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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Cooking on a Budget: OAMC, Make Ahead, Freezing & More / Could you spend only $100/month at the grocery store?
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    Could you spend only $100/month at the grocery store?

    Go to page 1, 2, 3 ... 41, 42, 43  Next Page >>
    MommyMakes
    Sun Jan 01, 2006 8:32 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    icon_eek.gif Could you do it? Only $100?? icon_eek.gif

    What would you buy?
    What would you make?


    apple.gifbanana.gifburger.gifcake.gifcarrot.gifcherry.gifsausage.gifdrumstick.gifgrapes.gificecream.giflemon.gifpeach.gifpineapple.gifpizza.gifpretzel.giftomato.gifm-m.gifdonut.gifchilipepper.gifcookie.gif
    *Parsley*
    Sun Jan 01, 2006 10:58 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    $100 a month? Me? No way. I've got 4 boys (2 of which are in diapers and 1 in Pull-Ups) and a husband. I spend over $150 a WEEK!
    Susie D
    Sun Jan 01, 2006 10:59 pm
    Forum Host
    gulp. icon_eek.gif

    How many meals per week? How many people per meal?
    Lots of us have had to be on a tight budget before and it is doable.

    I would suggest looking at the grocery sales and starting there. What is on sale that can be utilized for this week and the next month? Today for example, our store has pork chops for $.99 per pound. A package of 6 chops averaged $2.25. Bone in fryer breast is $.79 per pound. I bought extra to put in the freezer of both.

    A menu plan is a must.
    Implement some vegetarian meals into your meal plan.

    Use coupons, preferably at a store that doubles and triples the value. Only use them on items that give a true value or if you can combine them with a sale. Today catsup was on sale for $.78 I used a triple coupon and paid 3 cents. I view it as a game and play at it even when I don't need to budget. icon_lol.gif I like saving money.

    Homemade is usually cheaper. Make your own biscuit, pancake mix, taco seasoning, etc. (Unless you have that coupon icon_lol.gif )
    Chef #208121
    Sun Jan 01, 2006 11:13 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    It's not impossible. Why? because as an experiment we tried it. The average person in PA at the time [single adult] got around 109 dollars in foodstamps. So a bunch of us gave it a shot to see if it was workable. No one tried a family on it. We were all single adult students at the time. Since it was "foodstamps" we followed the guide, nothing but food could be bought and prepared 'hot' foods were out such as the broasted chicken in the deli department.

    What did we buy? A lot of specials, no premade mixes or the like, no prepared foods such as frozen hashbrowns or pizzas, no frozen dinners unless they were on special. Everything had to be scratch to make it and everything had to be in season. Not essential food such as ice cream was off the list or at the end of the month IF you had money left unless you had an ice cream freezer.

    Note we got around the buying lunch because we caculated the amount of money we would spend if we got cash assistance. For my home county? That was a grand 98.00 a month. So you can bet I didn't hit the resturants after I "paid" my bills. [we made up mock living expenses within our budget]
    Bergy
    Mon Jan 02, 2006 2:15 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Susie D wrote:
    gulp. icon_eek.gif

    How many meals per week? How many people per meal?
    Lots of us have had to be on a tight budget before and it is doable.

    I would suggest looking at the grocery sales and starting there. What is on sale that can be utilized for this week and the next month? Today for example, our store has pork chops for $.99 per pound. A package of 6 chops averaged $2.25. Bone in fryer breast is $.79 per pound. I bought extra to put in the freezer of both.

    A menu plan is a must.
    Implement some vegetarian meals into your meal plan.

    Use coupons, preferably at a store that doubles and triples the value. Only use them on items that give a true value or if you can combine them with a sale. Today catsup was on sale for $.78 I used a triple coupon and paid 3 cents. I view it as a game and play at it even when I don't need to budget. icon_lol.gif I like saving money.

    Homemade is usually cheaper. Make your own biscuit, pancake mix, taco seasoning, etc. (Unless you have that coupon icon_lol.gif )


    Good advice - been there - done that!
    Bergy
    Mon Jan 02, 2006 2:18 am
    Food.com Groupie
    philocrates wrote:
    It's not impossible. Why? because as an experiment we tried it. The average person in PA at the time [single adult] got around 109 dollars in foodstamps. So a bunch of us gave it a shot to see if it was workable. No one tried a family on it. We were all single adult students at the time. Since it was "foodstamps" we followed the guide, nothing but food could be bought and prepared 'hot' foods were out such as the broasted chicken in the deli department.

    What did we buy? A lot of specials, no premade mixes or the like, no prepared foods such as frozen hashbrowns or pizzas, no frozen dinners unless they were on special. Everything had to be scratch to make it and everything had to be in season. Not essential food such as ice cream was off the list or at the end of the month IF you had money left unless you had an ice cream freezer.

    Note we got around the buying lunch because we caculated the amount of money we would spend if we got cash assistance. For my home county? That was a grand 98.00 a month. So you can bet I didn't hit the resturants after I "paid" my bills. [we made up mock living expenses within our budget]


    You got that right - make everything from scratch! Read the weekly specials. we have 3 super markets in my small city and I sit down every Sat and see what is on special. I don't by any specials that are not what I use or need. Look at fresh veggies specials
    lauralie41
    Mon Jan 02, 2006 2:28 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Coupons are a big help! A lot of stores now double the value of the coupon and every once in awhile they do triple coupons. A friend had also told me to keep up with rebate offers as the money from those add up too.
    Susie D
    Mon Jan 02, 2006 6:53 am
    Forum Host
    Breakfast for dinner is filling and economical. Strata or a frittata can help you use up bits & pieces.

    Save the chicken bones to make stock. It can be utilized in so many ways.
    Lvs2Cook
    Mon Jan 02, 2006 9:08 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I am active on a frugal site where many spend $100/month *or less* routinely. Some of those ladies are just amazing!

    I can't do it...I've tried icon_confused.gif I'm lucky if I spend *only* $100 per week.

    I've often wondered how some of the posters here grocery shop ~ especially the ones who review alot of recipes. Do they go to the store often, do they menu plan, etc.
    Bergy
    Mon Jan 02, 2006 9:58 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Lvs2Cook wrote:
    I am active on a frugal site where many spend $100/month *or less* routinely. Some of those ladies are just amazing!

    I can't do it...I've tried icon_confused.gif I'm lucky if I spend *only* $100 per week.

    I've often wondered how some of the posters here grocery shop ~ especially the ones who review alot of recipes. Do they go to the store often, do they menu plan, etc.


    Can you post some examples of what the "Under $100." do to keep to their budget?

    I plan my entertaining & weekly menus around the weekly specials.
    Bergy
    Mon Jan 02, 2006 10:03 am
    Food.com Groupie
    In order to stick to a tight budgetyou mustplan your meals and you have to allow time to cook from scratch
    This is really not difficult once you get in the habit of doing it.
    Cook large amounts, use your freezer. If you do not have a freezer make things like nourishing soups and alternate it for lunch & dinner.
    Like Susie suggested make breakfast meals for dinner
    Elisa72
    Mon Jan 02, 2006 11:59 am
    Food.com Groupie
    When I was feeding myself and 3 children I managed to keep my grocery bill down to about $300 a month. I shopped according to what was on sale and used coupons, as others have mentioned.

    My primary way of keeping the bill down, however, was buying very little meat, on sale or not. We got most of our protein from beans. While I tried many different types of beans and ways of cooking them, my kids (who were grade school age at the time) preferred pinto beans.

    I would cook a big pot of pinto beans with water and nothing else, then add salt when they were done. The first meal was usually what we called "bean soup," the cooked beans with crumbled cotija or grated cheddar on top (and chopped cilantro and sliced pickled jalapenos for me!) served with hot corn tortillas.

    Then I would "fry" the leftover beans (I never used oil, just enough water to obtain the texture I wanted) making it rather thin and we'd have "refried bean soup," the same as above only with refried beans. Funny how squishing the beans totally changes the flavor!

    Then the refried beans (cooked until they were thick) would become bean and cheese burritos, or a side dish to something else. We could eat for a week on a dollar's worth of beans!
    anne in apex
    Mon Jan 02, 2006 12:41 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    On a normal basis, I probably spend $30/week. There are just two of us, and we're not huge eaters. I buy meat in bulk or on sale, and freeze it. We eat a fair bit of Asian food, and we have a nice Asian market where the produce is usually about 30-50% cheaper than in the grocery store. My favorite food group is pasta, which also happens to be cheap. icon_smile.gif I watch for marked down meat at the grocery (we call it the rotten meat section icon_lol.gif ). I can make a stir fry or stroganoff for two with $1.50 worth of marked down top round. I've learned to make the meat more of a condiment than the main ingredient in some dishes.

    I do make a visit to the warehouse club about once every three months, but that is mostly for snack foods, olive oil, cheese in bulk, and beer.
    Bergy
    Mon Jan 02, 2006 12:49 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Elisa72 wrote:
    When I was feeding myself and 3 children I managed to keep my grocery bill down to about $300 a month. I shopped according to what was on sale and used coupons, as others have mentioned.

    My primary way of keeping the bill down, however, was buying very little meat, on sale or not. We got most of our protein from beans. While I tried many different types of beans and ways of cooking them, my kids (who were grade school age at the time) preferred pinto beans.

    I would cook a big pot of pinto beans with water and nothing else, then add salt when they were done. The first meal was usually what we called "bean soup," the cooked beans with crumbled cotija or grated cheddar on top (and chopped cilantro and sliced pickled jalapenos for me!) served with hot corn tortillas.

    Then I would "fry" the leftover beans (I never used oil, just enough water to obtain the texture I wanted) making it rather thin and we'd have "refried bean soup," the same as above only with refried beans. Funny how squishing the beans totally changes the flavor!

    Then the refried beans (cooked until they were thick) would become bean and cheese burritos, or a side dish to something else. We could eat for a week on a dollar's worth of beans!


    Sounds wonderful to me and you are right you are getting the protein - excellent tips
    Bergy
    Mon Jan 02, 2006 12:52 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    anne in apex wrote:
    On a normal basis, I probably spend $30/week. There are just two of us, and we're not huge eaters. I buy meat in bulk or on sale, and freeze it. We eat a fair bit of Asian food, and we have a nice Asian market where the produce is usually about 30-50% cheaper than in the grocery store. My favorite food group is pasta, which also happens to be cheap. icon_smile.gif I watch for marked down meat at the grocery (we call it the rotten meat section icon_lol.gif ). I can make a stir fry or stroganoff for two with $1.50 worth of marked down top round. I've learned to make the meat more of a condiment than the main ingredient in some dishes.

    I do make a visit to the warehouse club about once every three months, but that is mostly for snack foods, olive oil, cheese in bulk, and beer.




    Usually on Monday AM or late Saturday the meat counter in safeway has great markdowns-into the freezer they go

    I agree Stirfrys or Asian recipes are great because you can use so little meat and still have a very tasty meal!
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