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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Spain & Portugal / Portuguese / English Food Dictionary
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    Portuguese / English Food Dictionary

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    kiwidutch
    Fri May 25, 2007 2:39 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Here you will find a list of English / Portuguese cooking terms... DH who speaks some portuguese had this in a lovely neat table for us.. sadly it doesn't seem to import into Zaar.. so it's a work in progress and I am adding to it and tidying up as I can manage icon_smile.gif

    Apple - Maçã
    apple juice - sumo de maçã m
    apricot - damasco m
    apricot - alperce m


    baby pork - leitão m
    banana - banana m
    barbecued - churrasco m
    barbecued chicken - frango no churrasco
    beans - feijão
    beef - vaca
    beer - cerveja
    bill - conta
    black sea bream - chaputa
    boiled - cozido
    boiled casserole of meats and beans with rice and vegetables - cozido à portuguesa

    bottle - garrafa
    brazil nuts - castanha do pará
    brazilian sugar cane - Cachaça
    bread - pão
    bread soup - açorda
    bread soup with seafood - licquor açorda de marisco
    breakfast - pequeno almoço
    broad bean - fava
    brocolli - bróculos
    butter - manteiga


    cabbage - couve
    cabbage soup - caldo verde
    Cachaca - a Brazilian alcoholic beverage extracted from sugar cane.
    café - coffee
    cake - bolo
    candy - doce
    carrot - cenoura
    cauliflower - couve-flor
    cereal - cereais
    charcoaled - brasa
    cheese - queijo
    cherries - Cerejas
    chicken - frango
    chicken breast - peito de frango
    chicken soup with pasta - canja (de galinha)
    chilled vegetable soup - Gaspacho
    chilli sauce - piri-piri
    chips / french fries - batatas fritas
    chocolate - chocolate
    chocolate mousse - mousse de chocolate
    cider - Cidra
    clams - ameijoas
    cockles - berbigões
    cod / codfish - Bacalhau
    codfish - baked with white sauce olives and purée - bacalhau à Zé do Pipo

    cookie - Biscoito
    coriander - coentros
    corn - milho
    crab - Sapateira
    crab - caranguejo

    cream - natas
    - cream - whipping cream - nata para bater
    - cream - cooking cream - nata para culinaria
    croissant - Croissant
    cucumber - pepino
    cured ham - presunto
    cuttlefish - Chocos


    dessert - sobremesa
    dinner - jantar
    dish of the day - prato do dia
    drink - bebida
    dry wine - vinho seco
    duck - pato


    eel stew - ensopada de enguías
    eels - Enguias
    eggplant - berinjela
    egg - ovos
    expresso - Bica


    fig - figo
    fish - peixe
    fish soup - sopa de peixe
    fish stew - Caldeirada
    flour - Farinha
    food - alimentos
    fork - garfo
    fried - Estrelado
    fried - frito
    fruit -Fruta


    garlic - alho
    glass - copo
    goat - cabrito
    gold bream - Dourada
    grape - uva
    grapefruit - Toranja
    green beans - feijões-verdes
    grilled sardines -s ardinhas na brasa
    grilled sole - linguado grelhado
    grilled -grelhado
    Guarana - Brazilian beverage (contains 2.5 times stronger than the caffeine found in coffee, tea and soft drinks.)




    hake -Pescada
    ham -fiambre
    herring -Arenque
    hot chocolate -chocolate quente
    home-made -Caseiro
    hot dog cachorro-quente
    house steak -bife à casa


    ice cream -Gelado

    jam -compota
    juice -sumo


    knife -faca

    lamb chop -costeleta de borrego
    lamb chop -costeleta de carneiro
    lamb stew -ensopada de borrego
    lamb -Borrego
    leek -alho-porro
    lemon -limão
    lemonade -limonada
    lemons -Limões
    lettuce -alface
    liver -iscas
    lobster -Lagosta
    lunch -almoço


    mackerel -carapau
    mackerel -Cavala
    meat -carne
    medium steak - médio
    melon - Melão
    menu - ementa
    milk-shake - batido
    milk - Leite
    - milk - full fat - leite gordo
    - millk - half fat / semi skimmed - leite meio gordo
    - milk - skimmed - leite magro
    mineral water -água mineral
    mixed kebab -espetada mista
    monkfish kebab- espetada de tamboril
    mushroom -Cogumelo
    mussels -mexilhões
    mustard -Mostarda


    octopus -polvo
    olives -Azeitonas
    omelette -omelete
    onion -Cebola
    orange juice -sumo de laranja
    orange- laranja
    oven-baked -no forno
    oysters -ostras


    pancake -Panqueca
    parsley- salsa
    pasta -Massa
    paté -pate
    peach -Pêssego
    pear -pêra
    peas -Ervilhas
    pepper -pimenta
    pineapple juice -sumo de ananás
    pineapple -Ananás
    pizza -pizza
    plaice -Solha
    pork chop -costeleta de porco
    pork steaks -febras
    pork with clams -porco a alentejana
    pork -porco
    pork -carne de porco
    port wine -vinho de porto
    port -porto
    potato -batata
    prawns -Gambas
    pumpkin - abóbora


    rabbit -Coelho
    radish -rabanete
    rare steak -bife mal passado
    raspberry -Framboesa
    red mullet -salmonete
    red snapper -Pargo
    red wine -vinho tinto
    rib -entrecosto
    rice -Arroz
    roasted -Assado


    salad -salada
    salmon -salmão
    salt sal
    salted cod with egg and potatoes -bacalhau a bras
    sardines -sardinhas
    sauce -molho
    sausages -salsichas
    scabbard fish (sword fish) -peixe espada
    scrambled -mexido
    sea bream -dourada de mar
    sea bream -Besugo
    seafood rice -arroz de marisco
    seafood soup -sopa de marisco
    seafood -marisco
    shrimps -camarões
    silver bream -Sargo
    skate -raia
    skewer -espetada
    smoked -Fumado
    sole -linguado
    soup of the day -sopa do dia
    soup -Sopa
    sparkling water -água com gaz
    spicy sausage -chouriço
    spoon -Colher
    squid (grilled) -tufas (grelhadas)
    squid -Lulas
    steak -bife
    stew of fish seafood or meat -Cataplana
    stewed -estufada
    still water -água sem gaz
    stone bass -cherne
    strawberries -morangos
    sugar - Açúcar
    Sugar - Brazilian sugar cane is cana de acucar (that is with any Spanish speaking people) it is called caña de azucar. Cachaca is the alcoholic beverage extracted from the sugar cane.

    sweet wine -vinho doce


    tea -Chá
    thin steak topped with a fried egg -bife a portuguesa
    to drink- beber
    tomato juice -sumo de tomate
    tomato -tomate
    tongue -Lingual
    tripe dish with veal beans and spicy sausage -tripas à moda do Porto
    trout -Truta
    tuna -Atum
    turkey -peru


    veal -Vitela
    vegetable soup -sopa de legumes
    vegetables -Legumes
    very rare steak -muito mal passado
    vinegar -Vinagre


    water -água
    well done steak -bem passado
    white wine -vinho branco
    whiting -Corvine
    with ice -com gelo
    with milk -com leite


    yoghurt - Iogurte


    Last edited by kiwidutch on Sun Feb 17, 2008 11:13 am, edited 4 times in total
    French Tart
    Sun May 27, 2007 6:35 am
    Forum Host
    GREAT job Kiwi - thanks for all your hard work - and, I know it is hard!!!! We now have two lists posted, Spanish and Portuguese - and that is fantastic!! icon_biggrin.gif

    FT icon_biggrin.gif
    kiwidutch
    Sun May 27, 2007 8:38 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Thanks! I took inspiratioin from your list ...

    I'm looking for more to add too icon_smile.gif
    ThatSouthernBelle
    Mon May 28, 2007 10:02 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    What about Guaraná? I think it translates to "carbonated deliciousness from Brazil" icon_biggrin.gif Hehehe.
    kiwidutch
    Tue May 29, 2007 3:04 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Bella14Ragazza wrote:
    What about Guaraná? I think it translates to "carbonated deliciousness from Brazil" icon_biggrin.gif Hehehe.


    Thanks Bella ...

    DH didn't know that one and looked it up in his Portuguese dictionary: Brazilian shrub, seeds used to make a paste. ( we assume for food )

    wanting to know more I looked on the net...


    Guarana is an herbal stimulant that contains a form of caffeine called guaranine, which is 2.5 times stronger than the caffeine found in coffee, tea and soft drinks. What makes guaranine unique from caffeine found in beverages is its slower release. That's because the guarana seed is fatty (even in powder form) and is not readily water-soluble. Therefore the body does not quickly absorb it.

    Since the guaranine is released slowly, the energy boost that is experienced from guarana is not like that of coffee with its sudden rush and quick drop-off. Rather, it continues to escalate over hours.

    While caffeine from beverages provides a short-lived energy burst that overheats and excites the body, guaranine has a cooling action that revitalizes and relaxes. This is because guarana contains other components that modify the activity of this substance. The end result is more beneficial to the body than tea or coffee.

    Caffeine accelerates the effectiveness of CLA, thus making CLA a more potent fat burner. Guarana has been shown to stimulate the migration of lipids so fat can be burned as energy. It is also an appetite suppressant.

    Guarana aids in a temporary, natural increase in body temperature and metabolic thermogenesis through nutritional stimulation of the body's ß receptor pathway, which can induce the breakdown and release of stored body fat, thereby allowing stored fats to be turned into energy.

    Thermogenesis refers to the body's production of heat, a normal part of metabolic processes. Thermogenesis can be enhanced by certain nutritional substances. When stimulated through appropriate dietary supplementation, thermogenesis is also a mechanism that increases metabolic rate.
    Stored body fat, if released and available for use, can provide the fuel for this increased metabolic rate. Other active constituents of guarana are theobromine and theophylline, which are called xanthines (a class of thermogenic substances found in coffee, tea and certain beans). They have some effect on increasing metabolic rate, suppressing appetite and enhancing both physical and mental performance. They also act as muscle relaxants and possess diuretic properties.

    Guarana increases mental alertness, fights fatigue, and increases stamina and physical endurance. Native to Brazil, guarana is taken daily as a health tonic by millions of Brazilians. It is reported to help overcome heat fatigue, detoxify the blood and is useful for flatulence and obesity. In body care products, it has been used for its tonifying and astringent properties, and in the treatment of cellulite.


    In the United States, guarana holds a GRAS-status (Generally Regarded As Safe). In 1989 a patent was filed on a guarana seed extract that was capable of inhibiting platelet aggregation in mammals. The patent described guarana's ability to prevent the formation of blood clots and to help in the breakdown of clots that had already been formed. Clinical evidence was presented in conjunction with the patent in 1989 and again in 1991 by a Brazilian research group demonstrating these antiaggregation properties. Guarana has a long history of use as an energy tonic and for mental acuity enhancement.

    In a study published in the June 2001 issue of the Journal of Human Nutrition Diet, guarana extract induced weight loss over 45 days in overweight patients taking a mixed herbal preparation containing yerbe mate, guarana and damiana. Body weight reductions were 11.22 pounds in the guarana group compared to less than one pound in the placebo group after 45 days.[22]

    Guarana extract and fractions decreased platelet aggregation up to 37% of control values and platelet thromboxane formation from arachidonic acid up to 78% of control values. When platelets hyperaggregate and/or when excess thromboxane formation occurs, an arterial blood clot can develop, resulting in a heart attack or ischemic stroke.[23]

    Another Brazilian research group has been studying guarana's apparent effect of increasing memory. Its antibacterial properties against E. coli and Salmonella have been documented as well.

    A 1998 toxicology study with animals have shown that guarana is nontoxic at even high dosages of up to 2 grams per kilogram of body weight. This same study demonstrated guarana's antioxidant properties saying, "Guarana showed an antioxidant effect because, even at low concentrations (1.2 microg/ml), it inhibited the process of lipid peroxidation."[25]


    Do you think I should put it in as"

    Guarana = Brazilian beverage (contains 2.5 times stronger than the caffeine found in coffee, tea and soft drinks.)

    Since this seems to be primarily Brazillian, is my question would also be : it also known and used in Portugal? or would this more correctly belong in a South American Forum ?( if Zaar had one .. there isn't one at present)

    Even if it's little or unknown in Portugal, then I don't mind to still pop into the list, and if sometime in the future a South American Forum were to be made I could transfer it there in the future. yes?
    ThatSouthernBelle
    Tue May 29, 2007 2:54 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I just put it in because Brazil speaks Portuguese, and the can I had of it was in Portuguese, so you don't have to add it if you don't think it applies here. I just know that it's being exported to Spain and Portugal right now. icon_biggrin.gif

    Oh, it's also the "National" drink in Brazil. It looks like ginger ale. icon_wink.gif
    kiwidutch
    Tue May 29, 2007 4:34 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Bella14Ragazza wrote:
    I just put it in because Brazil speaks Portuguese, and the can I had of it was in Portuguese, so you don't have to add it if you don't think it applies here. I just know that it's being exported to Spain and Portugal right now. icon_biggrin.gif

    Oh, it's also the "National" drink in Brazil. It looks like ginger ale. icon_wink.gif


    yep, I did know that Brazilians speak Portuguese icon_biggrin.gif ... I have a workmate from Brazil and we chat a lot about food, geography, languages etc ...

    Unusually for a Brazilian, he follows rugby as much as football, and rugby in Brazil ... well icon_rolleyes.gif ...

    ...about as good as the NZ football team = hopeless... rotfl.gif

    ...the Brazilian football team and the NZ rugby team on the other hand... are worth supporting LOL

    If it's exported to Spain and Portugal than no problem, it's in...

    Looks like ginger ale but has 2.5 time the caffine as coffee..? wow ! have you tasted it? if so what does it taste like?

    I'm curious... I go to Cape Verde later this year.. who knows thay might have it there?
    dihujo
    Sun Feb 10, 2008 10:57 am
    Semi-Experienced "Sous Chef" Poster
    We have a fizzy soft drink called Guarana, so yes it can be included in this forum! I personally don't like it as I think it tastes like cough syrup. It was introduced here (Portugal) a few years back but wasn't much of a hit. it can be bought in cans and 1,5Lt bottles, it has a green and yellow stripy label.
    kiwidutch
    Sun Feb 10, 2008 11:15 am
    Food.com Groupie
    dihujo wrote:
    We have a fizzy soft drink called Guarana, so yes it can be included in this forum! I personally don't like it as I think it tastes like cough syrup. It was introduced here (Portugal) a few years back but wasn't much of a hit. it can be bought in cans and 1,5Lt bottles, it has a green and yellow stripy label.


    Hi Dihujo... wave.gif
    dang about the Guarana... I usually like to try new stuff and would have liked to have tried it when I was in Portugal last year.. . missed it !

    We hope to be back in PT next year, as this years travel schedule is fairy well booked up already... but if I can squeeze in a trip anywhere, then I will certainly try hard LOL...
    Chef #635722
    Fri Feb 22, 2008 9:44 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Can someone tell me the English definitions/American product equivalents of the following:

    requeijao

    crema de leite (is this condensed milk?)
    maizena (is this cornstarch?)
    fermento royal para bolo (is this yeast or baking powder or baking soda or a combination of any of them?)
    kiwidutch
    Fri Feb 22, 2008 2:42 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Dear Chef #635722, Welcome to Zaar wave.gif
    here are some answers hopefully to your questions.... I have put what I hope are the most helpful bits in "bold" ....

    crema de leite
    I wouldn't say that it is "condensed Milk" becuase: 2 latas de leite condensado =- 2 tins of condensed milk

    The RecipeZaar Kitchen Dictionary says:

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    crema de leche

    Meaning cream or milk in Spanish. It is whole milk pasteurized. It is a substance that is greasy, and has a yellowish, white color to it. It is used on fruits, salads and ice cream. It is also used in pastry shops, used to make a paste for soups or creams. Mainly found in specialty Mexican/Spanish shops or in the specialty section of your grocery store.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    the Portuguese version is: crema de leite
    http://www.nestle.com/Lifestyles/Cooking/AskGilla/CookingTips/Brazilian+products.htm

    Question:I am from Brazil and would like to know what are the substitutes for Leite Moca and Creme de Leite in the USA. I want to use Creme de Leite in some recipes like strogonoff but I don`t know what product to use in the USA. Thank you. Answer:Hi Rosana,
    Leite Moca is sweetened condensed milk and you will find this in the USA under the brand name Carnation. You can use this product in your recipes which use Nestlé Leite Moca. Creme de Leite is also available in the USA under the Nestlé brand name and is called Media Crema/Table Cream. This product is imported from Mexico and distributed by Nestlé USA. It is not available in all areas of the US however, and you would need to check with Nestlé Consumer Services (www.nestleusa.com/Public/ContactUs.aspx) the USA for availability in your area.
    If you cannot find this product you could consider using heavy cream in recipes such as strogonoff. You need to use a cream with high fat content (30-35%) in hot recipes as it needs to be able to withstand heating.Regards,
    Gilla
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Wikipedia says:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Requeij%C3%A3o

    Requeijão is a cream cheese made in Brazil and Portugal. It is white in color, has a mild taste and its consistency can vary from solid to creamy. Traditionally associated with the state of Minas Gerais, nowadays it is produced all over the country.

    Its most common variant is requeijão cremoso, very creamy in consistency; usually sold in glasses or plastic cups.



    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    maizena is the really easy one because it's exactly the same thing here in the Netherlands... what we call maizena is indeed called cornstarch / cornflour in other parts of the world.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    fermento royal para bolo

    fermento = yeast (rising agent)
    para = at, to, toward, towards
    bolo = cake

    ok it's clear that it's a rising agent and DH who speaks Portuguese read me a portuguese article on the famous Fermento Royal brand.. but it talks mostly about the establishment of the brand name rather than the contents of the tin LOL...

    I did find a recipe where the poster says:

    1 tbsp baking soda (if you can't find the Brazilian Fermento Royal)

    ... and someone here call it's "yeast for cakes"
    ou can certainly buy all types of flour in most supermarkets, wheat and corn and others. I saw the strong flour for bread in Carrefour in the retail park in Portimao in 5kgs bags at prices that don't break the bank unlike Thomas Green, Baptista and such likes.
    If you cannot find it use flour "farinha para usos culinarios" which is plain flour. For cakes, ie self-raising, is "farinha para bolos".
    Yeast is available easily, fresh you can buy at any bakery, it is called "fermento" and the powder type at any supermarket it is "fermento em pó para pão" for the quick variety. Yeast for cakes is "fermento para bolos". You will probably find the make is Royal and/or Fermipan.
    I must admit that I was worried about baking with Portuguese flour but had no problems whatsoever. It is cheap and does the job very well.
    I made a decision when I came to live in Portugal to try and get used to the local stuffs and without exceptions it has been easy.

    yeast for cakes? "yeast" is usually for breads, and baking powders / baking sodas are used in all the cakes I've ever baked ( not that i've baked every cake in the world so I could be wrong LOL)

    another entry says:

    FERMENTO ROYAL BAKING POWDER. BRAZIL,
    and another: Entao se baking soda é bicarbonato de sódio, baking powder deve ser o mesmo que o nosso fermento royal?

    DH's Portuguese Dictionary has references for:

    Baking Powder = Fermento Artificial
    Cooking Soda = bicarbonato de soda
    Bicarbonate of Soda = bicarbonato de sódio


    to be completely honest I don't now know if your "fermento Royal" is baking powder or baking soda ... but maybe one of our members living in Portugal can help us further with this one .. at least hopefully you are one step ahead with the rest of the information... icon_wink.gif
    Chef #635722
    Fri Feb 22, 2008 3:15 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    thanks for all your info

    Anyone know if there are any low-fat substitutes for these items we are talking about. Can I sub fat-free ricotta and evap. fat free milk? Will that work?
    kiwidutch
    Sat Feb 23, 2008 3:30 am
    Food.com Groupie
    [quote="Chef #635722"]thanks for all your info

    Anyone know if there are any low-fat substitutes for these items we are talking about. Can I sub fat-free ricotta and evap. fat free milk? Will that work?[/quote]

    Could we please know what kind of recipes you are intending to use these in?

    Using lower fat products in some recipes works far better than in others so some more information would be most valuable to estimate what the outsome would / could be.... icon_biggrin.gif
    Chef #635722
    Sat Feb 23, 2008 8:05 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    My babysitter wants to make lasagne using the ingredients we have been discussing. Wouldn't fat free ricotta substitute? What about evap. skim milk for the creme? I use fat free ricotta and it is fine.Thanks for any help.
    kiwidutch
    Sat Feb 23, 2008 8:45 am
    Food.com Groupie
    [quote="Chef #635722"]My babysitter wants to make lasagne using the ingredients we have been discussing. Wouldn't fat free ricotta substitute? What about evap. skim milk for the creme? I use fat free ricotta and it is fine.Thanks for any help.[/quote]

    I think that in a lasagne it should be ok... any subtle loss of flavour due to using lower fat ingredients wouldn't be noticeable in the mix of other flavours.

    The texture might be a little more liquid because many lower fat products are thinner in consistancy... so maybe you'd want to start with a sauce that you'd thickened up a little more than usual .. possibly ?
    I have to get my evaporated milk from a British speciality shop here, and it's just the one regular type, no skim etc available here so I'm no expert on that one sorry icon_redface.gif ..... ricotta we get in the supermarket but again.. no fat free that I have seen anywhere I shop.

    DO please let me know how you go with your lasagne... I'd love to know the result of your experimentation icon_biggrin.gif
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