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    Lost? Site Map

    Anyone else out there allergic to soy?

    Go to page << Previous Page  1, 2, 3, 4  Next Page >>
    Taramsl
    Mon May 12, 2008 7:53 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    My son is 20 months and is allergic to dairy and soy (as well as eggs and peanuts)...A few quick comments

    1) It really does get easier, and you will learn what you can cook, and start to eat less processed foods.

    2) Check with your doctor. according to faaan.org (food allergy and anaphalaxysis network), and my allergist, many people who are soy allergic can eat soybean oil and soy lecithin....that helps quite a bit.

    What types of foods are you particularly having trouble with, maybe I can make some suggestions....

    Tara ! icon_smile.gif
    Nurse Hamster
    Sun Jun 15, 2008 1:50 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    I am not allergic to soy but I share your frustration. I don't want to put myself at risk for breast cancer and soy tends to bring out feminine qualities in the male gender from the plant estrogens. I cant find hardly a cracker or cookie or snack or any convenience food for that matter that doesn't have soy or soy oil in it. I also have been avoiding nitrates and nitrites in meats, bovine growth hormone in milk, anything hydrolyzed or autolyzed, MSG (Monosodium Glutamate), Nutrasweet, Splenda, and any other of the sugar alcohols. I didn't even touch on GMO's (genetically manufactured organisms). It makes for interesting shopping. I am having to make my own salad dressing, bread, cookies and don't buy any frozen meals or box foods. Basically I am down to eating fruits, veggies, meats, milk products, nuts, berries, whole grains and homemade baked goods in their purest forms. I cleared land and planted fruit and nut trees, berries and a garden. I raise chickens and sheep now and go to a local dairy that is licensed to sell raw milk. I would like to hold the FDA accountable for the chemical soup that they allow food corporations to sell us. They can disguise things on labels under other names other than what it is. I feel very sorry for you having an allergy because you HAVE to avoid soy. I have a choice to not eat it.
    Chocolate Joy
    Wed Jul 02, 2008 10:04 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    For all those who are allergic to soy (like me!) and miss chocolate - try hitting up your local health food store. I have found several brands of chocolate bars that do not contain soy lecithin! (and have superior taste!) I shop at Whole Foods Market (which is unfortunately 2.5 hours drive away) and stock up on various soy-free items.
    Soy free chocolate brands:
    365 everyday organic, Terra Nostra, Dagoba (though check the ingredients...I think some of the bars have soy)
    There is one more...it's my absolute favorite...but the name is escaping me. It's a fair-trade brand as are several of the other soy-free types.
    Other ways to get your chocolate fix: make brownies or other tasty chocolaty things from scratch. Just make recipes calling for baking chocolate or cocoa...and avoid chocolate chips and such.

    Also - may I suggest buying a bread machine. I have usually only been able to find completely soy-free bread at health food stores, and it costs at least $4 a loaf. My husband bought me a bread machine and I make a couple 1.5 pound loaves each week. It is so much cheaper, healthier, and the texture and flavor are superior to store bought.
    Chocolate Joy
    Sat Jul 05, 2008 10:35 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    I remembered the other brand of chocolate bar without soy. It's called Alter Eco. (It's my favorite!)
    Chef #1308331
    Sat Jun 27, 2009 9:30 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    My son has systemic juvenile arthritis and I think it is because he has an autoimmune reaction also to soy. I had him tested for food allergies, and he was borderline allergic to soy. How did you test for an autoimmune reaction to soy, and what is your autoimmune reaction? My son's rheumatologist refuses to believe that his arthritis is due to allergies, but deep down I really do, so if there is a test to determine that it's an autoimmune reaction then that would be great! Please help by answering. My son is only 7 and he's going through so much pain. Like everyone else, it's so hard to find food that has no soy.
    Chocolate Joy
    Mon Jun 29, 2009 11:34 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Any allergy is a reaction from the body's immune system. There is so much about allergies that has not been fully researched - but just because the doctor thinks that there isn't a connection between your son's allergy and his arthritis, it doesn't mean there isn't one. I personally know several people whose very serious health problems cleared up or got better once they dealt with their food allergies. Everything from seisures to chronic kidney infections.

    The best thing to do is completely eliminate all forms of soy in your son's diet. It requires a lot of home cooking, but it is so worth it! You will want to be wary of store bought breads, sauces, packaged prepared foods, and things with chocolate (will contain soy lecithin) in them. At first you will also want to eliminate soybean oil as well. Read the ingredients of EVERYTHING. Most foods will list common allergens included in bold at the bottom of the ingredients but don't rely on that. Watch for soy flour, soy protein, soy lecithin, edamame, and such. I make all my bread from scratch, but you can usually find soy-free breads at health food stores (e.g. Whole Foods or such) but at first watch out for soybean oil. (ALL the pre-sliced sandwich breads will have soy flour in them - unless your store carries an organic brand - which might be ok) The fresh baked breads at your local grocery will be sort of hit-and-miss. Oh- and if he takes vitamin supliments - check those too!

    I would say to go completely soy-free for a month and see if your son improves. If it is the soy, you may see an improvement in less time (it was just over a week for me to notice) but keep at it for a while just to make sure. After several months of improvement, you can try adding soybean oil back in to see if he reacts to it. Many people with soy allergies don't (but some do!).

    Good luck! Keep posting on how it's going!
    FoodAllergyFairy
    Sun Jul 12, 2009 1:27 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Just saw these posts on soy allergy and just wanted to let you know I'm currently building a HUGE website on SOY allergy and Peanut allergy as I am FED UP with standing for HOURS in the grocery store reading labels and I feel we need a safe haven to see LISTS, LISTS AND MORE LISTS of WHAT we can eat and names of soy or nut derivatives. We also need a place to connect with others, support each other with ideas and advice and inspire ACTION!
    Until the site becomes truly complicated and overloaded, I am keeping it FREE to all who want or need the info!!!! Hopefully together, we can make a difference. I will even be setting up petitions for specific people in power having to do with soy/peanut products...

    (Most likely if all goes well, I will have it done by Monday 7/20/2009)

    PLEASE send me your email addy and name so I can send you the link to the site as soon as I am finished! Send it to foodallergyfairy@live.com

    Thank you for your time and I look forward to meeting all of you!

    Maya
    Chef #794946
    Thu Jul 16, 2009 9:00 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    My 3mo son is allergic to milk and soy proteins, so I've had to eliminate them from my diet. I've found a few bread products at Trader Joe's that are soy free - their own brand of wheat pitas, a few loaves of bread, ciabatta rolls and whole wheat bagels (actually wheat bagels anywhere are usually soy free). I've also found some great recipes online that use coconut oil instead of vegetable oil for baking, and they look delicious. Oh, and goat's milk yogurt (also Trader Joe's) is actually really good...much like greek style/plain yogurt. Whole Foods carries a goat butter, but I haven't tried that yet.
    Taramsl
    Thu Jul 16, 2009 9:33 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    Check with your dr. on goat's milk - I'm not sure about that. Also, benecol margarine, fleischmann's light (I think), and Mother's kosher margarine (our favorite). If you like to cook, check out the book artisan bread in 5 min a day.

    I think vegetable oil should be ok.

    My 2 1/2 year old son is allergic to milk, soy, eggs peanuts, and shellfish, so I know where you are coming from . My 3 month old I am pretty sure is allergic to milk, and I don't know what else, if anything yet.
    Tara
    FoodAllergyFairy
    Thu Jul 16, 2009 11:13 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    [quote="Chef #794946"]My 3mo son is allergic to milk and soy proteins, so I've had to eliminate them from my diet. I've found a few bread products at Trader Joe's that are soy free - their own brand of wheat pitas, a few loaves of bread, ciabatta rolls and whole wheat bagels (actually wheat bagels anywhere are usually soy free). I've also found some great recipes online that use coconut oil instead of vegetable oil for baking, and they look delicious. Oh, and goat's milk yogurt (also Trader Joe's) is actually really good...much like greek style/plain yogurt. Whole Foods carries a goat butter, but I haven't tried that yet.[/quote]

    You would think that breads would be okay, but I'm only questioning this because I used to work at Trader Joe's as a mural artist (I may as well have worked for Planter's...)
    and EVERYTHING in the breads or bakery table had that 'made on equipment with soy' or 'may contain soy/peanuts/tree nuts' labeling in TINY PRINT.
    I discovered this after breaking out in mysterious horrible rashes after eating the OH SO DELICIOUS Ciabatta breads. (I have anaphylaxis to peanuts/tree-nuts/tofu and very bad rashes/eczema to soy...eventually had to leave TJ'S because even just touching the computer in the back was sending me home on Benadryl/Atarax around the clock) As you may already know, peanuts and soy are from the same legume family....so most people who suffer from an allergy to one, also have it to the other. Consequently, the made on equipment with peanuts may apply to your son as well...

    Also be aware of SOY derivatives, such as soy lecithin, guar gum (in alot of sorbets and ice creams), most Vitamin E (in alot of skincare and vitamins) and 'natural flavors' is usually from soy as well (which is why I get bad rashes from Coke and Pepsi). Soybean oil makes me rash out as well, contrary to popular belief of it being okay.

    Those mysterious rashes aren't so mysterious after all, once we decode the hidden names in EVERYTHING, eh?

    Yes, I got frustrated too...and built a site.

    Please check it out and be sure to read my BLOG which I will be updating almost every day!

    www.mayashappyplace.com

    Hope this all helps!
    FoodAllergyFairy
    Thu Jul 16, 2009 11:39 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    [quote="Chef #1308331"]My son has systemic juvenile arthritis and I think it is because he has an autoimmune reaction also to soy. I had him tested for food allergies, and he was borderline allergic to soy. How did you test for an autoimmune reaction to soy, and what is your autoimmune reaction? My son's rheumatologist refuses to believe that his arthritis is due to allergies, but deep down I really do, so if there is a test to determine that it's an autoimmune reaction then that would be great! Please help by answering. My son is only 7 and he's going through so much pain. Like everyone else, it's so hard to find food that has no soy.[/quote]

    By definition, a food allergy IS an autoimmune reaction to the substance so YES, in my opinion (and I'm no medical expert so please don't quote me on this), the soy allergy may be compromising his immune system. I am 28 years old and have had the peanut, tree-nut, soy allergies since I was a baby, so experience should count for something, I hope.

    My aunt has psoriatic arthritis which is possibly closer to the pain of what your son goes through. She cannot eat sugar, anything carbohydrate that turns to sugar and has to cut down red meat and even fruits since most have too much sugar. She told me that these all lower her immune system and cause her to have horrible pains through her body along with rashes that make her look like a burn victim. So she avoids them at all costs. I know its very hard to avoid soy (believe me, I know) but its probably one of the most important things he can do to help alleviate the pain. Nothing worth anything in life, is easy, right? Haha, always loved that quote.

    Its a shame that the rheumatologist doesn't see a link. Food allergies and even environmental allergies can lower the immune system for DAYS, sometimes longer if still present in the body. Your validation will come from going to a good allergist, I'm talking typing in Google, 'Best Allergist in (whatever state you're in here)' and going to that doctor asap to talk about your concerns. I have noticed a DEFINITE link to my immune system and an allergic reaction; I am more likely to get sick and let's just say, I have to eat ALOT of yogurt icon_wink.gif .

    I wish you the best. I have created a site for peanut, tree-nut and soy-allergy, so please feel free to visit and get more info. www.mayashappyplace.com
    JulsVerna
    Sat Dec 11, 2010 4:18 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Oh do I ever understand the frustration of trying to find soy-free foods! I was there myself thinking I had allergies to soy, seafood and peanuts (turns out I'm not allergic to those things now...whether a miracle or a mis-diagnosis, I'll never know), and I was in shock about how hard it was to find soy-free foods. Since then, I have begun to compile information about soy-free foods (soy is still something I try to avoid because it makes me feel awful), and (a few weeks ago) began to put together a blog with recipes that are in some way allergy friendly (especially soy-free). Maybe it can be of help to you or someone else reading your post? I sure hope so. icon_smile.gif I am constantly looking for new recipes and information, too, so feel free to share! Thank you! My blog is http://YourNotSoProfessionalPersonalChef.blogspot.com
    Oh, and there is also a list of soy-free foods and alternative names for soy on there as well. I know it is frustrating to find what you're looking for and to constantly check labels, and hopefully one day companies will wake up and make things a little easier on the allergy sufferers, but until then, we do what we do. icon_smile.gif Good luck to you and keep your chin up!
    UmmBinat
    Sun Dec 26, 2010 9:56 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    We are allergic to soy so I can relate we eat absolutely no soy. Hellman olive oil mayonnaise (not light version) is soy free.

    Someone said that vegetable oil should be fine but it usually contains soy! At least here.

    Guar gum is from soy??? That is news to me. I will quit buying it. Can this be verified?

    Most of my recipes are soy free icon_smile.gif
    JulsVerna
    Mon Dec 27, 2010 11:54 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Guar gum is made from a legume that is in the same family as soy, so the possibility of a reaction is there. I would say that it would be a good thing to avoid, just in case, but you could always talk to the doctor about it. Any of the alternative names I've listed, I got from a allergy site or from those who have soy allergies. If you want to try certain foods with guar gum or other additives that just might contain soy, be my guest, but I wouldn't recommend it if your allergies are severe without talking to a doctor first. Just my two cents. icon_smile.gif
    UmmBinat
    Mon Dec 27, 2010 5:59 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Thank you. So I wonder what I should use as we do not use xanthan gum because of it's closeness to corn!!!
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