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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / French, Creole and Cajun Cuisine / The French Menu & Kitchen Explained - French to English
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    The French Menu & Kitchen Explained - French to English

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    French Tart
    Tue May 01, 2007 3:55 pm
    Forum Host
    Wow Zurie - to an avid language learner/watcher like me - your post is fascinating!!! Now - how is your history on Walloon French?? This is a new subject close to my heart!!


    Walloon (Walon) is a regional Romance language spoken as a second language by some in Wallonia (Belgium). It belongs to the langue d'oïl language family, whose most prominent member is the French language, and is sometimes considered a French dialect. Walloon should not be confused with Belgian French, which differs from the French spoken in France only in some minor points of vocabulary and pronunciation & numbers.....................I heard it a lot on the ferry coming home! I am now looking into it, it's just fascinating!!!

    I am glad you found your Cod fish eventually!!!!!

    FT icon_biggrin.gif

    (P.S. Some intersting points of grammar......................Some linguists classify Walloon as a dialect of French, but it began developing a distinct character as early as the 8th century and acquired its own name by the 16th century. The differences are significant enough that many consider Walloon a distinct language (though unquestionably a close relative of French). For example, in French, the word for “the” takes on a different form depending on the gender of the noun that follows it; in Walloon, as in English, the definite article is always the same. Walloon, unlike French, also uses a single word to mean “his” or “her.” Word order is different (adjectives usually come before the noun, whereas they follow the noun in French), and there are numerous differences in spelling, pronunciation, and vocabulary. Furthermore, Walloon itself has four distinct dialects, each concentrated in a different region of Wallonia.

    Where’s Wallonia?
    Wallonia? Yes indeed, Wallonia is the name for a region covering roughly the southern half of Belgium. Although this is home to Walloon, that is by no means the only language spoken there; French is of course the official language, and there’s also a local, “Walloonized” version of French—plus several other languages in the same family. When thousands of Walloons (as the residents are called) moved to North America in the mid-1800s, they settled in a corner of eastern Wisconsin near Lake Michigan, where there were already some French Canadian residents. By and large, the Belgian immigrants continued speaking their native language, which over the past 150 years has apparently changed less than any of the Walloon dialects spoken in Belgium. Other than Green Bay and Wallonia, the only places where you can still find communities of active Walloon speakers are Brussels and a few small villages in northeastern France.)
    JoyfulCook
    Wed May 02, 2007 2:25 am
    Forum Host
    Its all been so interesting - and the history into how and why things differ..... very much like Kswahili and the local dialects.... that changes so often - that it can even be embarrassing.

    Where do I find the dictionary please.
    French Tart
    Wed May 02, 2007 4:30 am
    Forum Host
    JoyfulCook wrote:
    Its all been so interesting - and the history into how and why things differ..... very much like Kswahili and the local dialects.... that changes so often - that it can even be embarrassing.

    Where do I find the dictionary please.


    Hi Joy - it is on page one of this thread.....................go to page 1!!!!!!!!!!
    FT icon_biggrin.gif
    JoyfulCook
    Wed May 02, 2007 5:48 am
    Forum Host
    French Tart wrote:
    JoyfulCook wrote:
    Its all been so interesting - and the history into how and why things differ..... very much like Kswahili and the local dialects.... that changes so often - that it can even be embarrassing.

    Where do I find the dictionary please.


    Hi Joy - it is on page one of this thread.....................go to page 1!!!!!!!!!!
    FT icon_biggrin.gif
    icon_redface.gif
    French Tart
    Wed May 02, 2007 8:59 am
    Forum Host
    JoyfulCook wrote:
    French Tart wrote:
    JoyfulCook wrote:
    Its all been so interesting - and the history into how and why things differ..... very much like Kswahili and the local dialects.... that changes so often - that it can even be embarrassing.

    Where do I find the dictionary please.


    Hi Joy - it is on page one of this thread.....................go to page 1!!!!!!!!!!
    FT icon_biggrin.gif
    icon_redface.gif

    Silly billy!!!!!! icon_rolleyes.gif icon_rolleyes.gif icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif
    French Tart
    Wed May 02, 2007 9:00 am
    Forum Host
    JoyfulCook wrote:
    French Tart wrote:
    JoyfulCook wrote:
    Its all been so interesting - and the history into how and why things differ..... very much like Kswahili and the local dialects.... that changes so often - that it can even be embarrassing.

    Where do I find the dictionary please.


    Hi Joy - it is on page one of this thread.....................go to page 1!!!!!!!!!!
    FT icon_biggrin.gif
    icon_redface.gif


    Silly billy........... icon_rolleyes.gif icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif
    Queen Dragon Mom
    Fri May 04, 2007 4:25 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I think I had better print all that out and tape it up inside a cupboard door.
    French Tart
    Fri May 04, 2007 4:58 pm
    Forum Host
    Queen Dragon Mom wrote:
    I think I had better print all that out and tape it up inside a cupboard door.


    Have you got a LARGE cupboard door QDM??!!!!!! There is loads missing - but where do you stop???? icon_eek.gif
    FT icon_biggrin.gif
    Queen Dragon Mom
    Fri May 04, 2007 5:27 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    French Tart wrote:
    Queen Dragon Mom wrote:
    I think I had better print all that out and tape it up inside a cupboard door.


    Have you got a LARGE cupboard door QDM??!!!!!! There is loads missing - but where do you stop???? icon_eek.gif
    FT icon_biggrin.gif

    Yeah, and I think that you did a heck of a job with what you have already put up. My fingers would fall off after all that.... icon_confused.gif
    French Tart
    Fri May 04, 2007 5:38 pm
    Forum Host
    Queen Dragon Mom wrote:
    French Tart wrote:
    Queen Dragon Mom wrote:
    I think I had better print all that out and tape it up inside a cupboard door.


    Have you got a LARGE cupboard door QDM??!!!!!! There is loads missing - but where do you stop???? icon_eek.gif
    FT icon_biggrin.gif

    Yeah, and I think that you did a heck of a job with what you have already put up. My fingers would fall off after all that.... icon_confused.gif

    It wasn't my fingers but my brain hurt!!!!! icon_rolleyes.gif icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif
    Bokenpop aka Madeleine
    Fri May 04, 2007 6:15 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    French Tart, You certainly have put an incredible amount of work into this reference library of French Cookery Terms. Thank you for doing this for all of us! icon_biggrin.gif
    French Tart
    Sat May 05, 2007 4:23 am
    Forum Host
    Bokenpop wrote:
    French Tart, You certainly have put an incredible amount of work into this reference library of French Cookery Terms. Thank you for doing this for all of us! icon_biggrin.gif


    Hi Bokenpop!!!! Thanks! I thought it might be a useful tool and a good idea to debunk the myth of French food........that there is somewhere to look up words you don't know!!!! Now, an Afikaans one might be a good idea too!!! Only joking - as Maddy sinks into the carpet.................. icon_eek.gif icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif
    FT icon_biggrin.gif
    -------
    Sun Jan 20, 2008 6:51 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Thanks, FT icon_biggrin.gif
    French Tart
    Mon Jan 21, 2008 5:24 am
    Forum Host
    chefinmiddleschool wrote:
    Thanks, FT icon_biggrin.gif

    De rien encore!
    FT icon_biggrin.gif
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