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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Slow Cooker & Crock-Pot Cooking / 10 hour slow cooker recipes
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    10 hour slow cooker recipes

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    Clover0
    Wed Jan 25, 2012 4:19 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Hi I have a slow cooker which I love but I can't use it when I work. I a, out of the house for 10-11 hours, closer to 11. Yet all the recipes I find are 7-8 or 8-10 hours...are there any recipes that I can leave in for 11 or more hours?

    Thanks
    duonyte
    Wed Jan 25, 2012 7:06 pm
    Forum Host
    Truthfully, not a whole lot. Even the ones that say they should be in the crockpot that long generally don't work that well. These are mostly older recipes, from when slow cookers ran cooler.

    I have one recipe posted that does take that long, it is a modern recipe, from a recent cookbook, Rajmah (Punjabi Curried Red Kidney Bean) (Slow-Cooker)

    This would be a good thing to collect - recipes that cook for more than 10 hours.

    Depending on the recipe, you can extend out the time by putting the slow cooker on a timer, which has it start cooking a couple of hours later. Of course, this depends on the ingredients you are using.
    duonyte
    Wed Jan 25, 2012 7:14 pm
    Forum Host
    This one might work, especially if you do the prep the night before and put everything into the crock while cold, Slow Cooker Italian Style Pot Roast

    One thing to remember is that if you use a big crockpot and you are not filling it 1/2 to 2/3 full, everything will cook faster. You are better off filling it up 3/4 full if you want to extend the cooking time a bit. So a smaller crockpot might work better.
    duonyte
    Wed Jan 25, 2012 8:28 pm
    Forum Host
    Red Apple Guy
    Thu Jan 26, 2012 3:18 pm
    Forum Host
    Sorry I joined this late, but one idea would be cooking a Boston Butt shoulder roastn which is a very forgiving roast to smoke or cook in a crock pot. Below are two recipes, one is duonyte's (the highest rated pulled pork reicpe on the site) and calls for cooking for 18.5 hours. Pulled Pork (Crock Pot)

    The next is mine (Crock-Pot Boston Butt Shoulder for Pulled Pork) and is a 6-10 hour cook depending on how hot your pot cooks, but I'll bet 11 hours would work with both recipes.

    Red
    Clover0
    Thu Jan 26, 2012 4:10 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Thank you both so much...if anyone else has any ideas please let me know! I think I will start a cookbook...
    duonyte
    Wed Feb 22, 2012 12:17 pm
    Forum Host
    I ran across this soup recipe, need to try it myself, Romanian Bean Soup

    and another one, Beef-Barley Soup


    I hope you do start a cookbook and make it public, it would be very helpful.
    jjhs
    Sat Jan 26, 2013 11:50 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    I have found that if I put my pork or beef roast in the crock pot frozen, it will take 10 hours to cook. I am also gone 10 hours a day, so I always put roast in from a frozen state.
    duonyte
    Sat Jan 26, 2013 3:20 pm
    Forum Host
    jjhs wrote:
    I have found that if I put my pork or beef roast in the crock pot frozen, it will take 10 hours to cook. I am also gone 10 hours a day, so I always put roast in from a frozen state.


    I know a lot of people do that. There is a bit of concern that the meat might stay at a danger zone level for bacterial growth. I've done it with things like meatballs and individual chicken pieces but have hesitated doing so with whole roasts - I think I may have done a small lamb roast once.

    There is less danger of bacteria with large pieces of meat than with ground meats, of course.
    duonyte
    Sat Jan 26, 2013 3:21 pm
    Forum Host
    Here is one I posted that I have not tried yet Short Ribs over Cheesy Polenta (Slow Cooker)
    jjhs
    Sat Jan 26, 2013 4:11 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    I have done this for years (from a frozen state) and we have never gotten sick. We only do this with large (4-5lb) roasts.
    Red Apple Guy
    Sat Jan 26, 2013 8:44 pm
    Forum Host
    Welcome to the forum Clover0 and jjhs. Visit often.
    Red
    Amberngriffinco
    Sun Aug 04, 2013 10:56 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    pork roast to shred for carnitas or bbq pork.

    I usually put it in before bed, around 9pm and, well, I guess I do put it in that long, b/c I don't get up till around 8-9am..
    Amberngriffinco
    Sun Aug 04, 2013 10:58 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    jjhs wrote:
    I have done this for years (from a frozen state) and we have never gotten sick. We only do this with large (4-5lb) roasts.



    me three, for many, many years. Never got sick yes, it goes from a solid freeze to fully cooked.
    Chef1MOM~Connie
    Sat Jan 18, 2014 1:25 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Clover the best advice I ever got for those long dys away was to use a timer. I purchased one for less than 5 dollars at the hardware store and set it to start the crock for 3-4 hours after I leave and set it to low. Works every time. My DD has the programmable crock but I do not so use this method. I use my crock on doctor days when I could be gone 10-12 hours, this way dinner is almost done when I get home. It leaves me enough time to unwind a bit, check dinner, set the table and make sides if needed.

    I also cook from the frozen state for roasts but not really for chicken. I do ribs, pork, beef, and reheating soups and sauces.

    You may want to pre-cook to half done some dinners ahead of time and then freeze so they fit into your crock, then it is really a warm up on low or warm setting.
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