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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Emergency Food/Supplies / Disaster Preparedness-Food Storage
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    Disaster Preparedness-Food Storage

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    Chef on the coast
    Tue Jan 15, 2008 3:55 pm
    Forum Host
    Thanks for posting Bags. People may find these links helpful. Come and join us often! icon_smile.gif
    -------
    Sun Jan 20, 2008 11:54 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I think things like raisins, jerked meat, prunes, trail mix, & dates would be sufficiant. icon_biggrin.gif
    John DOH
    Mon Jan 21, 2008 12:11 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Nice thought, but it doesn't work without you add 2-3 litres of potable water per man per day perhaps! (If not more! Try that diet for ONE DAY! You'll start understanding what "dying of thirst" is all about, let alone what the fruits, veggies and "traces" in your regular diet are doing for you...

    John
    UnknownChef86
    Mon Jan 21, 2008 1:26 am
    Forum Host
    chefinmiddleschool wrote:
    I think things like raisins, jerked meat, prunes, trail mix, & dates would be sufficiant. icon_biggrin.gif

    Welcome to the Emergency Food/Supplies forum, CIMS! We're always glad to see new faces in here, and I'm particularly glad to see someone of your age interested in this topic. It's a great skill to have as you're planning, both for now and for your own future home.

    The foods you chose are good ones, high in carbs and protein, and will last for short-term emergencies...but eating the same few supplies would get old quickly. Imagine that being all that you had to eat for a month. Yes, you could survive on it, but...maybe not so happily by the end of the month! Also, your body will need other nutrients that those foods can't provide...it's why a varied diet is important. Nutritional supplements (vitamins) will help cover some of the missing gaps, but it's important to factor other foods in ahead of time so there won't be as many gaps. icon_biggrin.gif icon_wink.gif

    John has a point when he mentions the water...it would be a necessity for a number of reasons. When you eat dried foods like that, your body will take the moisture from somewhere...and since we're walking water-bottles to a degree (98% water), the body will be most effective about using the water at hand. The problem with that is that there are good reasons we're 98% water...we need that water balance to survive. The bowels, kidneys, liver, brain, cell structure...all start having problems if we don't maintain a reasonable water ratio. It's why people have so many problems when they get dehydrated. Organ systems start shutting down. You can last longer without food than you can without water.

    It's a good idea to have at least fourteen days worth of water (two gallons per person, per day) on hand at all times. That's just for drinking, brushing teeth, etc...that doesn't including toilet flushing, bathing, etc.

    Welcome to EF/S again, CIMS...I look forward to seeing you in here more often.

    Take care and God bless. icon_wink.gif
    John DOH
    Mon Jan 21, 2008 3:09 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Two gallons per day is "excessive" to "survival related" bodily need, tho' when you get down on water, every extra drop is favourable...
    In my days of soldiering, you could take a cup of water, and brush your teeth, then use the same to wash your face and hands; and then use the same liquid to shave with...its not "fun", but if its necessary, you can get on with a lot less water than we are used to having, and "survive", reasonably happily...
    About 30 years ago, I "did" three weeks in the "bushes" of CFB Gagetown, as a Platoon Sgt, where I was handing out the rations to my 30 odd guys, and it was in the "book" that you needed to record the ration handed to each man, each day, that it was "varied"...nobody said that you had the same option or priviledge....and I wound up eating the same RP4 for 21 days, and so I can tell you that it gets very stale, very quickly, and takes some personal discipline to make yourself eat at all, after the first week or two (fortunately, there were a couple training staff NCO's who invited me to breakfast; they weren't on the same program! -they had a jeepto get 20 miles back to base, and a cooler!- and the fresh eggs, bacon and coffee from them went a long, lllooonnngg way to making it back to a mess and a restaurant and some serious steak dinner WITH all the veggies I could stuff down the pie hole...have never liked canned sardines, Vienna sausage or dessert crackers since!)(Note part of our solution to the lack of water was to pile into the local "river" each afternoon, before dinner, and soap ourselves down-with clothing on- then rinse the clothing out, and leave it dry on a rock, so in a day or so we had a clean uniform....

    My thoughts only!

    John
    ejmatl
    Tue Jan 22, 2008 6:13 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Note to Bags:

    Great reference materials! I've bookmarked the sites you mentioned and am, in fact, going to purchase some of the food products from Thrive/Self Reliance. Their prices are really quite good.

    And I love your sense of humour - a necessary element in survival situations.

    eileen
    ejmatl
    Tue Jan 22, 2008 6:24 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Note to CIMS:

    Hey! Welcome! As others have mentioned, you're off to a great start with regard to preparedness.

    I read your profile - and see that not only do you love to cook, but have some very strong mentors in that regard. I also see you love italian food. Now think of it this way: You've been without power for five days. You're tired of jerky and trail mix (and your body hates you for subjecting it to nothing but jerky and trail mix). You're craving some spaghetti with meat sauce. Wouldn't it be cool if you could have some of that? And wouldn't it be even more cool if the spaghetti with meat sauce you have was actually made in your kitchen, then dehydrated for use during said power outage?

    I live in the PNW - so being prepared is a part of day-to-day life, not just something we think about in passing. I like to cook - but, more so, I like to eat - and eat well - even during disasters. So sometimes when I cook I make extra, dehydrate it, vacuum seal it and stash it away (dated, of course) "just in case". So with this in mind I'm going to give you a challenge: Next time you make spaghetti and meat sauce make a little extra, dehydrate it, vacuum seal it and stash it away for just a few days. After those few days are up, rehydrate it and eat it. Oh, and then report back icon_smile.gif

    Again, welcome.

    eileen
    MommaEllen
    Fri Feb 08, 2008 9:27 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Interesting thread, just had a thought. After a winter power outage( or was it when my freezer broke? can't remember which) we stored food outside in our BBQ grill so the neighborhood critters couldn't get to it because of the heavy lid, and the food still stayed cold, since it was below 25 degrees outside anyways. Worked for the short outage, not a long term solution. Thinking "outside" the box!
    Chef on the coast
    Fri Feb 08, 2008 9:31 pm
    Forum Host
    [quote="MommaEllen/MommaEllen/Chef #727055"]Interesting thread, just had a thought. After a winter power outage( or was it when my freezer broke? can't remember which) we stored food outside in our BBQ grill so the neighborhood critters couldn't get to it because of the heavy lid, and the food still stayed cold, since it was below 25 degrees outside anyways. Worked for the short outage, not a long term solution. Thinking "outside" the box![/quote]

    That is a great idea! Thinking "outside" the box is something to definitely keep in mind when we have these types of experiences - as these experiences definitely are not "inside" the box! icon_smile.gif I love the BBQ grill idea. Thanks for sharing.
    Chef #871434
    Tue Jun 24, 2008 12:56 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    A great resource that I made for my family, is a food storage calculator that will take into account how many months storage you want, and how many are in your family. It will then tell you WHAT you need and keep track of what you HAVE.

    http://www.stockupfood.com

    Please reply with any suggestions or additions you would like to see.
    Chef Carol Kay
    Tue Jun 24, 2008 5:33 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    [quote="Chef #871434"]A great resource that I made for my family, is a food storage calculator that will take into account how many months storage you want, and how many are in your family. It will then tell you WHAT you need and keep track of what you HAVE.

    http://www.stockupfood.com

    Please reply with any suggestions or additions you would like to see.[/quote]
    I just checked this out, and I like the idea. I played around with it and it is really a nice helper to get you started. I just wish it had a place to add your own personnel must haves, because everyone's a little different. Thanks for sharing the website.
    Chef on the coast
    Tue Jun 24, 2008 8:01 pm
    Forum Host
    Chef Carol Kay wrote:
    [quote="Chef #871434"]A great resource that I made for my family, is a food storage calculator that will take into account how many months storage you want, and how many are in your family. It will then tell you WHAT you need and keep track of what you HAVE.

    http://www.stockupfood.com

    Please reply with any suggestions or additions you would like to see.

    I just checked this out, and I like the idea. I played around with it and it is really a nice helper to get you started. I just wish it had a place to add your own personnel must haves, because everyone's a little different. Thanks for sharing the website.[/quote]

    Take your musthaves and times it by how many people use and how often.
    Gabby LSW
    Wed Jun 25, 2008 8:19 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I may be missing something...

    I started looking at the storage calculator and it suggests 30 lbs of sugar for a 3 month stock for 3 adults.

    I don't think we've used 5 lbs of sugar this YEAR. Am I that out of sync with what the general population uses?

    Gabby
    Chef #871434
    Wed Jun 25, 2008 12:05 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    The ability to have "must haves" is a great idea. That is actually a common response I have been getting. I am trying to figure out a way to accomplish that.

    Thank you for your input, please post more suggestions!
    Chef Carol Kay
    Wed Jun 25, 2008 12:07 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Now that I look at it, it has 20 pounds of sugar for 1 month for 6 adults. That is alot but I didn't think much of it, since between my baking and my son's need for really sugary kool aid we just might go through that icon_lol.gif
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