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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Gardening, Herbs, Spices and More / Mixed Herb Plant - How do I use it?
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    Mixed Herb Plant - How do I use it?

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    Sue Lau
    Thu Jul 11, 2002 2:53 pm
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    Quote:

    The fuzzy leaves are confusing me. But what comes to mind and I think it's wrong is Borage. I'll do some looking and post later.

    I found a pic of borage so we can compare:

    http://www.erowid.org/herbs/show_image.php3?image=borage/borage_officinalis_plant1.jpg

    It doesn't look the same to me. a litle similar, perhaps, though.
    Sue Lau
    Thu Jul 11, 2002 3:06 pm
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    I want to take a gander and say that looks like a scented geranium to me, but putting it in meat dishes confuses me, because I haven't heard of that.

    The stems are the right color and the leaves are ruffled and just about the right shape. What does it smell like when you rub the leaves?

    *Hmmmm*
    Chrissyo
    Thu Jul 11, 2002 6:54 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Quote:

    Chrissy, do you get a little buz when you eat it?



    Hi Toasted, Hmmm, I am not sure I want to admit that it gives us a buz when we eat it on a public board. LOL



    Toasted, seriously, it is a refreshing taste when you eat it in meatballs (rissoles), meatloaf etc.
    Chrissyo
    Thu Jul 11, 2002 7:00 pm
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    Quote:

    I want to take a gander and say that looks like a scented geranium to me, but putting it in meat dishes confuses me, because I haven't heard of that.

    The stems are the right color and the leaves are ruffled and just about the right shape. What does it smell like when you rub the leaves?

    *Hmmmm*


    SueL that is what I was thinking it was a member of the geranium family.
    Chrissyo
    Thu Jul 11, 2002 7:02 pm
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    Quote:

    The fuzzy leaves are confusing me. But what comes to mind and I think it's wrong is Borage. I'll do some looking and post later.


    Bergy, Thank you. You are right the leaves are fuzzy and the leaves are thick and meaty.

    Thank you for your interest. I only called in a mixed herb plant because I think that is what me mother called it.
    Monstr
    Thu Jul 11, 2002 9:10 pm
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    Could it be Catnip Nepeta cataria? Does it have square stems? That would identify it as a member of the mint family.
    Sue Lau
    Fri Jul 12, 2002 1:49 am
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    The leaves on scented geraniums are fuzzy also.

    They come in a variety of scents; for culinary uses they are mostly steeped in liquid and the leaf discarded, and the liquid used in the dish.

    The scents I remember offhand are chocolate, peppermint, rose, lemon, can't think of just what else right now. But they come in others also.

    They get several feet tall during the course of the year. Different scents have some different shaped leaves so some pictures you see may be different. Most of them are generally heart-shaped, with a ruffly edge. They put out small flowers during the course of the summer, these are usually very small and singular compared to seed geraniums.
    Nimue2
    Fri Jul 12, 2002 10:15 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    it could be what we here in Florida call Cuban or Mexican Oregano. Does it have a scent a bit like oregano? It is also sometimees called Tropical Oregano...if it is what I suspect.
    Bergy
    Sat Jul 13, 2002 12:56 am
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    What color are the blooms? Borage are usually blue but I have ssen purple too. Borage is marvellous if you have a sprain or strained muscle you just put the leaves in vry hot water for a minutes and wrap them around the sore sprain etc. There is a very noxious odor but it sure sooths
    I have never seen geraniums with leaves this size but maybe it is.
    dale!
    Sat Jul 13, 2002 1:03 am
    Food.com Groupie
    O.K here it is- Plectranthus amboinicus aka Coleus amboinicus.
    Some other common names are '5 herb', 'mother of herb' and 'all herb'.
    Apparently it can go by these common names also indian borage, cuban oregano, broadleaf thyme, menthol plant, mexican oregano, spanish thyme, mexican mint.

    It was identified by the lovely people at garden web.
    To see the discussion-
    http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/namegal/msg070325397668.html?11
    Monstr
    Sat Jul 13, 2002 7:24 pm
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    Hooray dale! Mystery solved. BTW - checked out your picture - you have a lovely smile! icon_wink.gif
    Chrissyo
    Sun Jul 14, 2002 7:45 am
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    Dale, Thank you so very much for keeping on the "scent" of this herb. Just outstanding. I am releaved. It was so frustrating not knowing what this plant was. Cuban Oregano!

    I am stoked. Thank goodness that you can cook with this herb LOL I went to the site and checked it out. Thank you Dale. Very much appreicated.

    Here is more info that I found after I did a search.

    Spanish Thyme or Cuban Oregano is an unusual, fleshy leafed plant used as a culinary seasoning in the Caribbean. The brittle stems and colorful foliage resemble the common Coleus. Growth is slow in the winter months and moderate in spring and summer. Heat and direct sun don't seem to adversely affect growth or appearance. Insignificant flower stems form in the fall. It is extremely tender so grow in a protected area or keep it mobile in a pot so it can be placed in a controlled environment in the winter.

    Also known as Indian Borage; Daun Bangun-Banun, (M); Pok-Hor, (C); Po-Ho, (H).

    Indian Borage. The leaves emit a very strong aroma when handled.
    A succulent perennial herb that can reach 50 cm in height with fleshy leaves in opposite pairs. It occasionally produces pale violet flowers.

    Origin
    A plant cultivated and running wild in Malaysia. It is probably a native of India.

    Uses Leaves are mainly used in stuffing and for flavoring meat, also as a substitute for sage. Its strong smelling aromatic leaves are used medicinally by Indians as a cure for coughs.

    This information is from the The Singapore Science Center.


    Cultural Information

    Height:2 Feet

    Hardiness: Zone 10

    Flower Color: White

    Characteristics: Full/
    Partial Sun, Evergreen

    Uses: Culinary, Fragrant
    Chrissyo
    Sun Jul 14, 2002 7:47 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Quote:

    it could be what we here in Florida call Cuban or Mexican Oregano. Does it have a scent a bit like oregano? It is also sometimees called Tropical Oregano...if it is what I suspect.


    Gosh Nimue2. You really know your herbs. We have been racking our brains for ages trying to work this one out. Dale went to a garden web site and checked it out.

    Good job Nimue2 icon_smile.gif I hope we hear from you more.
    cheers
    Chris
    Bergy
    Sun Jul 14, 2002 10:29 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Hey gang I think we should open a detective agency with Dale as head sleuth! Sure glad this one is solved. It's fun following through something likethis.
    Sorry I meant to put Nimue2 at the top of the sleuth list too!
    Chrissyo
    Sun Jul 14, 2002 9:32 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Bergy, A great suggestion. Dale and Nimue2 super plant sleuths. LOL

    It sure bugged me no knowing what the plant was. Now I can sound posh when I say it'a Cuban Oregano herb. LOL Much better name than mixed herb. LOL
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