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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Australian/New Zealand Cooking / Australian Cooking Terms
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    Australian Cooking Terms

    Go to page << Previous Page  1, 2, 3 ... 9, 10, 11, 12, 13  Next Page >>
    I'mPat
    Mon Mar 24, 2008 4:17 am
    Forum Host
    Thank you for your reply auzzi. Up to now I've used dark for bittersweet and milk for sweet and white when specified. Usually make for the DH or the DS's recreation group, so leave them to taste test, suppose I was really wondering if it made a huge difference. On the rare occassion I have chocolate I prefer the bitter ones (the higher the cocoa the better).

    Pat
    Tisme
    Mon Mar 24, 2008 5:12 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Very interesting.....see you are never too old too learn! icon_wink.gif
    Well done auzzie! icon_biggrin.gif


    Photobucket
    BILBY FOUND!


    Last edited by Tisme on Tue Mar 27, 2012 8:57 am, edited 4 times in total
    **Jubes**
    Mon Mar 24, 2008 6:02 am
    Forum Host
    Just came up in the Gluten-free forum that US and Canadians are unsure of the type of cheese we refer to when we say to use 'Tasty' cheese.

    Canadians refer to tasty cheese as any strong flavourful cheese.
    I'mPat
    Mon Mar 24, 2008 6:14 am
    Forum Host
    **Jubes** wrote:
    Just came up in the Gluten-free forum that US and Canadians are unsure of the type of cheese we refer to when we say to use 'Tasty' cheese.

    Canadians refer to tasty cheese as any strong flavourful cheese.


    The general acceptance is a cheddar style of cheese.

    Pat
    auzzi
    Mon Mar 24, 2008 8:52 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    general rule of thumb ..

    Australian Cheese - usually a cheddar-style
    * Mild cheese is matured for three months
    * Tasty cheese - up to nine months
    * Vintage cheese - 15 to 24 months

    American Cheddars
    Mild Cheddar - one to two months
    Sharp Cheddar - five to eight months
    Extra Sharp Cheddar - over a year
    Amanda in Adelaide
    Mon Mar 24, 2008 9:49 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Chef Potts wrote:
    Thank you for your reply auzzi. Up to now I've used dark for bittersweet and milk for sweet and white when specified. Usually make for the DH or the DS's recreation group, so leave them to taste test, suppose I was really wondering if it made a huge difference. On the rare occassion I have chocolate I prefer the bitter ones (the higher the cocoa the better).

    Pat



    Hi Pat,
    I have found that whenever a recipe calls for dark or cooking chocolate, it is well worth spending the extra few dollars and buying Valhrona or Callebut. The difference is just amazing! icon_surprised.gif
    I'mPat
    Mon Mar 24, 2008 10:12 pm
    Forum Host
    Amanda in Adelaide wrote:
    Chef Potts wrote:
    Thank you for your reply auzzi. Up to now I've used dark for bittersweet and milk for sweet and white when specified. Usually make for the DH or the DS's recreation group, so leave them to taste test, suppose I was really wondering if it made a huge difference. On the rare occassion I have chocolate I prefer the bitter ones (the higher the cocoa the better).

    Pat



    Hi Pat,
    I have found that whenever a recipe calls for dark or cooking chocolate, it is well worth spending the extra few dollars and buying Valhrona or Callebut. The difference is just amazing! icon_surprised.gif


    Hi Amanda

    Where do you buy it, I never heard of it and I'm thinking of trying a chocolate mud cake recipe out of Aprils Super Food Ideas next week - looks absolutely wicked and between the cake and the icing I will need 400 grams, so what sort of cost would I be looking at.

    Pat
    **Jubes**
    Mon Mar 24, 2008 10:16 pm
    Forum Host
    auzzi wrote:
    general rule of thumb ..

    Australian Cheese - usually a cheddar-style
    * Mild cheese is matured for three months
    * Tasty cheese - up to nine months
    * Vintage cheese - 15 to 24 months

    American Cheddars
    Mild Cheddar - one to two months
    Sharp Cheddar - five to eight months
    Extra Sharp Cheddar - over a year


    Thanks auzzi- that's great info.
    It really helps to see a comparison. I'm heading back to the gluten-free forum to copy and paste in your info icon_biggrin.gif
    Amanda in Adelaide
    Mon Mar 24, 2008 11:05 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Chef Potts wrote:
    Amanda in Adelaide wrote:
    Chef Potts wrote:
    Thank you for your reply auzzi. Up to now I've used dark for bittersweet and milk for sweet and white when specified. Usually make for the DH or the DS's recreation group, so leave them to taste test, suppose I was really wondering if it made a huge difference. On the rare occassion I have chocolate I prefer the bitter ones (the higher the cocoa the better).

    Pat



    Hi Pat,
    I have found that whenever a recipe calls for dark or cooking chocolate, it is well worth spending the extra few dollars and buying Valhrona or Callebut. The difference is just amazing! icon_surprised.gif


    Hi Amanda

    Where do you buy it, I never heard of it and I'm thinking of trying a chocolate mud cake recipe out of Aprils Super Food Ideas next week - looks absolutely wicked and between the cake and the icing I will need 400 grams, so what sort of cost would I be looking at.

    Pat


    Pat, I usually get it (or Callebut) at gourmet food shops or the better continental deli's. It is also available here at the Central Market. I honestly can't remember how much it costs, but it is significantly dearer than the supermarket stuff.
    I discovered the difference ages ago when I promised my best friend a proper mud cake for her birthday dinner. Because it was to be served at the actual dinner party, I did a 'dry run' with Cadbury Bourneville cocoa first the week before, and then made the real one with Valhrona. I was absolutely gobsmacked with the difference and have been converted ever since (although, not when I'm making stuff for the kids!!).
    I'mPat
    Mon Mar 31, 2008 6:15 am
    Forum Host
    Leggy Peggy just alerted me to a new one (never hear before)

    We say Hundreds and thousand and the yanks say

    non-pariels

    Pat
    JustJanS
    Mon Mar 31, 2008 6:18 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I've heard the term, but I always thought it was the long (rather than round hundreds and thousands) coloured sugary thingies.
    I'mPat
    Mon Mar 31, 2008 6:23 am
    Forum Host
    Did a google search (don't you love it) and got this

    https://www.ladyfortunes.com/Articles.asp?ID=159

    Pat
    JustJanS
    Mon Mar 31, 2008 7:58 am
    Food.com Groupie
    rotfl.gif

    I was obviously thinking of decorettes but I didn't know it icon_wink.gif
    I'mPat
    Mon Mar 31, 2008 8:13 am
    Forum Host
    JustJanS wrote:
    rotfl.gif

    I was obviously thinking of decorettes but I didn't know it icon_wink.gif


    But don't you just love some of the shapes and colours - can you imagine in the future using them to decorate a grandson's birthday cake icon_wink.gif icon_razz.gif icon_lol.gif
    JustJanS
    Mon Mar 31, 2008 8:43 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Maybe we should organise an Aussie/NZ/US non-pariels swap. Wouldn't they get the wrong end of that one icon_wink.gif
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