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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Grilling / BBQ / Smoking / Outdoor cooking Methods & Cooking Times & Temp!
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    Outdoor cooking Methods & Cooking Times & Temp!

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    Rita~
    Tue Oct 31, 2006 8:29 pm
    Forum Host
    Smoky Okie wrote:
    boss44l wrote:
    What about smoking times for all you have here for grilling?
    I smoke whole chickens and ribs pretty well but can't seem to find how long per pound for other meats i.e. steaks, brisket, roasts, fish. Is there a good source set up in this fashion for all????


    Hey Boss,
    I'm new to this forum, but about 30 years experienced to smoking meat. I can answer your question about brisket and por butt, there is no time per #, it's all about internal temp.. Brisket 190*, and pork butt, 190* for slicing, and 200* for pulling.

    I can probably answer 95% of your questions when it comes to smoking. Feel free to rattle my cage if you have a particular project in mind.
    Please do stick around to answer questions! They won`t come to often this time of the year but hang out with us any time all the time you want!
    Any info is welcomed! More the merrier! icon_wink.gif
    Smoky Okie
    Wed Nov 01, 2006 11:23 am
    Food.com Groupie
    icon_redface.gif I'm sorry, I keep forgetting that for some folks, BBQing is a seasonal thing. To us, a nice pulled pork butt actually seems to taste better when it's cold out, and we couldn't possibly go all winter w/o a few nice racks of spare ribs.

    Thanx for the hospitality Rita, I will most likely hang around.

    Tim
    Rita~
    Wed Nov 01, 2006 8:44 pm
    Forum Host
    Great Tim! Happy Grilling icon_exclaim.gif
    Red Apple Guy
    Thu Nov 02, 2006 8:47 am
    Forum Host
    Smoky Okie wrote:
    ............I can answer your question about brisket and por butt, there is no time per #, it's all about internal temp.. Brisket 190*, and pork butt, 190* for slicing, and 200* for pulling..........

    True, and not just for smoking, I think that advice works for oven roasting, crockpots, and grilling. The issue is internal temperaure. These days, people smoking are more and more apt to monitor temperatures than in the old days and the logic applies to other cooking devices as well. I've used 'em in crockpots and my oven. It's the best way to get juicy chicken from your grill or pulled pork from a Boston Butt.
    Smoky Okie
    Thu Nov 02, 2006 11:10 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Do you have a remote thermo? I couldn't do w/o mine, well I say that, but I guessI did for 30 years. Anyway, I really like mine.

    I use it more for indoor than outdoor cooking. I still go mostly by feel and look for grilling, but it does come awful handy for that perfect medium pork loin roast on indirect heat.

    the only problem I've had is when I found out that you can't put the probe or wire either one directly over hot coals. they can't take that much heat. icon_redface.gif
    Red Apple Guy
    Fri Nov 03, 2006 6:12 am
    Forum Host
    Smoky Okie wrote:
    Do you have a remote thermo? I couldn't do w/o mine, well I say that, but I guessI did for 30 years. Anyway, I really like mine.

    I use it more for indoor than outdoor cooking. I still go mostly by feel and look for grilling, but it does come awful handy for that perfect medium pork loin roast on indirect heat.

    the only problem I've had is when I found out that you can't put the probe or wire either one directly over hot coals. they can't take that much heat. icon_redface.gif

    I've had a couple of probe and wire units (Polder) but just ruined the last one. icon_cry.gif I haven't gone to the wireless remote type yet but may. What's brand do you like? Maverick? other?
    Smoky Okie
    Fri Nov 03, 2006 12:22 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Just a cheap Taylor. It does what I ask it to. I think I paid $15-$20 for it @ a local surplus store.
    boss44l
    Tue Nov 07, 2006 2:07 pm
    Regular "Line Cook" Poster
    Hey Smokey, Here's a question for you. I'm going to do a Turkey again this year. Did a 12 lb bird and it took 12 hrs.
    Most of these sites say 1/2 hr per lb but most of the time it seems 1 hr lb is more like it. I have an electric smoker and the only time I open it up is to add more chips. I'm in NH so it usually quite cold when I'm smokin so I wrap the smoker in a quilted moving blanket. I brine and use a store bought rub, I like Lysanders poultry rub.
    1 hr lb makes sense to me cause I often times do a 7-8 lb whole chicken and that takes usually 7 hrs and it could have taken more. I do cut the backbone out and remove the breastbone to cook the chicken but the turkey will be too big for my smoker if I do that to it.
    Smoker is a good 250 on the top rack where most of the cookin is done and the bird is done to the right temp before it comes off but sometimes not fallin off the bone.
    Am I doing something wrong?
    Smoky Okie
    Tue Nov 07, 2006 3:53 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    It doesn't sound to me like you're doing anything wrong. If you're using a bullet smoker and you want the meat to be "falling off the bone", you can almost do no wrong. So long as you keep water in the pan you should be good to go.

    If you're not using a water pan, I would suggest that you do.

    What type of thermo are you using? The ones that come on smokers are notorious for inaccuracy. You can test it by taking it out and placing it in boiling water, It should always read 212*.

    There are alot of variables including recovery time from heat loss, ambient temp, wind conditions, etc.. My advice would be to learn your smoker, and ignore general rules.

    If you want the meat to fall off the bone, you just need more cook time. We want ours to still have good tenacity for slicing purposes. To us falling off the bone is overcooked.

    Try cooking it until you can almost pull the leg out of the socket. You can do this w/o drying out too bad by dropping the temp to 175* or so once the bird is done, and holding it there. As to how long you need to leave it there, I can't say, but I can guess probably 2-3 more hours.

    Something else you might try is putting the bird in an oven bag once it gets a good coat of smoke on it. This will help smoke penetration as well as helping to steam the bird.

    Why do you removve the backbone and breast bone when you cook yardbird?
    boss44l
    Wed Nov 08, 2006 7:48 am
    Regular "Line Cook" Poster
    Thanks Smokey. Good info. I remove he back and breastbones because I saw Alton on food channel do it once and it makes for a nice presentation and a little quicker cooking time.
    I don't have a thermometer installed in my bullet smoker I just use a meat thermometer towards the end of the cook time. I used my oven therm from the house to check my smoker temp on both levels and it is just about pegged at 250 on top level and 225-30 on the lower level. Thanks again. Where are you from Smokey? I am in NH and I use my smoker as much in the winter as I do the summer.
    Smoky Okie
    Wed Nov 08, 2006 11:41 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I live outside Tulsa, Oklahoma. That's why I'm Smokey Okie, and we grill/smoke 4 or 5 times a week year round!

    It wouldn't be difficult to install a thermo on most bullet smokers. That would give you the ability to monitor temps w/o having to lift the lid. I wouldn't try drilling any holes if your unit is porcelain like a Weber though.

    Academy Sports, and most grill stores sell thermos that look like a meat thermo w/ a short stem and a mounting nut for about $10. Just drill a hole in the top of the dome the same diameter as the threaded part, insert the thermo, and tighten the nut. Even if it won't tell you what the temp on the bottom rack is, it'll let you know what the overall situation is in the unit, and you can translate by your experience from there.

    In your earlier post, you stated that you kept your temp @ a certain level. If you don't have a thermo, are you depending on the accuracy of the temp control on your smoker? I wouldn't count on that method at all.

    Does your smoker have an open bottom? If it does, make sure that it is in a place where no wind blows across it.

    We like to smoke our yardbird BCC style w/rub up under the breast skin. It makes for good slicing meat, and the steam from the can keeps it nice and moist. I've heard arguments from both sides, but I don't think you get much flavor from what's in the can. If you want flavor on the inside of the cavity, season it.

    One more little tip, if you want to cook @ higher temps and wtaer isn't an issue, you can fill your water pan w/sand. It will act as a heat sink like the water, but it won't reduce temps like evaporating water does.


    Good luck and good chewin'
    Tim
    boss44l
    Wed Nov 08, 2006 4:15 pm
    Regular "Line Cook" Poster
    It's an electric smoker and that's just what it is consistantly on both levels. I have no way to regulate it but I love the set it and forget it way with the electric. I have a big wood fired smoker but the 1st time I used it I turned a 5 lb brisket into a 2 lb lump of charred junk. Long story but a failed attempt regardless. Wife and I are busy havin fun in the summer and winter time I'll have more time to pay attention so I'll give it a try again and again till I get it right. Got it for free and very gratefull for that but I need more time to learn it's ways.
    I just got overruled today for the smoked bird for turkey day. I'll do it for Christmas eve when I have the folks and brother and all the kids over. Merry Christmas if they don't want it then. I think I'll still smoke some venison for me and my dad on turkey day. Any pointers on that??
    Smoky Okie
    Wed Nov 08, 2006 4:27 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I can probably help you w/ your big smoker problems. I've owned, designed, built and cooked on several of them. I guess you can't send private messages on this board unless you buy a membership, and I don't think they allow email addresses, but I'll be hanging aroung this forum, so feel free to ask anything anytime.

    BTW, brisket is my specialty.

    Good luck and Good Smoke rings,
    Tim
    Mama's Kitchen (Hope)
    Tue Nov 28, 2006 2:23 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Welcome Boss!

    Sorry we didnt see you here! I missed your post in here.

    This may help answer some of your questions. Feel free to post any that are not answered in that thread. It will get noticed more quickly there.

    Glad to have you join us!


    Click to go to This Turkey is Smokin!

    http://www.recipezaar.com/bb/viewtopic.zsp?t=183867
    Mama's Kitchen (Hope)
    Wed Apr 23, 2008 9:00 am
    Food.com Groupie
    .......
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