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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Breads & Baking / Over baking Question
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    Over baking Question

    Gina*S
    Sat Feb 12, 2005 9:48 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    How exactly do you tell when bread is done? I'm having a lot of success with my bread making lately, but I do tend to pull it out a bit soon.
    What will happen to it if I over bake it? Will it just get too brown or will something happen to the texture and or taste as well???
    TIA, Gina
    Donna M.
    Sat Feb 12, 2005 10:14 pm
    Forum Host
    Overbaking will cause the crust to get thicker and harder, and eventually will dry out your bread. Some cooks use the 'thump on the loaf' test--if it sounds hollow, it's done. I, personally, don't do well with that test but many swear by it. After you bake a few more loaves you will start to just know when it is done.

    I have found that I prefer to bake most loaf breads at 350F, even if the recipe says 375. That is the temperature that gives me the best crust and moist interior. I like a thin but crispy crust on my bread.

    I'm glad you are having some successes with your bread lately. Practice makes perfect, you know!
    MEAN CHEF
    Sat Feb 12, 2005 11:20 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Yeast breads are done with an internal temperature of 195-205 degrees
    Gina*S
    Sun Feb 13, 2005 12:02 am
    Food.com Groupie
    MEAN CHEF wrote:
    Yeast breads are done with an internal temperature of 195-205 degrees

    Mean, are you suggesting that I use a probe thermometer in my bread? Interesting... If I do... would you suggest 195 with a rest of... 15 mins...? If I'm making two loaves in a standard oven would they both reach that at the same time(ish?)??
    Gina*S
    Sun Feb 13, 2005 12:16 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Donna M. wrote:
    Overbaking will cause the crust to get thicker and harder, and eventually will dry out your bread. Some cooks use the 'thump on the loaf' test--if it sounds hollow, it's done. I, personally, don't do well with that test but many swear by it. After you bake a few more loaves you will start to just know when it is done.

    I have found that I prefer to bake most loaf breads at 350F, even if the recipe says 375. That is the temperature that gives me the best crust and moist interior. I like a thin but crispy crust on my bread.

    I'm glad you are having some successes with your bread lately. Practice makes perfect, you know!

    I like thin and crispy crusts too for the most part. One of the recipes I've been using calls for 350 (Amish White Bread), and the other calls for 400French Bread Rolls to die for). Zaar is acting up or I would paste the recipes) I know that all ovens are different, so I'm just trying to get a good 'feel' for what mine is able to do.
    Gina
    MEAN CHEF
    Sun Feb 13, 2005 11:53 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Gina*S wrote:
    MEAN CHEF wrote:
    Yeast breads are done with an internal temperature of 195-205 degrees

    Mean, are you suggesting that I use a probe thermometer in my bread? Interesting... If I do... would you suggest 195 with a rest of... 15 mins...? If I'm making two loaves in a standard oven would they both reach that at the same time(ish?)??


    They may not reach temperature at exactly the same time.
    MEAN CHEF
    Sun Feb 13, 2005 11:56 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Gina*S wrote:
    Donna M. wrote:
    Overbaking will cause the crust to get thicker and harder, and eventually will dry out your bread. Some cooks use the 'thump on the loaf' test--if it sounds hollow, it's done. I, personally, don't do well with that test but many swear by it. After you bake a few more loaves you will start to just know when it is done.

    I have found that I prefer to bake most loaf breads at 350F, even if the recipe says 375. That is the temperature that gives me the best crust and moist interior. I like a thin but crispy crust on my bread.

    I'm glad you are having some successes with your bread lately. Practice makes perfect, you know!

    I like thin and crispy crusts too for the most part. One of the recipes I've been using calls for 350 (Amish White Bread), and the other calls for 400French Bread Rolls to die for). Zaar is acting up or I would paste the recipes) I know that all ovens are different, so I'm just trying to get a good 'feel' for what mine is able to do.
    Gina


    French bread is normally cooked at a high temperature. The temperature will not determine the type of crust as much as what type of bread.
    Gina*S
    Sun Feb 13, 2005 12:18 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    MEAN CHEF wrote:
    Gina*S wrote:
    Donna M. wrote:
    Overbaking will cause the crust to get thicker and harder, and eventually will dry out your bread. Some cooks use the 'thump on the loaf' test--if it sounds hollow, it's done. I, personally, don't do well with that test but many swear by it. After you bake a few more loaves you will start to just know when it is done.

    I have found that I prefer to bake most loaf breads at 350F, even if the recipe says 375. That is the temperature that gives me the best crust and moist interior. I like a thin but crispy crust on my bread.

    I'm glad you are having some successes with your bread lately. Practice makes perfect, you know!

    I like thin and crispy crusts too for the most part. One of the recipes I've been using calls for 350 (Amish White Bread), and the other calls for 400French Bread Rolls to die for). Zaar is acting up or I would paste the recipes) I know that all ovens are different, so I'm just trying to get a good 'feel' for what mine is able to do.
    Gina


    French bread is normally cooked at a high temperature. The temperature will not determine the type of crust as much as what type of bread.

    Hmm... now I'm confused. I know the recipe is important, but I always thought the higher the temp, the crispier the crust.
    MEAN CHEF
    Sun Feb 13, 2005 12:21 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Gina*S wrote:
    MEAN CHEF wrote:
    Gina*S wrote:
    Donna M. wrote:
    Overbaking will cause the crust to get thicker and harder, and eventually will dry out your bread. Some cooks use the 'thump on the loaf' test--if it sounds hollow, it's done. I, personally, don't do well with that test but many swear by it. After you bake a few more loaves you will start to just know when it is done.

    I have found that I prefer to bake most loaf breads at 350F, even if the recipe says 375. That is the temperature that gives me the best crust and moist interior. I like a thin but crispy crust on my bread.

    I'm glad you are having some successes with your bread lately. Practice makes perfect, you know!

    I like thin and crispy crusts too for the most part. One of the recipes I've been using calls for 350 (Amish White Bread), and the other calls for 400French Bread Rolls to die for). Zaar is acting up or I would paste the recipes) I know that all ovens are different, so I'm just trying to get a good 'feel' for what mine is able to do.
    Gina


    French bread is normally cooked at a high temperature. The temperature will not determine the type of crust as much as what type of bread.

    Hmm... now I'm confused. I know the recipe is important, but I always thought the higher the temp, the crispier the crust.


    Yes, within reason. But different types of bread will have different crusts anyway.
    Donna M.
    Sun Feb 13, 2005 4:24 pm
    Forum Host
    Breads that contain some fat will not have as hard and thick a crust as those that don't, also. Sugar content will cause the crust to brown quicker. French loaves don't normally contain sugar or fat and that is why they can be baked at such a hot temperature without getting too brown.

    It probably all sounds confusing, but once you start to understand the different types of bread it starts to make sense.
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