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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Cooking Q & A / Instant Cooking Remedies
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    Instant Cooking Remedies

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    aprons
    Thu Jan 31, 2008 10:40 am
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    I just saw your post about roux, have you ever tried Gold Medal Wondra flour? It is in with the other flours, in a shaker type blue can. After I open mine I keep it in the refrigerator, but I don't think you have to. It says "For Sauces and Gravies" on the front of the can and it is just perfect for these.
    blancpage
    Thu Jan 31, 2008 10:54 am
    Food.com Groupie
    aprons wrote:
    Hi blancpage, I didn't write that very well, icon_redface.gif I didn't mean that albacore could taste metallic, although I guess it's possible to get a bad can--although I never have--I meant the tuna packed in water is lots of times fishy and metallic smelling. The bad news is I have read before that albacore, for some reason, may contain higher levels of mercury, which is a shame because it is such good tuna. But just because something is in print doesn't mean it is the Gospel truth. I think albacore is the prime rib of tuna, and I buy it if I can.


    Ahh, np, Aprons, thank you for the clarification. I, too, have read somewhere that albacore might contain more mercury, however I don't eat it very often. I really love those pouches that they make now, however, those are at least twice the cost of a 6oz can, especially if I try for albacore in the pouch, but the pouch is so much easier and less messy! LOL. I've actually only run across metallic-smellnig or tasting tuna in water in a can once that I can remember. Not only that, but I was very disappointed that the tuna itself tasted a lot fishier than I expected for chunk light in water, and it was a very large (4lb can lol) from Costco that I had to toss. I was afraid to eat more than I already had because of the taste/smell. Talk about frustrating; tried to be cost-effective, ended up throwing away all of it. Granted, I'd had it in my cupboard for several months, but I know it wasn't supposed to expire for awhile, but as you already mentioned expiration dates aren't perfect if the food itself is bad already. Oh well... Anyway, there I go rambling again! Thanks again for the helpful info. icon_smile.gif
    Tonikayk
    Tue Feb 05, 2008 10:23 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    I would like to make a pitch for Wondra also. The only way you can get a lump is to import it from another location. I used it for years, and it helped me learn to work with other thickening agents. It is a very fine flour and helps to changes the rules, especially for new cooks.
    blancpage
    Tue Feb 05, 2008 11:11 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Tonikayk wrote:
    I would like to make a pitch for Wondra also. The only way you can get a lump is to import it from another location. I used it for years, and it helped me learn to work with other thickening agents. It is a very fine flour and helps to changes the rules, especially for new cooks.


    Ahh, that makes sense, I'll have to do some research on Wondra flour. Thank you. icon_smile.gif
    HealthyChocolate
    Thu Feb 07, 2008 10:50 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Hi Randy Possumgirl,

    What kind of oil did you use for your raisin biscuits? Would canola oil work?

    Thanks!
    icon_smile.gif
    foodtvfan
    Mon Feb 25, 2008 11:04 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Tanika Amaranth wrote:
    This full of some really great advice.
    I have a question of my own though, I have come across numerous recipes that require " baking mix " too be used, I am in Australia and haven't seen this term before.
    Could someone tell me what it is or a good alternative, thanks.
    ~ Tanika


    Here are the recipes for homemade mixes that I have collected in this cookbook which might be helpful:
    http://www.recipezaar.com/cookbook.php?bookid=83411

    icon_smile.gif burnice
    Queen Dragon Mom
    Sat Oct 11, 2008 1:20 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    For badly burned-on foods, dampen the burned portion and sprinkle either baking soda or washing soda evenly across the surface. Let sit for several hours or overnight. The burned stuff should lift right out or be easier to scrub off.
    blancpage
    Sun Oct 12, 2008 8:48 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Queen Dragon Mom wrote:
    For badly burned-on foods, dampen the burned portion and sprinkle either baking soda or washing soda evenly across the surface. Let sit for several hours or overnight. The burned stuff should lift right out or be easier to scrub off.


    Hi Queen Dragon Mom, I actually used this method not too long ago on my electric skillet. Unfortunately there was previous damage done to the poor thing, but the burned food did come off nicely following the method of hot water and baking soda. Thanks for sharing. icon_smile.gif

    -Sommer (aka blancpage)
    blancpage
    Sun Oct 12, 2008 8:48 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    foodtvfan wrote:
    Tanika Amaranth wrote:
    This full of some really great advice.
    I have a question of my own though, I have come across numerous recipes that require " baking mix " too be used, I am in Australia and haven't seen this term before.
    Could someone tell me what it is or a good alternative, thanks.
    ~ Tanika


    Here are the recipes for homemade mixes that I have collected in this cookbook which might be helpful:
    http://www.recipezaar.com/cookbook.php?bookid=83411

    icon_smile.gif burnice


    Awesome, thanks Burnice, I added this cookbook to my favorites! icon_smile.gif

    -Sommer (aka blancpage)
    cydon
    Tue Nov 25, 2008 7:13 pm
    Semi-Experienced "Sous Chef" Poster
    I'd like to offer a tip I discovered today, which may seem fairly obvious... if like me you lack a pestle and mortar (or at least one that's not had all kinds of chemicals on it), and need to crush something like black pepper or in my case szechuan pepper, put it in a sandwich bag and stand on it.
    mexicanfood
    Tue Dec 16, 2008 12:36 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    how do i ship fudge without it melting or sticking together
    blancpage
    Tue Dec 16, 2008 8:58 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    cydon wrote:
    I'd like to offer a tip I discovered today, which may seem fairly obvious... if like me you lack a pestle and mortar (or at least one that's not had all kinds of chemicals on it), and need to crush something like black pepper or in my case szechuan pepper, put it in a sandwich bag and stand on it.


    That's brilliant, no I never thought of that idea, thanks for sharing cydon. icon_biggrin.gif
    YnkyGrlDwndr
    Thu Dec 25, 2008 9:56 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    I picked up this tip recently of a cooking show. When making curries or even a stew or soup I would think.... add the called for water/liquid as hot rather than room temperature. This will keep the meat nice and tender, I tried it and it works a treat! I can really tell the difference! They said on the show that cold water will shock the meat and tighten it up.
    Mims Cookin
    Thu Feb 05, 2009 11:47 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    Queen Dragon Mom wrote:
    For badly burned-on foods, dampen the burned portion and sprinkle either baking soda or washing soda evenly across the surface. Let sit for several hours or overnight. The burned stuff should lift right out or be easier to scrub off.


    If the burned on food is really bad and I have time to be nearby I put water in pot add a small drop of dish soap and put on a low low simmer to soften.

    Also a cleansing powder called Bar Keepers Friend is fantastic for cleaning pots. Especially if they are semi non-stick, it is not abrasive, yet it cleans nicely. It can also be used the same way as baking soda in letting it sit while pan is damp so a light paste is formed over surface of pan. If needed use a non abrasive sponge to work off the rest.
    Mims Cookin
    Thu Feb 05, 2009 11:50 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    nursevb8 wrote:
    I usually wrap my rolls or bread in my heating pad on warm, You don't use it often so I figured might as well put it to good use. Keeps them at a constant temperature to raise nicely.


    What a clever ingenious idea. If the bread is wrapped in foil.. no worry about cross contamination from personal use. Never would have thought of this.
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