Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Canning, Preserving and Dehydrating / Canning String Beans without a pressure cooker
    Lost? Site Map

    Canning String Beans without a pressure cooker

    Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next Page >>
    Crystal #2
    Sun Jul 17, 2005 6:03 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    I was wondering if there was a recipe any of you had for canning string beans without a pressure cooker. I looked this up on dogpile, and all I could find were recipes involving the cookers. Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks so much! icon_biggrin.gif
    Jellyqueen
    Sun Jul 17, 2005 7:53 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Crystal #2 wrote:
    I was wondering if there was a recipe any of you had for canning string beans without a pressure cooker. I looked this up on dogpile, and all I could find were recipes involving the cookers. Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks so much! icon_biggrin.gif


    I have never seen a recipe where these were canned by any other process either. I am thinking that maybe it would not be safe to can them any other way. Some people do freeze them, but I have tried that a couple of times, and I just do not care for them out of the freezer.

    I will look around and see if I can find anything.

    JQ icon_smile.gif
    UnknownChef86
    Mon Jul 18, 2005 2:12 am
    Forum Host
    Not to be a party-pooper (every party has a pooper, that's why you invited me, right?), but if you are canning green beans, you have to use a pressure-cooker!!! Otherwise you might as well form a line to the local hospital. Green beans that are not canned properly (pressure-canned) are extreme harbingers of food-poisoning. I'd advise either freezing them (lesser quality, imo) or learning to pressure cook them. Having canned green beans on your shelf is not worth the cost of your life (if they're canned improperly).

    Sorry to be the bearer of bad tidings. icon_confused.gif
    ~kdp
    Mon Jul 18, 2005 8:40 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I've been reading over my Kerr canning book the past few days.
    I just canned some green beans. I use the pressure canner. quarts=10# pressure for 25 minutes. icon_smile.gif

    It also has directions for water bath canning them.
    It says for string beans: to precook them for 3 minutes, pack into jars then place in boiling water bath for 3 hours.
    One of my cousins cans her green beans using the water bath method as she is afraid of pressure canners (seems one blew up on her mom when she was a kid...) No one has ended up in the hospital from eating at her house...but you need to be careful, whatever method you use.
    icon_smile.gif ~k
    Tara
    Mon Jul 18, 2005 12:15 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I have done them in a water bath but they have vinegar in them for acidity. I will have to get the recipe and that will take me 24 hrs but I will post it for you. They arent strong enough that they are pickled but you should rinse them a couple times before heating them in fresh water to take away the vinegar taste and they are really good. Easy to make too.
    Crystal #2
    Mon Jul 18, 2005 7:29 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Thank you all so much for your replies. Yeah, my grandmother used to can her string beans without a pressure cooker, and hers were always delicious. And no one ever got sick. So I figured it was pretty safe. I will be sure to try what you've posted. Again, thank you! icon_smile.gif
    NoraMarie
    Mon Jul 18, 2005 7:49 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I can mine for 3 hours,1 teaspoon salt in each quart. Hubby says this year we will get the 20 quart pressure cooker [ stainless steel ] as he says we will save time and hydro.I plan on canning all our fruit and vegetables I can to last till June next year. icon_lol.gif
    Tara
    Wed Jul 20, 2005 1:45 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Sorry I didnt make it on yesterday, the green beans to can in a water bath are: 6 qts green beans, 1 cup vinegar, 6 cups water, 2 TBS pickling salt, cut beans in 2-3 inch lengths, mix together with liquid and simmer 20 minutes. Put in pint size jars, seal and process for 20 minutes. I know many people who have eaten things for years without getting sick even like unprocessed spaghetti sauce put you need to be extra careful, it only takes one jar to cause bautolism.
    UnknownChef86
    Wed Jul 20, 2005 4:54 pm
    Forum Host
    kdp wrote:
    I've been reading over my Kerr canning book the past few days.
    I just canned some green beans. I use the pressure canner. quarts=10# pressure for 25 minutes. icon_smile.gif

    It also has directions for water bath canning them.
    It says for string beans: to precook them for 3 minutes, pack into jars then place in boiling water bath for 3 hours.
    One of my cousins cans her green beans using the water bath method as she is afraid of pressure canners (seems one blew up on her mom when she was a kid...) No one has ended up in the hospital from eating at her house...but you need to be careful, whatever method you use.
    icon_smile.gif ~k

    What year is your Kerr canning book? As safety issues have been discovered, the requirements for canning have changed. I canned green beans with my mom when I was growing up (I'm now 40), and as long as I can remember we had to pressure-can them because of the potential for botulism. The older books didn't have that info. I'd advise buying the most recent Ball Blue Book. They keep it up to date according to the latest safety info.

    I also checked a number of state extension service sites, which is the other best place to look for the latest canning information. ALL of them say that green beans MUST BE PRESSURE CANNED. By water bath canning your green beans (or other low-acid foods) you are courting disaster. Call your local state extension service and ask them what they think about water bath canning for green beans. Or Google your state, "green beans" and "extension office" and see what comes up.

    Sorry to be so anal about this, but no amount of ease of canning is worth it to wind up dead. Or worse. Check out this article by the Oregon State University News. Yes, the article is about beets, but it's the same concept.
    NoraMarie
    Wed Jul 20, 2005 7:57 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Hubby bought me a pressure cooker canner today...I just picked out of my garden 12 quarts of yellow beans.Canning tomorrow. Hubby will look after it as I am uneasy about the cooker.
    ~kdp
    Wed Jul 20, 2005 8:13 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    UnknownChef86 wrote:
    kdp wrote:
    I've been reading over my Kerr canning book the past few days.
    I just canned some green beans. I use the pressure canner. quarts=10# pressure for 25 minutes. icon_smile.gif

    It also has directions for water bath canning them.
    It says for string beans: to precook them for 3 minutes, pack into jars then place in boiling water bath for 3 hours.
    One of my cousins cans her green beans using the water bath method as she is afraid of pressure canners (seems one blew up on her mom when she was a kid...) No one has ended up in the hospital from eating at her house...but you need to be careful, whatever method you use.
    icon_smile.gif ~k

    What year is your Kerr canning book? As safety issues have been discovered, the requirements for canning have changed. I canned green beans with my mom when I was growing up (I'm now 40), and as long as I can remember we had to pressure-can them because of the potential for botulism. The older books didn't have that info. I'd advise buying the most recent Ball Blue Book. They keep it up to date according to the latest safety info.

    I also checked a number of state extension service sites, which is the other best place to look for the latest canning information. ALL of them say that green beans MUST BE PRESSURE CANNED. By water bath canning your green beans (or other low-acid foods) you are courting disaster. Call your local state extension service and ask them what they think about water bath canning for green beans. Or Google your state, "green beans" and "extension office" and see what comes up.

    Sorry to be so anal about this, but no amount of ease of canning is worth it to wind up dead. Or worse. Check out this article by the Oregon State University News. Yes, the article is about beets, but it's the same concept.

    I was only trying to be helpful and let someone know that they can be canned by using the water bath method and safely. I know several people that can their own foods and every one of them uses a different "book" or method.
    Personally, I am fortunate enough to have a pressure canner and a water bath canner.
    Also, the "extension office" where I live is about as useful as if I were to go outside and ask one of our dogs how to do something that pertained to canning... icon_confused.gif
    Don't worry about being anal...we all are at times. And I do understand where you are coming from.
    icon_smile.gif ~k
    ~kdp
    Wed Jul 20, 2005 8:15 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Oh, the date on my canning book is 2000 and something...all I can make out is the 20...seems like it has something on it that resembles blackberries. icon_wink.gif
    Jellyqueen
    Thu Jul 21, 2005 6:24 am
    Food.com Groupie
    kdp wrote:
    Oh, the date on my canning book is 2000 and something...all I can make out is the 20...seems like it has something on it that resembles blackberries. icon_wink.gif


    Hum.........wonder how that stain got there!!!!!

    The vinegar in the beans may be the key to water bath canning. I have never put vinegar in my beans before.

    JQ icon_smile.gif
    ~kdp
    Thu Jul 21, 2005 8:47 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Jellyqueen wrote:
    kdp wrote:
    Oh, the date on my canning book is 2000 and something...all I can make out is the 20...seems like it has something on it that resembles blackberries. icon_wink.gif


    Hum.........wonder how that stain got there!!!!!

    The vinegar in the beans may be the key to water bath canning. I have never put vinegar in my beans before.

    JQ icon_smile.gif

    I don't have a clue! icon_lol.gif icon_wink.gif
    As far as the vinegar, I don't know. Next time I talk to my cousin, I'll ask her if she uses vinegar. Although the books that I have don't mention using vinegar. Confusing, huh?
    Chef #231377
    Mon Jul 25, 2005 8:44 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    i have canned string beans whithout a presure canner.I wash beans well and pack not cooked in jar 1tsp coarse salt if desired fill jar whith hot water put in large pot of boiling water water should be above lid boil for about twenty five minutes then remove lid should pop. I always use small jars as the large ones dont fit in pot.a other way is to do same and put in oven for 45 minutes or until beans boil.Make sure not to put beans above line or neck of jar as they need room to boil. I hope this will help
    Chef 231377
    Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next Page >> E-mail me when someone replies to this
    Add this to My Favorite Topics
    Alert us of inappropriate posts

    Free Weekly Newsletter

    Get the latest recipes and tips delivered right to your inbox.

    Your e-mail is safe. Privacy Policy
    Advertisement

    Ideas from Food.com

    Powered by phpBB 2.0.1 © 2002 phpBB Group

    Over 475,000 Recipes

    Food.com Network of Sites