Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Breads & Baking / Crackers at Mount Vernon..
    Lost? Site Map

    Crackers at Mount Vernon..

    BigFatMomma
    Sun May 29, 2005 1:31 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Okay, I just realized that sounds kind of weird.

    Anyway, at the Mount Vernon Inn, up here in VA, there are these crackers they serve with the bread. They are thick, and heavy, but not sweet. Brown toasty colored, but not toast. They are kind of like a cross between a crispbread and a graham cracker as far as texture goes, but without all the husks and bits in them. They just taste like bread. I don't know what they're called, but they are pretty good, and I'm wondering if any of you have a recipe for something like this. It might be a traditional American recipe, since it's served at Mount Vernon.

    TIA
    Impera_Magna
    Sun May 29, 2005 2:21 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    You may be referring to beaten biscuits, a traditional Southern biscuit that dates back to the 1800s. Whereas most biscuits are soft and light, beaten biscuits are hard and crisp.

    The classic texture is obtained by beating the dough for 30 to 45 minutes until it becomes blistered, elastic and smooth. The beating may be done with a mallet, rolling pin, the flat side of a cleaver . . . any heavy object that will pound the dough into submission.

    One can also use an old-fashioned beaten-biscuit machine, a contraption with wooden or metal rollers reminiscent of an old-time clothes wringer. The dough is passed through the rollers, which are operated by a hand crank. This method takes no less time but saves on the wear and tear of the baker. After the dough is beaten, it is rolled out, cut into small circles and pricked with the tines of a fork before being baked.
    =====
    Beaten Biscuits

    4 cups all-purpose flour
    1 teaspoon salt
    1/4 cup lard or solid vegetable shortening
    2 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature
    1 cup cold milk

    In a large bowl, combine flour and salt, tossing with a fork to blend. Add lard or shortening and butter; work fat into flour mixture with your fingertips until mixture resembles coarse meal.
    Make a well in center of mixture and add milk; stir to combine well.

    Turn out onto a lightly floured work surface and knead 3 or 4 times until dough holds together. Preheat oven to 400F . Grease baking sheet; set aside.

    Pat out dough about 1 inch thick and begin to beat it, using a wooden mallet or other implement, with a gentle, rhythmic motion. When entire surface has been well beaten, fold dough in half and repeat the process. Continue to beat and fold until dough is well blistered (20 to 30 minutes).

    Roll out dough 1/2 inch thick and cut into rounds with a floured 2-inch biscuit cutter; reroll and cut scraps. Repeat until all dough has been used. Prick top of each biscuit 3 times with a fork.

    Place biscuits on greased baking sheet; bake in preheated oven until golden brown (20 to 25 minutes).

    Serve hot. Makes about 24 biscuits.

    From: www.chefrick.com/html/beatenbiscuits.html
    =====

    Beaten Biscuits

    2 cups all-purpose flour
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    1/4 teaspoon baking powder
    1 1/2 tablespoons white sugar
    1/4 cup lard, chilled and cut into small pieces
    1/3 cup light cream
    2 tablespoons cold water (optional)

    Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F (230 degrees C).

    Sift flour, salt, baking powder, and sugar together. Use a fork to "cut" the lard into the flour until it looks like coarse meal. Using a standing mixer, or a wooden spoon, mix the dough as you slowly add the cream. Mix well to form the dough into a ball, adding water if needed.

    Place the dough onto a tabletop, and knead slightly. With a mallet or a one-piece rolling pin, beat the dough a few times to form it into a rough rectangle. Fold the dough over, and then beat it out again. Repeat this process until the dough becomes white and blisters form on the surface, about 15 minutes.

    Roll out the dough to about 1/4 inch thick. Cut into 2 inch rounds, and prick the top a few times with the tines of a fork. Place on greased baking sheets.

    Bake for 15 minutes, or until golden.

    From: http://bread.allrecipes.com/az/BeatenBiscuits.asp
    =====


    Beaten Biscuits
    Southerners describe beaten biscuits as a cross between a soda cracker and a baking powder biscuit. To achieve the right texture and lightness, the dough had to be beaten hard (usually with a mallet) for at least 30 minutes. The purpose of the beating was to incorporate air into the mixture (this was a time in history before the invention of baking powder). They were a very heavy biscuit, not like our present day baking powder biscuits.

    Beaten Biscuits History
    Beaten biscuits originated in Virginia and traveled across the mountains to Kentucky and then north to Maryland. Chuck wagon cooks also made them, recruiting a gullible new cowhand for help. They were considered the pride of the South, and in earlier days no Southern hostess would fail to offer these at any and all times of the day. They are one of the delicious hot breads that have made Southern cooks famous. They were basically considered an upper-class status symbol dish that depended on a lot of labor. Making the beaten biscuits was the daily duty of the plantation cook.

    2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
    1/2 tsp. salt
    1 tsp. sugar
    1/3 tsp. baking powder
    1/3 cup shortening
    1/3 to 1/2 cup milk

    Preheat oven to 375 F (190C). Lightly grease a large baking sheet.

    Sift together dry ingredients. Cut in the shortening (consistency should look like coarse meal). Stir in 1/3 cup milk until dough holds together* (see note below). You may have to add a little more milk if the dough is too dry or crumbly.

    Turn onto floured board and knead. Beat with a rolling pin until dough blisters, 100 whacks or more, folding edges in toward the center and turning after every few whacks. Roll dough to 3/8-inch thickness and cut with small round cutter. Using a fork, prick tops two or three times.

    Arrange on lightly greased baking sheet and bake at 375F (190C) for 30 minutes, or until light golden.

    Makes about 30-35 "beaten biscuits".

    *Note: The mixing of the dry ingredients, and adding the shortening and milk to dry ingredients can be done in a food processor if desired. Before turning dough out onto a floured board to knead and "beat", you may briefly knead dough in the food processor.

    From: http://www.dianasdesserts.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/recipes.recipeListing/filter/dianas/recipeID/1248/Recipe.cfm
    =====

    Hope this helps. Good luck!
    Dienia B.
    Sun May 29, 2005 2:33 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    wow that was great im glad you post its amazing what you can do when you know how to run a computer lol dee
    Impera_Magna
    Sun May 29, 2005 2:48 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    dienia bennett wrote:
    wow that was great im glad you post its amazing what you can do when you know how to run a computer lol dee


    Yup, sure is! Of course, knowing what you're looking for sure helps!

    icon_biggrin.gif
    Kymmarie
    Sun May 29, 2005 7:39 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Impera_Magna wrote:
    dienia bennett wrote:
    wow that was great im glad you post its amazing what you can do when you know how to run a computer lol dee


    Yup, sure is! Of course, knowing what you're looking for sure helps!

    icon_biggrin.gif


    But sometimes the journey is even more fun!!! icon_eek.gif icon_cool.gif icon_biggrin.gif
    Impera_Magna
    Sun May 29, 2005 7:45 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Kymmarie wrote:
    Impera_Magna wrote:
    dienia bennett wrote:
    wow that was great im glad you post its amazing what you can do when you know how to run a computer lol dee


    Yup, sure is! Of course, knowing what you're looking for sure helps!

    icon_biggrin.gif


    But sometimes the journey is even more fun!!! icon_eek.gif icon_cool.gif icon_biggrin.gif


    The internet is worse than a set of encyclopedias. You go looking for one thing... and end up spending hours reading about everything under the sun!

    icon_biggrin.gif
    Dienia B.
    Sun May 29, 2005 8:00 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    and some of the side roads are more fun its better than the enc. cause there are more places to see and more people to meet
    Dienia B.
    Sun May 29, 2005 8:01 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    and some of the side roads are more fun its better than the enc. cause there are more places to see and more people to meet and all fat momma wants is a cracker recipe lol
    Kymmarie
    Sun May 29, 2005 8:10 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    dienia bennett wrote:
    and some of the side roads are more fun its better than the enc. cause there are more places to see and more people to meet and all fat momma wants is a cracker recipe lol


    ECHO???

    echo??
    Roxygirl in Colorado
    Sun May 29, 2005 9:06 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Old-Time Beaten Biscuits recipe #107937 are wonderful. I've made them several times in my food processer. They are fabulous!

    Roxygirl in Colo.
    Dienia B.
    Sun May 29, 2005 9:44 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    well im not really computer literate and i get biffs all the time i also need spell check
    Kymmarie
    Sun May 29, 2005 9:55 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    dienia bennett wrote:
    well im not really computer literate and i get biffs all the time i also need spell check


    Not a problem!! icon_biggrin.gif I've sent about 70 emails to the same person before with one click of the mouse. And they think Superman is powerful! icon_razz.gif
    BigFatMomma
    Mon May 30, 2005 12:37 am
    Food.com Groupie
    The beaten biscuits sound good, but I don't know if those are right. These were not airy, but hard and crunchy. Hard to describe...1/8 inch thick, with little tiiiiiny holes, and not round...Light brown, nice hearty flavor. Any more suggestions?

    momma
    Heather Sullivan
    Mon May 30, 2005 3:54 am
    Food.com Groupie
    BigfatMomma wrote:
    The beaten biscuits sound good, but I don't know if those are right. These were not airy, but hard and crunchy. Hard to describe...1/8 inch thick, with little tiiiiiny holes, and not round...Light brown, nice hearty flavor. Any more suggestions?

    momma

    Melba toast? There's specialist little melba toasts which have a finer texture than homemade ones (where you toast bread, slice inbetween the toasted surfaces then toast the untoasted inside under the grill/broiler)
    Impera_Magna
    Mon May 30, 2005 7:12 am
    Food.com Groupie
    BigfatMomma wrote:
    The beaten biscuits sound good, but I don't know if those are right. These were not airy, but hard and crunchy. Hard to describe...1/8 inch thick, with little tiiiiiny holes, and not round...Light brown, nice hearty flavor. Any more suggestions?

    momma


    Beaten biscuits are not airy but more like a cracker. The air beaten into them would make them flaky rather than airy. The tiny holes poked in the biscuit make them more cracker-like as it prevents the biscuit from rising/puffing up in the center, creating an even thickness of the biscuit.

    The biscuits don't always come round; one could cut them into any shape desired. In fact, I think I saw one recipe that recommended cutting the dough into squares so that you didn't "lose" the scraps of the dough between the rounds.

    Beaten biscuits are very different from buttermilk biscuits/baking soda biscuits, which are light, fluffly and much thicker/higher.
    =====

    These Colonial Southern beaten biscuits are a rare treat and although you may find them occasionally in fine Southern restaurants and a few select caterers, they are very hard to come-by. They are most-often served today with Smithfield or Virginia Country Ham as an hors d'oeuvres as they are made much smaller than an average size Southern Biscuit.

    From: http://www.gardnersbarbecue.com/southern_recipes.html
    =====

    Biscuits

    The answer to where biscuits originated depends on the kind of biscuit you are thinking about. In some countries the word biscuit historically refers to a hard cookie or cracker. In the United States biscuits are generally small soft, yeast-based products served with breakfast or dinner. They perform a variety of functions including filling (hungry bellies), topping (eg. pies) and sopping (eg. biscuits & gravy).

    "Biscuit...The word derives from the Latin words "bis" (twice) plus "coctus" (cooked). In England a biscuit is what Americans usually call a cracker or cookie. The American meaning for biscuit was first noted by John Palmer in his Journal of Travels in the United States of North America, and in Lower Canada, (1818), and by 1828 Webster defined the confection as "a composition of flour and butter, made and baked in private families."

    In general usage such puffy leavened little breads were called "soda biscuits" or "baking-soda biscuits," in contrast to the unleavened cracker type....Recipes for soda biscuits are found in every ninetheenth-century cookbook, especially with reference to the cookery of the South... The South is also the home of the beaten biscuit, which was first mentioned in 1853..."


    ---The Encyclopedia of American Food and Drink, John F. Mariani [Lebhar-Friedman:New York] 1999 (page 29)
    =====

    However, you could have had something else other than beaten biscuits. It's just what came to mind given they were served at Mt. Vernon and in the bread tray.

    Hope you find what you're looking for. Good luck!
    E-mail me when someone replies to this
    Add this to My Favorite Topics
    Alert us of inappropriate posts

    Free Weekly Newsletter

    Get the latest recipes and tips delivered right to your inbox.

    Your e-mail is safe. Privacy Policy
    Advertisement

    Ideas from Food.com

    Powered by phpBB 2.0.1 © 2002 phpBB Group

    Over 475,000 Recipes

    Food.com Network of Sites