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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Kitchen Gadgets & Appliances / PRESSURE COOKER Thread!!
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    PRESSURE COOKER Thread!!

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    **Tinkerbell**
    Thu Mar 25, 2010 8:51 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Hi, Kitty! wave.gif
    I LOVE your bunny cat icon! icon_biggrin.gif

    I'm flabbergasted. Roasts from frozen meat??!! omg. I had no idea that was even possible. Wow!

    *Tink
    Marni1
    Fri Jul 02, 2010 5:28 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    I just purchased Wolfgang Puck's 5qt electric pressure cooker from HSN. I love it! I am mainly cooking rice and beans in it for loafs and burgers....so easy and fast. Does anyone have a tried and true recipe for pressure cooking stuffed cabbage? How about stuffed green peppers? Could I just use tomato sauce as a base or should I add other liquids? Thanks!
    Dee514
    Sat Jul 03, 2010 11:57 am
    Forum Host
    I don't know if there is a difference in cooking with an electric pressure cooker as opposed to the stove top type. That said, here is the method I use for cooking stuffed cabbage in my stove top pressure cooker.

    I don't have my mother-in-law's golombki recipe (ingredients or amounts written down) icon_redface.gif
    Use your favorite stuffed cabbage recipe for preparing the cabbage, mixing the filling, and for stuffing the rolls.

    How to Pressure Cook the Golombki:

    Before loading the golombki in the pressure cooker, melt a small amount of bacon grease in the bottom of the pan (optional). Then place enough tomato sauce in the pan to just cover the bottom. Place a small rack in the pan to keep the golombki off the bottom. Place the first layer in the pan and add a bit more sauce to cover them. Continue layering the golombki and sauce in the pan until they reach about 2/3s to 3/4s of the way up the cooker. Add the remaining tomato sauce. Close and lock the pressure cooker and bring it up to heat and cook the golombki for 20 minutes (at 10 pounds of pressure). Remove cooker from heat and let the cooker cool until the pressure has dissipated (about 5 minutes) and the top can be opened. Serve.


    If you need a complete recipe, I did find this hand written one in one of my pressure cooker books (no, its not my m-i-l recipe).

    Pressure Cooker Stuffed Cabbage Rolls

    1 medium head of cabbage
    2 lb lean ground beef (or 2 lb "meat loaf mix" beef, pork, veal)
    1 chopped yellow onion
    1 whole egg
    1 cup cooked long grain rice
    1 teaspoon dried basil
    1 Tablespoon Seasoning mix (1 part garlic powder, 1 part onion powder, ½ part black ground pepper. Mix together well before adding to recipe.)
    2 15 oz cans tomato sauce
    1/4 cup brown sugar
    6 slices uncooked bacon

    Remove core from cabbage, and in boiling water, steam it (core side down) for about 8-10 minutes to loosen leaves.
    Remove cabbage from pot, and remove as many leaves as possible (place them in a bowl of cold water to cool them and make handling easier. Return the head to pot and repeat the process until you have removed enough leaves .
    Meanwhile, mix beef, rice, and onions.
    Slightly beat egg in a small bowl or measuring cup. Add spices, mix well, then add to beef.
    Rinse cabbage under cold running water to cool.
    Gently pull outer leaves.
    Put about 1 tablespoon of beef-rice mixture on each cabbage leaf and roll, starting from one end and tucking in as you roll.
    Place a rack in pressure cooker.
    Take about ½ of one can of sauce and pour on bottom of cooker.
    Layer cabbage rolls in a single layer.
    Put 2 slices of bacon on top of cabbage rolls.
    Sprinkle 1-2 tablespoons of brown sugar on bacon.
    Add more sauce.
    Repeat layering of sauce, cabbage rolls, brown sugar, and bacon until rolls are finished or until pressure cooker is 2/3 full, ending with tomato sauce and some sliced cabbage.
    Pressure cook for 15 minutes with regulator rocking gently.
    Cool down at once.

    You can also cook these on top of the stove in a large pot. Simmer them slowly for about 2 to 2-½ hours or until done.
    OR you can put them into a 350° oven for about 2 to 2-½ hours, cover tightly with foil to prevent drying out.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    As for stuffed peppers, here are several recipes:

    STUFFED GREEN PEPPERS

    3 c. cooked white rice
    8 med. green peppers
    1 1/2 lb. hamburger
    1 1/2 tsp. salt
    1/4 tsp. pepper
    2 eggs
    1 lg. onion, chopped
    2 (10 3/4 oz.) cans tomato soup
    1 1/2 c. water

    Remove seeds and wash peppers. Mix hamburger, rice, salt, pepper, egg, onion, and 2/3 cup tomato soup. Stuff peppers lightly and place on rack in pressure cooker. Top each pepper with 1 tablespoon soup. Mix remaining soup and water, pour into cooker. Cover, set control at 10 and cook 15 minutes after control jiggles. Cool before opening.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Stuffed Green Peppers Recipe

    4 green peppers
    3/4 lb. ground beef
    1/2 cup cooked rice
    1 small egg
    1/4 cup water
    1 tablespoon minced onion
    1 teaspoon salt
    1/4 teaspoon pepper
    1 cup tomato soup

    Wash and clean peppers.
    Combine remaining ingredients except tomato soup and mix thoroughly.
    Fill pepper shells lightly with meat mixture.
    Place on rack in cooker; add soup.
    Pressure cook at 15 lbs.pressure for 10 minutes.
    Reduce pressure.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    STUFFED PEPPERS

    4 bell peppers
    3/4 c. ground beef
    1/3 c. rice (cooked)
    1 tsp. salt
    Pepper (dash)
    1 egg
    1/4 c. milk
    1/3 c. chopped onion
    1 (10 oz.) can tomato soup
    3/4 c. water

    Remove seeds and wash peppers. Parboil 3 minutes. Combine rice, ground beef, egg, milk and onion. Stuff peppers lightly and place in pressure cooker on rack. Add tomato soup and water mixing well. Pour over peppers.
    Set control at 10 (pounds of pressure). Cook 15 minutes after control jiggles. Reduce heat normally for 5 minutes. Remove from heat, and quick cool (place cooker under cold running water to bring down pressure), when pressure has been released, open cooker and serve.
    Marni1
    Mon Jul 05, 2010 9:27 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Thank you Dee,
    These stuffed cabbage and stuffed green pepper recipes are just what I wanted. I grew up in a Polish/Irish neighborhood in Michigan. My best friends Polish Mother prepared the most wonderful meals..... My parent always knew where to find me. I am so anxious to try these recipes in my new electric pressure cooker.
    I followed your profile. You should write your own cookbook.
    I would be first in line to buy one!
    M
    Brian Holley
    Fri Jul 30, 2010 7:04 am
    Food.com Groupie
    A Big Hi to Everyone. I have used pressure cookers now for about 50 years. They are wonderfu,used with a little bit of common sense there is not much that you can't do in a fraction of the time taken with pots and pans. I have few pressure cookers, Khun Rikon 2.7 ltr, a 4 ltr Magefesa with a 6 ltr of the same make. Just a few weeks ago I bought a CHINESE cooker for 10 euros (new) the lady I bought it from could not read chinese. This is a 8ltr cooker with 4 safety valves, it is better in my estimation than the Khun Rikon.

    I use a pressure cooker on a daily basis and wouldn't be without one (or two). This week I have family from the U.K. staying with us in Spain. I cooked nine curry dishes for my son today, the only thing that I cooked in the conventional way was the rice.
    aliceindallas
    Sat Jul 31, 2010 12:05 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    I have been looking everywhere for a conversion chart which would compare the time required to cook specific foods in a crock pot vs. an electric pressure cooker. Like, with pot roast, you can be pretty sure it will be falling off the bone after 10 hours in the crock pot slow cooker. But how long does it take to get the same effect (off the bone) in a pressure cooker at high pressure? 40 minutes? 60? 2 hours?

    I also want to note that I always pre-brown all meats that go into either one of these cooking pots. And I sauté all veggies, onions, potatoes, etc with both. Mainly do this for the flavor and to seal in juices.

    But does anyone know of such a conversion or equivalency chart? I would be ever so thrilled to have one. Thanks
    Nana Chickens
    Wed Aug 18, 2010 2:36 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    With summer slowing down, hopefully, I thought I'd bump this up to the top.

    I have a Presto 23 quart pressure cooker/canner. Every summer I make jams, jellies and preserves. However, that's it! Sad, so very sad I never researched the joys or pressure cookling until I read this entire thread last week. Well, that's not entirely true. Last year I did cook some of our older chickens and made a great chicken and dumplings. The broth was probabley the best broth I ever made. OMG, I am so excited to start some OAMC.

    Hublet and I are retired and work a small "Hobby" "Homestead" farm. We raise close to 90% of what we consume, foodwise. Including, raising our own, beef, pork, lamb and poultry. We have a pond stocked with catfish, but it's rare that we fish and we have goats, but we don't eat them either. Our goats are too much like our children and close friends.

    Our youngest son, his wife and 3 grands live out here in the same town and come for dinner almost every Sunday. We also get out of town company. The pressure cooker will be a huge time saver for me. That along with my slow cooker and my FoodSaver, I'll have it "made in the shade".

    I hope to make, pot roasts, goulashes, lamb stews, chicken and hams, beef and pork stocks and even cheesecakes.

    Thank you so much for having this thread and giving me so much inspiration.

    Leslie
    **Tinkerbell**
    Fri Aug 20, 2010 8:09 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Hi, Leslie! wave.gif

    I know, I love this thread too! I have yet to use my pressure canner for cooking, but I am looking forward to it.

    I think your farm sounds so admirable. I'd love to live some place just like you describe, but I'm allergic to animals and I have about the deadliest plant thumb in the west! icon_wink.gif

    DH keeps saying he'll dig me a vegetable garden, plant it & tend it. But, I have a sneaking suspicion that it'll just end up neglected. LOL

    *Tink
    Nana Chickens
    Sun Sep 12, 2010 12:43 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Hey Tink, today is the day I do some rump roasts in the pressure cooker. Say a prayer for me they turn out. I'm roasting some beef shank pieces to make a gravy. Will serve with mashed potatoes and candied carrots.
    **Tinkerbell**
    Sun Sep 12, 2010 4:35 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Ooooh! I know they'll turn out for you! The only thing I don't know is what time I should show up for dinner! Yum! icon_biggrin.gif

    Sounds like a great meal, Nana. I can't wait to here all about your experience.

    *Tink
    hip pressure cooking
    Mon Sep 13, 2010 6:26 am
    Semi-Experienced "Sous Chef" Poster
    Hi Alice,

    I can do the conversion for you. I wrote a little chart for an article on kitchn.com that compared a recipe on the stove-top, pressure cooker and slow cooker:

    http://www.thekitchn.com/thekitchn/guest-post/scarycool-pressure-cooking-faster-healthier-with-less-heat-guest-post-from-laura-of--123848

    The easiest way to calculate this is instead of calculating backwards from the slow cooker recipe - which usually has alot of leeway with timing - calculate it backwards from the stove-top oven version.

    Let me know what recipes you are looking for and I can give you the timing. I, for one, have had a roast fall off the bone in just 30 minutes under pressure! The nice thing, of course, is that you can let out the pressure, open the pot and check. If it is still not tender enough, close the top again, bring it up to pressure and cook it s'more!


    Best of luck!

    Laura

    LINK REMOVED BY MODERATOR



    aliceindallas wrote:
    I have been looking everywhere for a conversion chart which would compare the time required to cook specific foods in a crock pot vs. an electric pressure cooker. Like, with pot roast, you can be pretty sure it will be falling off the bone after 10 hours in the crock pot slow cooker. But how long does it take to get the same effect (off the bone) in a pressure cooker at high pressure? 40 minutes? 60? 2 hours?

    I also want to note that I always pre-brown all meats that go into either one of these cooking pots. And I sauté all veggies, onions, potatoes, etc with both. Mainly do this for the flavor and to seal in juices.

    But does anyone know of such a conversion or equivalency chart? I would be ever so thrilled to have one. Thanks
    **Tinkerbell**
    Mon Sep 13, 2010 11:34 am
    Food.com Groupie
    pazzaglia wrote:
    Hi Alice,

    I can do the conversion for you. I wrote a little chart for an article on kitchn.com that compared a recipe on the stove-top, pressure cooker and slow cooker:

    http://www.thekitchn.com/thekitchn/guest-post/scarycool-pressure-cooking-faster-healthier-with-less-heat-guest-post-from-laura-of--123848

    The easiest way to calculate this is instead of calculating backwards from the slow cooker recipe - which usually has alot of leeway with timing - calculate it backwards from the stove-top oven version.

    Let me know what recipes you are looking for and I can give you the timing. I, for one, have had a roast fall off the bone in just 30 minutes under pressure! The nice thing, of course, is that you can let out the pressure, open the pot and check. If it is still not tender enough, close the top again, bring it up to pressure and cook it s'more!


    Best of luck!

    Laura



    Hi, Laura! Welcome to the Gadgets forum!
    Thanks for all this great information on conversions. I read & bookmarked both your article & your blog for future reference. icon_biggrin.gif
    *Tink
    aliceindallas
    Tue Sep 14, 2010 1:31 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Quote:


    Laura, thanks so much for your response - and the article is wonderful! I have converted it to a pdf and have it posted in my kitchen for handy reference. When I asked my question about getting roasts to the falling-off-the-bone stage, I never anticipated that I'd get such complete information as I found in your article. I am cooking so many more things in this wonderful gadget than I ever dreamed - and after reading your article, I realize that the fun has just begun.

    One question .... in your opinion, what factors affect the speed of cooking, as when a roast becomes fork-tender in 30 minutes vs. say, an hour or whatever? Is it the amount of liquid you use? Or is it just the cut of meat? Just curious. Cheers! Alice
    hip pressure cooking
    Tue Sep 14, 2010 1:49 am
    Semi-Experienced "Sous Chef" Poster
    aliceindallas wrote:

    One question .... in your opinion, what factors affect the speed of cooking, as when a roast becomes fork-tender in 30 minutes vs. say, an hour or whatever? Is it the amount of liquid you use? Or is it just the cut of meat? Just curious. Cheers! Alice


    Hi Alice, the pressure cooker cooks faster because it reaches a higher "wet heat" temperature than can be achieved in a comparable stew pots or slow cookers even hotter than the "dry heat" in an oven. Have you ever noticed how, on a humid day it feels hotter than it actually is? Also, the pressure injects the vaporized liquid right in the roast instead of sitting around at the bottom of a pan. Think of all that vapor in a sealed pan with nowhere to go but around. The cut of meat only matters in the sense of how thick and stringy (muscley) it is and how much cartilage might be running through it.

    BTW, everyone I popped over to the suggestion forum and suggested we get our own forum. Isn't it difficult to discuss things with 30+ page thread? I mean, slow-cookers have their own forum.. why not us?!?!

    Laura -- pressuring the 'lot
    LINK REMOVED BY MODERATOR

    P.S. Starting in October or November I will be doing "meat month" on my blog... a whole month of roasts, stews and meat sauces!
    aliceindallas
    Tue Sep 14, 2010 3:26 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Laura wrote: " ..... the pressure cooker cooks faster because it reaches a higher 'wet heat' temperature than can be achieved in a comparable stew pots or slow cookers .... ever noticed how, on a humid day it feels hotter than it actually is? ...."

    Thanks! This makes perfect sense, Laura. So I shouldn't cut the liquid to nil. And BTW, I really do get the humidity thing - Dallas right now feels like 107 when it's a cool 94. I am going to start watching your site and blog. Such good knowledge - and yep, I'd go for a shorter thread of our own. Cheers!
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