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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Breads & Baking / Strategies for rising
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    Strategies for rising

    Gina*S
    Fri Feb 04, 2005 3:54 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I've decided to give my fast rising yeast one more chance before I chuck it. I'm going to make a french loaf today. So in an effort to give it every chance to do it's thing, how should I set things up?
    My kitchen isn't all that warm, but I do have a heater vent I could set it near. Or should I put it in a warmed oven? In the oven with a pan of hot water under it? Do I oil the resting dough? Cover it? I usually cover it with a kitchen towel, but I've heard mention of plastic wrap. I don't have any... can I use foil?
    Thanks! Gina
    Chipfo
    Fri Feb 04, 2005 7:28 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    If you feel like it is your yeast, have you tried testing it to make sure it is good? I would before just trying it in the dough. Dissolve 1 teaspoon of sugar in 1/2 cup of warm water and stir in 2 1/4 teaspoons (= 1 packet) of the yeast, within 10 or 15 minutes the mixture should froth up to at least the 1 cup mark and have a nice crown.

    As for rising the bread I usually bring water to a boil in the microwave in my Pyrex measuring cup and place the dough in to rise. I don't use my oven because it is gas and the pilot light may be too warm for it, too much heat will kill the yeast. I also have never tried foil to cover it, I use plastic wrap loosely. If I was to try foil (loosely wrapped) I would probably lightly oil one side just so the dough wouldn't stick to it if it came in contact.
    Gina*S
    Fri Feb 04, 2005 8:51 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Thank you for the info. I went ahead with the french loaf as planned, and it turned out edible. And if that's all I can say for it, then it's time for new yeast. No biggie. I will try your raising techniques (as well as the proofing method) when I get some new yeast, and unfortunately, more flour. icon_rolleyes.gif I will get this figured out yet!
    Kim D.
    Mon Feb 07, 2005 3:27 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I know I'm late, but I wanted to let you know what I do and it works great. I thought you might want to give it a try next time you make bread.... I place my bowl of dough that is rising on a heating pad (set on low) or if I have my dryer going, I place the covered bowl on top of the dryer. Works great! icon_biggrin.gif
    MEAN CHEF
    Mon Feb 07, 2005 3:37 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Gina*S wrote:
    I've decided to give my fast rising yeast one more chance before I chuck it. I'm going to make a french loaf today. So in an effort to give it every chance to do it's thing, how should I set things up?
    My kitchen isn't all that warm, but I do have a heater vent I could set it near. Or should I put it in a warmed oven? In the oven with a pan of hot water under it? Do I oil the resting dough? Cover it? I usually cover it with a kitchen towel, but I've heard mention of plastic wrap. I don't have any... can I use foil?
    Thanks! Gina


    Rapid rise yeast is generally used only for one rise dough, like in a bread machine.

    The temperature of your environment only impacts rising time.

    What you cover it with matters little.
    Gina*S
    Mon Feb 07, 2005 9:21 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Thanks everyone. I am learning SO much in this forum!! I did get some new yeast, BEFORE I read that rapid rise was general for single rise breads. Anyway, I successfully made a garlic herb bread! Next time I'm out I'll pick up some regular yeast and give it another go. Two questions:
    1. Am I correct in thinking that bread will rise, just more slowly in a cold environment? and
    2: Any word yet on a bread baking class?
    You all are fabulous teachers.
    P.S. I LOVE the dryer idea, and would do it if my laundry machines weren't out on my fridged back porch. icon_rolleyes.gif Gotta love these old houses!
    MEAN CHEF
    Mon Feb 07, 2005 11:45 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    yes it rises more slowly in a cool environment.
    UnknownChef86
    Sat Feb 12, 2005 12:16 am
    Forum Host
    Gina*S wrote:
    Thanks everyone. I am learning SO much in this forum!! I did get some new yeast, BEFORE I read that rapid rise was general for single rise breads. Anyway, I successfully made a garlic herb bread! Next time I'm out I'll pick up some regular yeast and give it another go. Two questions:
    1. Am I correct in thinking that bread will rise, just more slowly in a cold environment? and
    2: Any word yet on a bread baking class?
    You all are fabulous teachers.
    P.S. I LOVE the dryer idea, and would do it if my laundry machines weren't out on my fridged back porch. icon_rolleyes.gif Gotta love these old houses!

    Gina,
    Here is a good-looking recipe for a Fresh Baguette. I added a few hints in my review, also. Re. fast-rising yeast: I'm sure it has it's purpose, but I don't ever use it. What you make up in time, many times you lose in flavor and quality. I use at least two risings for all of my dough recipes, and that doesn't include the final rise in the pan. It takes longer, but you wind up with a better product in the end. If time is a serious factor, you might want to see about using cold water for the dough, then letting it rise in the fridge. That way, you can extend the rising time overnight or while you're at work.

    PS: I like the dryer idea too! I might use that for my roll recipe. icon_wink.gif
    AKillian24
    Sun Feb 13, 2005 8:21 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I'm still learning as well - but if I'm in a pinch I'll turn my oven on low for 10-20 minutes, crack the door and turn it off until it's ;just warm' and then plop the loaf in to rise.
    Dienia B.
    Mon Mar 07, 2005 2:23 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    start the yeast aheaed of time helps it rise faster in a cooler place ***mine is cold ** i use honey in place of sugar the yeast likes that too a towel wetted iwth hot water helps and a little oil or butter on top helps cause it takes longer to rise and you dont want a hard crust (been there done that)
    AKillian24
    Wed Mar 09, 2005 5:36 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    FYI- I've recently discovered that Fast-Rise yeast just doesn't work as well for me. (Particularly in WW recipes). I'm back to the regular stuff.....
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