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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Asian Cooking / what is yat?
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    what is yat?

    chia
    Sat May 21, 2005 10:21 am
    Forum Host
    a new take out restaurant opened in my town, all the usual dishes, but a category for yat--with chicken, or beef, or shrimp, etc. the description says it is served with a brown sauce.
    mianbao
    Sat May 21, 2005 7:57 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    chia wrote:
    a new take out restaurant opened in my town, all the usual dishes, but a category for yat--with chicken, or beef, or shrimp, etc. the description says it is served with a brown sauce.

    I had never heard of that one, so, of course, I googled.

    I found yat mentioned on lots of menus, which seemed to be mainly between New York and D.C. For example, the HoWa Chinese Food Carry Out of Baltimore has this on its menu:
    Yat Gaw Mein
    Plain Yat Gaw Mein(no meat)
    Pork Yat Gaw Mein
    Pork Yat Gaw Mein with Gravy
    Pork Yat Gaw mein with Catsup

    Stir Fried Yat Gaw Mein
    Pork Fried Yat
    Chicken Fried Yat
    Beef Fried Yat
    Shrimp Fried Yat
    Plain Fried Yat(no meat)


    As far as I can tell, it's some kind of noodle. A person at a site in Japanese who ate yat in the U.S., claims that yat gaw mein is udon (I think you know, the thick Japanese white noodles), in a dark soup, like they eat in Tokyo.

    The Japanese can't seem to figure out how it could be written so far. (Since the writing carries the meaning, you know what it is if you can see it - the alphabetical romanization only gives the sound, which is no help.)

    A comment of Bernie at Alien Loves Predator dot com:
    Beef Yat Gaw Mein is a what a lot of hole in the wall Chinese takeouts have as a poor substitute for real Beef Stew Noodle Soup.

    China Wok, in New York:
    Shrimp and Chicken Yat Gaw Mein
    Cost: $3.75
    Description:
    Shrimp, chicken, and vegetables with yellow egg noodles.

    HTH
    chia
    Sun May 22, 2005 9:01 am
    Forum Host
    thanks mian, i was hoping you could help- i googled too but couldn't find anything. funny this is a noodle place and they do have a huge list of soups- i guess i will have to order it and find out--what you say makes perfect sense.
    btw my noodle class was cancelled again for the 3rd time icon_sad.gif
    Dejah
    Sun May 22, 2005 12:51 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    "Yat" means the number one, or used in "yat ga" to mean everyone in Cantonese.
    mianbao
    Sun May 22, 2005 4:19 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Dejah wrote:
    "Yat" means the number one, or used in "yat ga" to mean everyone in Cantonese.

    Oh! Come to think of it, I may have heard that when my old boss was studying Cantonese. So, "yat" means the best?
    Dejah
    Sun May 22, 2005 4:39 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    No, I don't think it means "the best". It means just the number one unless you say" di yat ming". Then it would mean the best.
    mianbao
    Sun May 22, 2005 5:44 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Dejah wrote:
    No, I don't think it means "the best". It means just the number one unless you say" di yat ming". Then it would mean the best.

    Hmmm. Then I wonder what it means in these menus. I think all the places using the word, "yat" that I found, were restaurants on the East coast of the U.S.

    This seems almost like the trouble we have here in Japan with their "English" words that do bear a remote resemblance to English words once you can figure them out. icon_biggrin.gif
    chia
    Tue May 24, 2005 7:12 am
    Forum Host
    so, we ordered a delivery yesterday at the office and you are right- but they used regular lo mein noodles, in fact, it was exactly like lo mein except that they poured a dark brown sauce over everything- not soupy but not dry- disappointing, i would have preferred udon icon_smile.gif.
    mianbao
    Tue May 24, 2005 4:23 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    chia wrote:
    so, we ordered a delivery yesterday at the office and you are right- but they used regular lo mein noodles, in fact, it was exactly like lo mein except that they poured a dark brown sauce over everything- not soupy but not dry- disappointing, i would have preferred udon icon_smile.gif.

    Hmm, interesting. So, not a soy sauce and dashi Japanese soup, but a sauce thickened with cornstarch or something like that. Flavored with soup stock? It sounds suspiciously like somebody invented it there and people have been copying it, but I could well be wrong.

    Thanks for the information - something not to order when I visit Mom. icon_biggrin.gif
    Cinizini
    Fri May 27, 2005 3:45 am
    Semi-Experienced "Sous Chef" Poster
    It's funny; it took me a minute but then I connected "yat gaw mein" with the seafood noodle soup that my family serves in their Chinese-American restaurant called "yakamein" (I think that's how they romanize it). At the restaurant and when my popo (grandma) makes it at home, it is soup noodles, fairly thick but not as thick as udon and probably wheat-based, served in a chicken broth base with various vegetables like peapods and bok choy and shrimp, sometimes scallops. I wish that I could see the characters for it; it's an interesting theory that it could be "Everyone noodles" (I guess that would be "yige mian" in Mandarin).
    Dejah
    Fri May 27, 2005 9:13 am
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    I used to serve yatgamein to my family. The noodles were flat, and I don't think it contained eggs. The noodles themselves have no flavour; it's all in the broth and additional ingredients.
    I liked to add Chinese mushrooms, shrimp, BBQ pork or lapcheung, some kind of choi, even lettuce if Chinese vegs were not in the fridge. Long pieces of green onion and cilantro will also work.

    I liked these noddles because they don't get mushy if they are left overs sitting in broth - as some other noodles do.

    This is usually served family style; that is, brought to the table in one huge bowl, then ladled out to individual bowls. Perhaps that's where the "everyone noodles" or "one family noodles" connotation came from.
    Cinizini
    Fri May 27, 2005 10:37 am
    Semi-Experienced "Sous Chef" Poster
    Dejah wrote:
    I used to serve yatgamein to my family. The noodles were flat, and I don't think it contained eggs. The noodles themselves have no flavour; it's all in the broth and additional ingredients.
    I liked to add Chinese mushrooms, shrimp, BBQ pork or lapcheung, some kind of choi, even lettuce if Chinese vegs were not in the fridge. Long pieces of green onion and cilantro will also work.

    I liked these noddles because they don't get mushy if they are left overs sitting in broth - as some other noodles do.

    This is usually served family style; that is, brought to the table in one huge bowl, then ladled out to individual bowls. Perhaps that's where the "everyone noodles" or "one family noodles" connotation came from.


    Yes, I remember now that we also put char-sieu in them but not lapcheung (our version anyway). I also remember dumping a lot of soy sauce into my bowl because I thought it was kind of bland. I don't eat it at all now that I live on my own. icon_confused.gif
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