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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Breads & Baking / Not too impressed with my Kitchenaid dough hook!
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    Not too impressed with my Kitchenaid dough hook!

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    Jan in Lanark
    Fri Apr 08, 2005 2:32 pm
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    After biting the bullet and purchasing a Kitchenaid mixer, I thought I would really enjoy the dough hook attachment. Well, I've made the basic white bread and rye bread from the booklet and I must say that both times the bread was too dense and heavy. I'm quite well known for my homemade bread icon_redface.gif that I knead by hand. Am I doing something wrong?- following manufacturer's instructions. I don't even like the consistency of the dough before it rises.
    Heather Sullivan
    Fri Apr 08, 2005 2:59 pm
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    How long are you letting it knead for after it's come together as a dough? Are you adding too much flour?
    *Parsley*
    Fri Apr 08, 2005 3:31 pm
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    I wasn't too thrilled with my dough hook attachment, either......but I DO LOVE the mixer itself! I found it easier to just knead by hand.....easier to "feel" that it's the right consistancy. icon_cool.gif
    Jan in Lanark
    Fri Apr 08, 2005 4:35 pm
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    Parsley72 wrote:
    I wasn't too thrilled with my dough hook attachment, either......but I DO LOVE the mixer itself! I found it easier to just knead by hand.....easier to "feel" that it's the right consistancy. icon_cool.gif


    Well I'm so glad it's not just me. I think you're right, you really need to feel the dough- it's not that I mind kneading- just thought it would be a timesaver. For the cost of the darn things they should also bake the bread icon_smile.gif But I am enjoying it for all the other things it does. I was kneading for 3-4 minutes or whatever the book says. I may try it again sometime in the future, but for now I'll stick with what works best for me icon_wink.gif
    Heather Sullivan
    Fri Apr 08, 2005 4:49 pm
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    what I do is 3 minutes, rest for a minut, 3 more minutes usually or until it's the right feel. Are you using bread flour, gluten or just all-purpose flour?
    MEAN CHEF
    Fri Apr 08, 2005 7:33 pm
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    Nothing at all wrong with mine.
    justcallmejulie
    Sat Apr 09, 2005 3:28 am
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    I NEVER knead by hand anymore. I only use the Kitchenaid dough hook. In fact I have had amazing success with MEAN's Buttermilk and Honey bread, and Anna P's Sweet Bread. I also make pizza dough in there too. I doub't i would even make bread if I didn't have mine.
    Jan in Lanark
    Sat Apr 09, 2005 7:33 am
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    Heather Sullivan wrote:
    what I do is 3 minutes, rest for a minut, 3 more minutes usually or until it's the right feel. Are you using bread flour, gluten or just all-purpose flour?


    I'm using all purpose and of course some rye flour for the rye bread. Maybe I should try the resting period. I really would like to utilize this tool. Perhaps my problem is using the recipes in the booklet rather than my own. Do you use your own recipe?
    Heather Sullivan
    Sat Apr 09, 2005 8:06 am
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    Jan in Lanark wrote:
    Heather Sullivan wrote:
    what I do is 3 minutes, rest for a minut, 3 more minutes usually or until it's the right feel. Are you using bread flour, gluten or just all-purpose flour?


    I'm using all purpose and of course some rye flour for the rye bread. Maybe I should try the resting period. I really would like to utilize this tool. Perhaps my problem is using the recipes in the booklet rather than my own. Do you use your own recipe?

    yes and I usually use strong/bread flour. It has more gluten which helps trap the gases the yeast produce to make a nice light product.
    tasb
    Sun Apr 10, 2005 4:24 pm
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    In cooking school we kneaded the dough for 10 minutes even in the machine using the dough hook.
    Pumpkie
    Mon Apr 11, 2005 6:52 am
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    I do both with the hook and by hand. I have never used the recipes in the booklet I've used my own and Mean chef's. I just made Mean Chef's pizza dough with it, maybe its just a matter of getting use to it or using a different recipe.
    Iron Bloomers
    Tue Apr 12, 2005 5:17 am
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    gotta say I have never had a problem with the hook on mine.
    I make bread both by hand & with the KA.....same results for the same recipe either way.

    try using a little less flour........do the last minute or so by hand....getting a hands on feel for the dough is a 'tell all' about the final results.

    hth

    IB
    Cooking at the Cottage
    Sun Apr 17, 2005 9:15 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Hi Jan,
    I use my Kitchen Aid almost exclusively for breads, mostly pizza. I generally increase recipes to 9 cups of flour and 'knead' for a full 10 minutes. If it starts to crawl up the hook, I lower the bowl a bit and it drops back down.

    I always finishes my breads with one or two minutes of hand kneading (more ,I think, so I can call it hand-kneaded).

    I took my bread maker to the cottage because it got so little work at home. There it come in real handy on the weekends I forget to pack the bread. LOL

    ~Inez
    fawn512
    Wed Apr 20, 2005 1:52 am
    Food.com Groupie
    i havn't baked any bread in my entire baking career (well, i just started last year LOL)

    I have an artisan KA mixer. I don' t know how to knead. Is it possible to use only the mixer and not knead at all?

    And i have no idea what yeasts to buy (i don't live in the US) and the types..... i have to educate myself first. icon_wink.gif

    I just read that yeast must be activated with a certain degree of warm water. i don't have a thermometer..do i need to purchase one?
    Donna M.
    Wed Apr 20, 2005 11:14 am
    Forum Host
    fawn512 wrote:
    i havn't baked any bread in my entire baking career (well, i just started last year LOL)

    I have an artisan KA mixer. I don' t know how to knead. Is it possible to use only the mixer and not knead at all?

    And i have no idea what yeasts to buy (i don't live in the US) and the types..... i have to educate myself first. icon_wink.gif

    I just read that yeast must be activated with a certain degree of warm water. i don't have a thermometer..do i need to purchase one?


    Hi Fawn,
    I don't own a KA mixer so I can't answer your questions about them, but there are plenty of members on here that have them and I'm sure someone will come on soon to help you with that. I'm pretty sure that you do all the kneading in the machine.

    Where do you live? Here in the US we have 2 main types of dry yeast: Instant (also referred to as 'quick' or 'bread machine' yeast) OR traditional. The instant variety is added dry with the flour; the traditional must be softened in some liquid first and then added. I prefer to use the traditional yeast, but many bakers use the instant. Instant is not good for refrigerated doughs or multiple rises, as it tends to poop out after one rise.

    As for the water temperature, you don't really need a thermometer. The water should feel just barely warm when you stick a finger into it--never hot. I have always used this method and it has worked for me for years.

    Have fun with your bread baking and remember that if you need help there are always plenty of experienced bakers here to ask questions of.
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