 2007 7:15 am
    Forum Host
    I've never made one of these breads. It's a quick bread, so it depends on the baking powder that is in the self-rising flour to leaven the bread. Is it possible that your self-rising flour has been open for a while? Baking powder does not have a terribly long shelf life and I understand the same is true for self-rising flour.

    T9 me this would be the most likely explanation for getting a dense loaf.
    realbirdlady
    Tue Sep 25, 2007 10:21 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I'm wondering if it has to do with the ice cream. That's an awfully vague term for a bread recipe ingredient.

    Some premium brands have quite a bit of egg and cream; some cheapo brands have hardly any at all, and use other ingredients entirely to get the texture. Eggs and dairy would bake up in your bread just like you added them directly; an artificial stabilizer would do who knows what (but probably not stabilize the structure of a baked good).
    Chef 509022
    Tue Sep 25, 2007 11:20 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I saw this question and my first thought was why. Why would you want to take perfectly good ice cream and turn it into bread? It's not as if the ice cream contains some exotic ingredient that can't be obtained anywhere else.
    Chef #580108
    Wed Sep 26, 2007 10:57 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Because!
    duonyte
    Wed Sep 26, 2007 8:26 pm
    Forum Host
    Chef 509022 wrote:
    I saw this question and my first thought was why. Why would you want to take perfectly good ice cream and turn it into bread? It's not as if the ice cream contains some exotic ingredient that can't be obtained anywhere else.


    I suspect someone needed to make a cake, had no milk and decided to use ice cream as a substitute. I myself prefer my ice cream straight - but I also feel the same way about figs, avocados, champagne, .....
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