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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Breads & Baking / Classes on Bread Making
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    Classes on Bread Making

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    Chipfo
    Sat Feb 12, 2005 5:30 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Donna M. wrote:
    Chip, the starters I use are wild yeast only. I don't use commercial yeast in my bread recipes, either. You don't need it if you have a good starter. I didn't make my own starters. I have four different ones at the moment and they are all old, well-established starters. When it comes to starters, the older they are the better they are. My favorite starter is the Red Sea and that is the one I usually share with people.

    I don't recommend that you try making your own wild yeast starter. It is not that easy to capture a strain of yeast that is strong enough to rise a loaf of bread. Until you get a feel for working with sourdough, it is best to use a proven and established starter.

    If you want to give it a try, let me know. I will be happy to send you some of my starter. All I need is a SASE from you. I can 'Zaar-mail you my address.

    Mean's class is going to be on Feb. 26. I hope you can join us then. He will be posting the details soon.


    Thanks Donna, I would like very much to get a hold of a well established starter such as yours, if Red sea is your fav then I would be honored. I don't currenty know anyone making sourdough so I would have to try making my own. Some of the recipes say use packaged yeast and let the mixture sit on the counter for 3 days or until soured, then refridgerate and feed/refresh it ever so often others use no yeast (or natural airborne/wild yeast) but take a bit longer. It would be like a science experiment to me, which I am usually good at but I would rather take the easy way out icon_smile.gif . I will keep an eye on my 'Zaar mail but no big hurry.

    Thanks again for the offer! Means class falls on a Saturday, I usually work but if not I will be here. I will read it reguardless if I am here at the time or not.
    Kim D.
    Tue Feb 15, 2005 5:46 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Donna M. wrote:
    Chef #178970 wrote:
    I would like to know how to get started on sour dough bread.


    I am planning on doing a class on sourdough bread probably sometime in March. Keep an eye out for it. In the meantime, if you would like to get started with a sourdough starter I would be happy to send you some of my starter if you send me a SASE. Let me know here if you are interested and I will send you a private message email through 'Zaar. You don't need to post your email address here, as 'Zaar will forward it to you.


    Hi Donna, I'd love to try some of your starter! Please e-mail me your mailing address and I'll send you a SASE! Thanks so much!!! icon_biggrin.gif
    Donna M.
    Tue Feb 15, 2005 9:19 pm
    Forum Host
    Hi Kim, I sent you an email. Looking forward to helping you get started with sourdough! ~Donna
    Chipfo
    Tue Feb 15, 2005 10:22 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I'm sorry Donna, I may have sent a mixed message with my last post, I would very much like to try your starter also. If you have already tried to contact me I haven't recieved it.

    I stated "No hurry" and I mean that. I am just posting again in case my last post was misunderstood icon_smile.gif . I do tend to ramble on at times.
    Donna M.
    Tue Feb 15, 2005 10:40 pm
    Forum Host
    OMG, Chip! icon_redface.gif I am so sorry--I could have sworn that I already emailed you my address. I just checked my sent messages folder and found out that I didn't. Email is on its way NOW--soon as I get it typed!

    The only explanation that I can give is that it must have been one of those nights that I worked the late shift and then checked the threads when I got home, read your post, thought "I'll do that in the morning" and then prompty spaced it out. Please accept my apologies.
    Heather Sullivan
    Wed Feb 16, 2005 8:28 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I don't know about classes but I'm willing to do some photo tutorials on dough shaping (per request in Q&A). I'm in the UK so most times I pick for a class would be wrong for USA people (or wrong for me) anyway...
    Donna M.
    Wed Feb 16, 2005 11:32 am
    Forum Host
    Heather, you could post photo tutorials at any time. People could then refer to them at their convenience and ask you questions in the thread. I would love to see some how-to photos posted.

    The only thing that bugs me about photo tutorials is the fact that after a period of time, the photos drop off into oblivion and are no longer there to view. I wish they could be permanent.
    Chipfo
    Wed Feb 16, 2005 10:21 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Donna M. wrote:
    OMG, Chip! icon_redface.gif I am so sorry--I could have sworn that I already emailed you my address. I just checked my sent messages folder and found out that I didn't. Email is on its way NOW--soon as I get it typed!

    The only explanation that I can give is that it must have been one of those nights that I worked the late shift and then checked the threads when I got home, read your post, thought "I'll do that in the morning" and then prompty spaced it out. Please accept my apologies.


    Thanks Donna, I recieved your email. icon_biggrin.gif
    CobraLimes
    Sat Mar 12, 2005 4:00 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Gina*S wrote:

    BTW, I just can NOT seem to aquire a taste for sourdough. Not sure why.


    Hi Gina,
    I had the same opinion about sourdough bread as you just expressed. I found it, well, sour/tart. The taste wasn't to my liking, but being an avid bread baker and seeing Donna and Carrol's information on wild yeast and their offer to send the flakes, I thought I'd give it the ol' college try. Welllllll, it ain't like any sourdough I've ever met. The flavor is subtle and absolutely fantastic. There's an added bonus to the texture of the bread and the sliceability (is that a word?). I've baked bread for 40 years and am still learning and this wild yeast venture has been incredible. My kitchen is beginning to look like a chemistry lab, but the results are well worth it. I'd strongly suggest giving it a try and letting the pros lead you through the process. I hope you have the same kind of success I have. Good luck! (I think I just hijacked this thread....apologies)
    Donna M.
    Wed Mar 16, 2005 10:46 am
    Forum Host
    Cobralimes, I am delighted to see that you are so excited about the sourdough. Too many people equate sourdough with the sour stuff that they buy in the grocery store. Some people love it that way, but others detest it. Commercial bakeries usually use additives to enhance the sourness. What most people don't realize is that all sourdoughs do not taste like that. In fact, most of them are very mild. They also impart a texture and crust like no commercial yeast bread will ever have.
    Wanna-be-Chef
    Thu Mar 17, 2005 6:05 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    What about Panini Bread? Exactly what is it? I had a Sandwich made with this Bread, and it was the "best". However, I cannot find a recipe for it, nor can I find it anywhere in the City I live in. Odd, I think!! Anyone I have asked, seems to have never heard of it, or, they will say it is a Frocaccia Bread? I have a tendency to disgree! This Bread was soft, flat, and ever so tasty!!
    Hope someone can help me - preferably with a Bread Maker recipe. I do not bake Bread from scratch!!
    Thank you so much!! icon_smile.gif By the way - I am a "newbie". How am I doing? icon_wink.gif
    CobraLimes
    Thu Mar 17, 2005 6:25 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Wanna-be-Chef wrote:
    What about Panini Bread? Exactly what is it? I had a Sandwich made with this Bread, and it was the "best". However, I cannot find a recipe for it, nor can I find it anywhere in the City I live in. Odd, I think!! Anyone I have asked, seems to have never heard of it, or, they will say it is a Frocaccia Bread? I have a tendency to disgree! This Bread was soft, flat, and ever so tasty!!
    Hope someone can help me - preferably with a Bread Maker recipe. I do not bake Bread from scratch!!
    Thank you so much!! icon_smile.gif By the way - I am a "newbie". How am I doing? icon_wink.gif


    You are doing great! And welcome to Recipezaar! icon_biggrin.gif

    Panini is actually Italian for little bread. The process of making a panini (little bread sandwich) is using a grill or press. You can use any bread for this purpose. What you probably had was a soft-textured focaccia bread. The easiest and most cost effective way of trying the panini is to use a grill pan (the kind with the lines in it that are often used for low-fat cooking), place your sandwich in, and put a plate (heatproof) on top with some sort of weight. When done on the bottom side simply flip the sandwich and repeat the process with the weight. One suggestion is to definitely try embarking on the world of breadbaking using your own dough. It's a much simpler process than you probably imagine and is worth the remarkable results. Flour, water, and yeast are all you really need along with some organizational skills to start. You can use your bread maker on the dough cycle and then take it out and form it for the second rise and then bake it in your conventional oven. There are many of us who are avid bread bakers and are more than willing to walk you through the process. Please try it out...you'll be pleasantly surprised at the results. I'll test the waters with my own experimentation of breads that might come close to what you're looking for if you could give me some more information regarding what you tasted in the bread you had in your panini. The bread shaping part shouldn't be that difficult to master. Hope this helps.
    CobraLimes
    Thu Mar 17, 2005 6:49 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    After posting the above message I found this recipe in hungrybrowser.com in the Uncle Phaedrus (consulting detective + finder of lost recipes) section. It's a highly seasoned bread that sounds similar to what I think you're looking for. You can place all of the ingredients in your bread machine according to the manufacturer's suggestions on the order of placement (don't let the salt and yeast come into initial contact). Put it on the dough cycle and when complete, proceed from where I've bolded the recipe. You can add the herbs into the machine if you prefer them inside the bread or add them later on top of the bread just prior to baking. I hope this works for you. I'll try it myself and let you know what I accomplish.

    "The aroma of garlic, herbs and baking bread will warm up your home when you
    make this focaccia, an Italian flatbread.

    1 (1/4-ounce) package active dry yeast or 2 1/2 teaspoons
    2 cups warm water, divided use
    5 cups all-purpose or bread flour
    1 teaspoon salt
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    12 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped
    2 teaspoons chopped fresh oregano
    2 teaspoons chopped fresh rosemary
    2 teaspoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
    1/2 teaspoon coarse salt
    In large bowl, dissolve yeast in 1/4 cup warm water (105F to 115F). Let
    stand 5 minutes until foamy. Add remaining water, flour and salt. Beat until
    dough forms.
    Turn dough out on a lightly floured surface and knead until elastic, about
    10 minutes. Place in oiled bowl, cover and let rise in warm place 1 hour or
    until doubled.

    From dough cycle in bread machine, proceed from this point:
    Punch dough down and knead a few times. Return to oiled bowl,
    cover and rise again until doubled, about 1 hour.
    Preheat oven to 400F. Lightly grease two baking sheets.
    After dough has risen the second time, press air out and divide in half. On
    a floured surface, roll each half into a 9 x12-inch rectangle. Place on
    prepared baking sheets and brush with olive oil. Scatter garlic, oregano,
    rosemary and parsley over surface of each and press lightly. Sprinkle with
    salt. Bake about 20 minutes or until golden. Serve warm.
    Makes 2 foccacia."
    CobraLimes
    Fri Mar 18, 2005 12:54 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I tried my altered version of the above recipe and posted the results. It's got great potential and is a very easy bread to put together.

    This is the link to the recipe that's waiting to be proofread and edited:


    Italian Garlic and Herb Seasoned Panini/Focaccia Bread (abm)

    http://www.recipezaar.com/members/subm/editr?sid=104455
    Wanna-be-Chef
    Fri Mar 18, 2005 8:08 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Thank you so much for your "Wonderful" reply! You know exactly what I was looking for. The Sandwich you described, was "right on". It was as though you were right there with me having the same sandwich!!
    I will definitely try the Recipe, and will let you know how I made out. I may have you over to my house for Lunch!! icon_wink.gif
    Thanks again, and have a great weekend!

    icon_lol.gif
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