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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Breads & Baking / Israeli Pita Bread
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    Israeli Pita Bread

    Skipper/Sy
    Thu Mar 31, 2005 5:04 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    There is a difference from Greek Middle Eastern Pita bread and Israeli Pita Bread. The Greek Pita Breads are thiner, while the Israeli Pita Breads are thicker...

    Does anyone have a recipe for Israeli Pita Bread...

    Skipper/Sy
    icon_cool.gif
    Chipfo
    Thu Mar 31, 2005 9:52 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I don't know the ethnic differences in pita bread but I did find this -

    http://www.bridgesforpeace.com/publications/dispatch/food/Article-34.html

    Maybe it is what you are looking for, the recipe came from a book called Taste of Israel.
    CarrolJ
    Thu Apr 07, 2005 9:44 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Chipfo wrote:
    I don't know the ethnic differences in pita bread but I did find this -

    http://www.bridgesforpeace.com/publications/dispatch/food/Article-34.html

    Maybe it is what you are looking for, the recipe came from a book called Taste of Israel.


    How about posting a version of this on Zaar so that we bread makers can put it into our cookbooks. I would love to add several pita recipes to mine. I love pita...but since I am the only one in my family who likes it, so it is a waste for me to purchase it. I would love to start making small batches for me to enjoy.
    Cooking at the Cottage
    Sun Apr 17, 2005 9:26 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Greek Pita Bread

    These are supposed to be a thicker, pocketless version of pita bread.

    ~Inez
    Chipfo
    Sun Apr 17, 2005 9:41 am
    Food.com Groupie
    CarrolJ wrote:
    Chipfo wrote:
    I don't know the ethnic differences in pita bread but I did find this -

    http://www.bridgesforpeace.com/publications/dispatch/food/Article-34.html

    Maybe it is what you are looking for, the recipe came from a book called Taste of Israel.


    How about posting a version of this on Zaar so that we bread makers can put it into our cookbooks. I would love to add several pita recipes to mine. I love pita...but since I am the only one in my family who likes it, so it is a waste for me to purchase it. I would love to start making small batches for me to enjoy.


    Hello Carol, I would post the recipe but I have never tried it and I would have to make it and like it before I posted it, I know some people post recipes they have never tried but I would be embarrased if it was actually a flop. If you want to try it and post feel free, right now I have enough bread to eat up and a friend is on my case for some yeast dinner rolls, my aunt and another friend wants a loaf each of my dilly cottage bread and everyone wants some sourdough bread icon_biggrin.gif

    Everybody wants homemade bread but they want ME to make it icon_eek.gif
    CarrolJ
    Mon Apr 18, 2005 12:19 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Chipfo wrote:
    CarrolJ wrote:
    Chipfo wrote:
    I don't know the ethnic differences in pita bread but I did find this -

    http://www.bridgesforpeace.com/publications/dispatch/food/Article-34.html

    Maybe it is what you are looking for, the recipe came from a book called Taste of Israel.


    How about posting a version of this on Zaar so that we bread makers can put it into our cookbooks. I would love to add several pita recipes to mine. I love pita...but since I am the only one in my family who likes it, so it is a waste for me to purchase it. I would love to start making small batches for me to enjoy.


    Hello Carol, I would post the recipe but I have never tried it and I would have to make it and like it before I posted it, I know some people post recipes they have never tried but I would be embarrased if it was actually a flop. If you want to try it and post feel free, right now I have enough bread to eat up and a friend is on my case for some yeast dinner rolls, my aunt and another friend wants a loaf each of my dilly cottage bread and everyone wants some sourdough bread icon_biggrin.gif

    Everybody wants homemade bread but they want ME to make it icon_eek.gif


    I also do not post recipes I haven't made myself and for the same reason. I copied the recipe and put it into a word document so that I could try it. I have never made pita bread before. If I like it and no one else has posted it by then I will post it.

    Are pita recipes different just like other bread recipes or are they pretty standard?
    Chipfo
    Mon Apr 18, 2005 7:27 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    CarrolJ wrote:
    Chipfo wrote:
    CarrolJ wrote:
    Chipfo wrote:
    I don't know the ethnic differences in pita bread but I did find this -

    http://www.bridgesforpeace.com/publications/dispatch/food/Article-34.html

    Maybe it is what you are looking for, the recipe came from a book called Taste of Israel.


    How about posting a version of this on Zaar so that we bread makers can put it into our cookbooks. I would love to add several pita recipes to mine. I love pita...but since I am the only one in my family who likes it, so it is a waste for me to purchase it. I would love to start making small batches for me to enjoy.


    Hello Carol, I would post the recipe but I have never tried it and I would have to make it and like it before I posted it, I know some people post recipes they have never tried but I would be embarrased if it was actually a flop. If you want to try it and post feel free, right now I have enough bread to eat up and a friend is on my case for some yeast dinner rolls, my aunt and another friend wants a loaf each of my dilly cottage bread and everyone wants some sourdough bread icon_biggrin.gif

    Everybody wants homemade bread but they want ME to make it icon_eek.gif


    I also do not post recipes I haven't made myself and for the same reason. I copied the recipe and put it into a word document so that I could try it. I have never made pita bread before. If I like it and no one else has posted it by then I will post it.

    Are pita recipes different just like other bread recipes or are they pretty standard?


    I have made Pita bread before, once or twice, but from the recipes I have seen the ingredients are pretty standard, the technic is what differs. Most pita breads only call for flour, water, yeast, sugar and salt, some will use cornmeal on the outside of the breads.

    There are variing technics, some will have you stack the pita's between parchment or wax paper to rest after shaping for 5 minutes(after the initial rise and punch down), some will have you place the pita's in a paper sack with a damp cloth to cool after baking or a plastic bag, I have seen recipes that tells how to get the pocket in it by placing the shaped dough on the lowest rack on a stone (if available) at 500 F to crisp the outside quikly and puff up, then raise them to the middle of the oven to finish cooking which creates the pocket Pita's are known for, they deflate while cooling. Some sprinkle cornmeal on the baking sheets and have you turn them half way through to brown evenly. Some roll there circles out to 1/16 inch while others say 1/4 inch. I would think 1/16 inch would create pita crackers, but....

    The recipe link above kneads the dough, lets the dough rise, divides the dough then kneads them again to form balls and lets them rest for 30-40 minutes before shaping into circles (instead of shaping and resting for 5 minutes) and bakes them at 500 F to puff then places them in a plastic bag to cool, it also uses cornmeal on the baking surface. It looks like a very good recipe to try, I think I will now icon_biggrin.gif , be sure and let me know here if you do first so we don't post the same recipe, it will be a week or so before I can try it. icon_smile.gif

    So....There is definately differences in technic while the ingredients are all very simular.
    CarrolJ
    Tue Apr 19, 2005 10:20 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Chipfo wrote:
    CarrolJ wrote:
    Chipfo wrote:
    CarrolJ wrote:
    Chipfo wrote:
    I don't know the ethnic differences in pita bread but I did find this -

    http://www.bridgesforpeace.com/publications/dispatch/food/Article-34.html

    Maybe it is what you are looking for, the recipe came from a book called Taste of Israel.


    How about posting a version of this on Zaar so that we bread makers can put it into our cookbooks. I would love to add several pita recipes to mine. I love pita...but since I am the only one in my family who likes it, so it is a waste for me to purchase it. I would love to start making small batches for me to enjoy.


    Hello Carol, I would post the recipe but I have never tried it and I would have to make it and like it before I posted it, I know some people post recipes they have never tried but I would be embarrased if it was actually a flop. If you want to try it and post feel free, right now I have enough bread to eat up and a friend is on my case for some yeast dinner rolls, my aunt and another friend wants a loaf each of my dilly cottage bread and everyone wants some sourdough bread icon_biggrin.gif

    Everybody wants homemade bread but they want ME to make it icon_eek.gif


    I also do not post recipes I haven't made myself and for the same reason. I copied the recipe and put it into a word document so that I could try it. I have never made pita bread before. If I like it and no one else has posted it by then I will post it.

    Are pita recipes different just like other bread recipes or are they pretty standard?


    I have made Pita bread before, once or twice, but from the recipes I have seen the ingredients are pretty standard, the technic is what differs. Most pita breads only call for flour, water, yeast, sugar and salt, some will use cornmeal on the outside of the breads.

    There are variing technics, some will have you stack the pita's between parchment or wax paper to rest after shaping for 5 minutes(after the initial rise and punch down), some will have you place the pita's in a paper sack with a damp cloth to cool after baking or a plastic bag, I have seen recipes that tells how to get the pocket in it by placing the shaped dough on the lowest rack on a stone (if available) at 500 F to crisp the outside quikly and puff up, then raise them to the middle of the oven to finish cooking which creates the pocket Pita's are known for, they deflate while cooling. Some sprinkle cornmeal on the baking sheets and have you turn them half way through to brown evenly. Some roll there circles out to 1/16 inch while others say 1/4 inch. I would think 1/16 inch would create pita crackers, but....

    The recipe link above kneads the dough, lets the dough rise, divides the dough then kneads them again to form balls and lets them rest for 30-40 minutes before shaping into circles (instead of shaping and resting for 5 minutes) and bakes them at 500 F to puff then places them in a plastic bag to cool, it also uses cornmeal on the baking surface. It looks like a very good recipe to try, I think I will now icon_biggrin.gif , be sure and let me know here if you do first so we don't post the same recipe, it will be a week or so before I can try it. icon_smile.gif

    So....There is definately differences in technic while the ingredients are all very simular.


    I also may not be able to make it before next week. I am supposed to finish my physical therapy on Thursday and am looking forward to feeling better next week when it is all over. Unfortunately this therapy has actually made me feel worse and although I promised to finish the course I am looking forward to finishing and being able to get through my day with less discomfort.

    This recipe sounds easier than some you described. Some of those methods sound pretty complicated for what I thought was a simple little bread. Thanks for the explanation.

    I will look forward to trying it. I especially like putting salad greens and cold leftover meat in a pita bread for a sort of salad sandwich. I used to eat lots of them this way in the past years when I was trying to lose some weight. I found I developed a real taste for it that way and found it quite filling.

    I would love to have it more often than I do. I gave up dieting about 7 or 8 years ago. (I decided to love myself the way I am! The benefits were amazingly positive!)...But would still enjoy being able to have pita sandwiches for lunch or a snack.
    Dib's
    Thu Apr 28, 2005 8:43 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Good Morning-

    You could fiddle with the thickness using this recipe for Pita Bread.

    Di icon_wink.gif
    CarrolJ
    Thu Apr 28, 2005 9:53 am
    Food.com Groupie
    DiB's wrote:
    Good Morning-

    You could fiddle with the thickness using this recipe for Pita Bread.

    Di icon_wink.gif


    Thanks Dibs!

    I especially liked when reading your recipe and the reviews to hear that several chefs used their dough cycle in their ABM...I was thinking the same and wondering if it would work...and cooked them on a baking stone...which I was also wondering about using! (I like keeping the flour mess inside the machine since spending lots of time cleaning up the mess when doing it by hand is not my idea of fun!)

    I actually created a new cookbook titled Pita Bread Recipes in preparation for gathering the various Pita Bread recipes!

    This sounds like it will be as challenging as learning to make wild yeast sourdough bread was and just as fun!

    Hey all you pita bread chefs...does anyone have a sourdough pita recipe? Boy would I enjoy combining the two!
    Donna M.
    Thu Apr 28, 2005 11:12 am
    Forum Host
    Of course I have a sourdough pita bread recipe, Carrol! It comes from Ed Wood's book, and I haven't made a recipe of his yet that hasn't been good. I haven't made it yet, myself. I think a lot of people aren't seeing this recipe because of the title (don't recognize it as a 'pita'.)

    Sourdough Mannaneesh
    CarrolJ
    Thu Apr 28, 2005 11:40 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Donna M. wrote:
    Of course I have a sourdough pita bread recipe, Carrol! It comes from Ed Wood's book, and I haven't made a recipe of his yet that hasn't been good. I haven't made it yet, myself. I think a lot of people aren't seeing this recipe because of the title (don't recognize it as a 'pita'.)

    Sourdough Mannaneesh


    Thanks Donna! I never would have known if you hadn't pointed it out. I'm saving it to my new pita cookbook...hope I remember later that it is one! You should have put the word Pita in parenthesis after the word Mannaneesh!
    Skipper/Sy
    Fri May 06, 2005 8:55 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I have been talkng to an experienced bread chef and he uses BREAD FLOUR for making breads and pita. It produces a superior product. Plus he does not add any sugar, since the bread flour contains malts which break down sugars in the dough and helps the yeast raise...

    Skipper/Sy
    icon_cool.gif
    CarrolJ
    Sun May 08, 2005 1:37 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Skipper/Sy wrote:
    I have been talkng to an experienced bread chef and he uses BREAD FLOUR for making breads and pita. It produces a superior product. Plus he does not add any sugar, since the bread flour contains malts which break down sugars in the dough and helps the yeast raise...

    Skipper/Sy
    icon_cool.gif


    Dear Skipper/Sy: I am really happy to hear that about the bread flour! I have seen a great improvement in both the commercial yeast and wild starter yeast breads since I switched to using only bread flour! Plus when you purchase it from Sam's Club it is cheaper than buying regular flour at the grocery stores as well. I don't know if Costco carries it now or not. There is no Costco within 50 miles of my house so I can not go there anymore. I used to love it when we lived in Denver...we were members of both Costco and Sam's Club and could shop for bargains at both of them.
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