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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Breads & Baking / Bread machines -- pros and cons
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    Bread machines -- pros and cons

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    MEAN CHEF
    Mon Jan 31, 2005 3:03 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    KelleyMcCoy wrote:
    We love bread but I've never had a bread machine. Good bread from the local bakery is pretty inexpensive but I'm sort of lusting after a bread machine. Are they easy to use, easy to clean, worth the expense??? Do you have to use yeast a lot. For some reason i'm afraid of yeast. icon_smile.gif Thanks.


    I think the answer is if you are serious about making bread, you don't want a bread machine. They are far too limiting and do not produce a product near as good as you can by hand.
    CarrolJ
    Mon Jan 31, 2005 3:13 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Morti wrote:
    I have one, but don't use it that often. The bread seems very dense and often dry if you don't eat it right away and it doesn't keep well. Any suggestions?


    Change to making a wild yeast sourdough bread...they are more moist and last longer. See: the wild yeast sourdough thread under the new bread section.
    jaynine
    Mon Jan 31, 2005 4:26 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I love my bread machine. I sometimes use my own ingredients, and sometimes use the ready-made mixes that come in a box, depending on my laziness factor. You can cook the whole thing in the machine, or use the machine to do the mixing and kneading for you (dough cycle), then let it rise and cook it in the oven. Don't be afraid of yeast, it's just another ingredient. The bread doesn't last as long as store-bought bread, because it doesn't have the preservatives in it, but it tastes better.
    But the BEST thing about it is being able to time delay it and coming home from work to that smell of fresh-baked bread; it will make the stress of your day melt away! icon_biggrin.gif
    Roxygirl in Colorado
    Tue Feb 01, 2005 11:11 am
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    I love my machine. It makes such a better dough than I was able to do by hand. I used to have flour all over the kitchen when I did it by hand. This way every bit of the mess stays in the machine. I mostly use the Dough Only process in my machine. The dough comes out so perfect that I love to hand shape it and it truly is homemade.

    Roxygirl inColo.
    CarrolJ
    Tue Feb 01, 2005 11:17 am
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    Roxygirl in Colorado wrote:
    I love my machine. It makes such a better dough than I was able to do by hand. I used to have flour all over the kitchen when I did it by hand. This way every bit of the mess stays in the machine. I mostly use the Dough Only process in my machine. The dough comes out so perfect that I love to hand shape it and it truly is homemade.

    Roxygirl inColo.


    I couldn't agree more! You said it very well.
    Heather Sullivan
    Tue Feb 01, 2005 11:54 am
    Food.com Groupie

    Thank you for posting this, now I know I'm definately not a breadmachine person and I won't dream of putting it on my endless list of "gadgets I will get when I get a bigger kitchen" icon_wink.gif
    CarrolJ
    Tue Feb 01, 2005 11:59 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Heather Sullivan wrote:

    Thank you for posting this, now I know I'm definately not a breadmachine person and I won't dream of putting it on my endless list of "gadgets I will get when I get a bigger kitchen" icon_wink.gif


    I read this article...and would have qualified according to it as if I was NOT a bread machine person. And yet I own 2 machines and love them. I wouldn't be without one in my kitchen. So not everything that some person writes about qualifies as a person who might enjoy having such a machine. Some of us just don't fit into the 'mold' that some people want to put us into.

    I should say that I use the machines for making the dough...and I love using it that way!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    CobraLimes
    Tue Feb 01, 2005 12:43 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I've been converted. I was a bread snob until I came onto this site. I bought a bread machine back in 1993 when they were all the rage and used it a few times until I realized I was happier with the loaves I made by hand. It sat in my garage for all these years and then I found Recipezaar's bread mavens and decided to give it another try. It's a sensational machine for making dough. The ease of dumping in ingredients, letting the machine do the manual labor, having the proper temperature and timing for perfect rising, and rendering a beautiful dough is what it's all about. I have surrendered my purist philosophy and my breadmaker now sits proudly on my counter along with the other essential tools (Kitchenaid mixer and Cuisinart processor) in my kitchen that are used daily. One point that needs mentioning is that I don't ever bake the bread in the breadmaker. I always hand shape and use my oven.
    CarrolJ
    Tue Feb 01, 2005 1:01 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    cobralimes wrote:
    I've been converted. I was a bread snob until I came onto this site. I bought a bread machine back in 1993 when they were all the rage and used it a few times until I realized I was happier with the loaves I made by hand. It sat in my garage for all these years and then I found Recipezaar's bread mavens and decided to give it another try. It's a sensational machine for making dough. The ease of dumping in ingredients, letting the machine do the manual labor, having the proper temperature and timing for perfect rising, and rendering a beautiful dough is what it's all about. I have surrendered my purist philosophy and my breadmaker now sits proudly on my counter along with the other essential tools (Kitchenaid mixer and Cuisinart processor) in my kitchen that are used daily. One point that needs mentioning is that I don't ever bake the bread in the breadmaker. I always hand shape and use my oven.


    Thanks Cobralimes! I think most of us do the same and for the very same reasons!
    sophonisba
    Tue Feb 01, 2005 1:42 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Hand made bread is excellent because you can judge whether your dough is too dry or insufficiently elastic. As a veteran breadmaker I have to say it's also very therapeutic.
    Don't be scared, it just needs practice.
    Leominster Lee
    Tue Feb 01, 2005 2:14 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    I use a bread machine for dough. I always ck my dough ball to see if it is just right. Even though I measure carefully and really use the same recipes most of the time, humidity and other weather conditions can impact the dough.

    When I was young and carefree icon_biggrin.gif I made bread by hand. But now that I have a large family and many demands on my time (a full time job and a part time job) I use the bread machine for the dough feature. Then I take the dough out and shape and bake. (usually around 10 p.m. the smell of fresh bread is wafting through my house!!) We use a white bread with a smide of ww flour added for our regular toast. I also make a lovely cinnamon raisen bread, cinnnamon rolls, regular dinner rolls, and our own hot dog and hamburger buns. I also do our pizza dough in the machine.

    Lee
    CarrolJ
    Tue Feb 01, 2005 2:54 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Leominster Lee wrote:
    I use a bread machine for dough. I always ck my dough ball to see if it is just right. Even though I measure carefully and really use the same recipes most of the time, humidity and other weather conditions can impact the dough.

    When I was young and carefree icon_biggrin.gif I made bread by hand. But now that I have a large family and many demands on my time (a full time job and a part time job) I use the bread machine for the dough feature. Then I take the dough out and shape and bake. (usually around 10 p.m. the smell of fresh bread is wafting through my house!!) We use a white bread with a smide of ww flour added for our regular toast. I also make a lovely cinnamon raisen bread, cinnnamon rolls, regular dinner rolls, and our own hot dog and hamburger buns. I also do our pizza dough in the machine.

    Lee


    I also make adjustments according to the texture of the dough and the elasticity...in the machine. If it needs more kneading I simply reset it and then take it out after the kneading has stopped. It is easy to hear when it stops. Some of us never had the strength to knead properly by hand. I never had a successful homemade loaf of raised bread until I used a bread machine. For those of you who have lots of success without one, don't care about the mess, and have lots of time...good for you! For the rest of us who don't qualify in one or more of these qualifications...bread machines are the greatest thing invented since the wheel.

    My family sure thinks it is great. And I am having a ball creating them! I think that bread machines have brought back an art (bread making) which had almost ceased among the masses. And there is one thing that all of us can agree on whether we use a machine partially or make it entirely with our own hands...there is nothing which tastes as great as a loaf of fresh bread baked at home.
    Kycook
    Tue Feb 01, 2005 5:08 pm
    Semi-Experienced "Sous Chef" Poster
    Tracy,
    I would LOVE to take you up on that! Do you still have it?
    I tried to send you a private message but the system wouldn't let me since I'm not a premium member.

    Either way - very generous of you. icon_smile.gif

    jsgill@henderson.net
    Zewbiedoo
    Thu Feb 03, 2005 3:34 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Morti wrote:
    I have one, but don't use it that often. The bread seems very dense and often dry if you don't eat it right away and it doesn't keep well. Any suggestions?

    To get a higher, better textured loaf, use the dough cycle, then pat the dough out into a rectangle, and then roll tightly (to avoid air pockets) up into a log, tuck the ends under to fit in a regular bread pan, and bake in your regular oven at 350 for about 30 minutes. Keep in a sealed breadbag or ziplock bag.

    Bread never lasts long around my house but I have heard that adding potato water or potato flakes to the dough will help it keep longer. Perhaps someone else can expand on that.
    CarrolJ
    Thu Feb 03, 2005 3:45 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Zewbiedoo wrote:
    Morti wrote:
    I have one, but don't use it that often. The bread seems very dense and often dry if you don't eat it right away and it doesn't keep well. Any suggestions?

    To get a higher, better textured loaf, use the dough cycle, then pat the dough out into a rectangle, and then roll tightly (to avoid air pockets) up into a log, tuck the ends under to fit in a regular bread pan, and bake in your regular oven at 350 for about 30 minutes. Keep in a sealed breadbag or ziplock bag.

    Bread never lasts long around my house but I have heard that adding potato water or potato flakes to the dough will help it keep longer. Perhaps someone else can expand on that.


    Dear Zewbiedoo;

    You didn't tell her to let it raise to double it's size before baking. You meant to didn't you. If she doesn't let it raise it will be too dense.
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