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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Australian/New Zealand Cooking / Australian Cooking Terms
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    Australian Cooking Terms

    Go to page 1, 2, 3 ... 11, 12, 13  Next Page >>
    JustJanS
    Sun Jan 23, 2005 2:11 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I just started this list using Sackville Girl's British one for inspiration. If you can think of anything to include, let me know. If you NZer's give me a list, I'll do the same for you. EG chilly bin = esky icon_wink.gif

    Australian terms on the left, US on the right
    27-30g = 1 square of chocolate
    125g butter = stick = 1/2 cup

    baking tray = cookie sheet
    barbecue = grill
    beef olives = rouladen
    beetroot = beet
    bi-carb soda = baking soda
    biscuit = cracker or cookie
    bottling = canning
    bread rolls = buns
    broad bean = fava bean

    cake cooler = wire rack
    cake tin = pan
    capsicum = bell pepper
    casserole dinner (or tea) = potluck
    caster sugar = superfine granulated
    celery stick = celery rib
    chick peas = garbanzos
    chicken pieces = chicken parts
    chips = french fries or crisps
    coconut, desiccated (unsweetened) = coconut, shredded (often sweetened)
    copha = white vegetable shortening
    coriander (leaves) = cilantro
    corn flour = corn starch
    cos = romaine lettuce
    cream, whipping (37% fat) = cream, heavy/heavy whipping (min 36% fat)

    demerara = sugar light brown cane sugar
    dressing = mayonaise or viniagrette
    dripping = fat from roasted meat

    endive = chicory
    entree = the course preceding the main course
    essence = extract
    evaporated milk - Pet Milk(brand name)

    fairy bread = bread and butter with coloured sprinkles
    fairy cake = cupcake
    fairy floss = cotton candy
    fillet (of meat) = tenderloin
    french bean = green bean
    frying pan = skillet

    ginger nut = ginger snap
    glacé = candied
    glad bake = parchment paper
    glad wrap = saran wrap or plastic wrap
    golden syrup = similar to light corn syrup
    greaseproof paper = wax paper
    grill = broil

    hundred and thousands = sprinkles

    icing = frosting
    icing sugar = confectioners' sugar, powdered sugar

    jacket potato = baked potato
    jam = jelly
    jelly = jell-o
    jelly crystals = flavoured gelatin
    joint (of meat) = large cut of meat with bone

    kitchen paper = paper towel

    lolly = candy

    maltesers = chocolate covered malt balls
    Marie biscuits = vanilla wafers (any plain sweet biscuit will do!)
    mince = ground meat
    mixed peel = candied peel

    offal = variety meats (liver, heart, kidney)
    omelette = omelet
    oven slide = cookie sheet

    pasta sauce (jarred) = tomato sauce
    pastie = meat turnover
    pastry case = pie shell
    patty cake = cup cake
    pawpaw = papaya
    pepper/capsicum = bell pepper
    pig’s trotter = pig’s foot
    pips = seeds
    plain flour = all purpose flour
    porridge = cooked oatmeal
    prawns = shrimp
    pudding = dessert

    rasher = slice (most often used in terms of bacon)
    rice bubbles = rice crispies (breakfast cereal)
    ring tin = tube pan
    rocket = argula
    rockmelon = cantaloupe
    roast = baked
    rump steak = sirloin

    saladas = saltines
    self raising flour = all-purpose flour with baking powder
    semolina = farina
    shandy = beer with sprite
    sherbert = powdered candy
    silverbeet = Swiss chard
    silverside = beef cut from the rump
    skirt steak = flank steak
    slice = bar
    soft drink = soda
    southern biscuits = scones
    spring onion = scallion/green onion
    sponge finger = lady finger
    stock cubes = boullion Cubes
    stoned = seeded
    stuffing = dressing
    sultanas = golden raisins
    swiss roll tin = jelly roll pan
    swede = turnip or rutebaga

    tea towel = dish towel
    toffee = taffy
    tomato sauce = ketchup
    treacle = similar to molasses

    vermicelli, chocolate = sprinkles, chocolate


    Last edited by JustJanS on Wed Jan 04, 2006 5:45 am, edited 10 times in total
    Ilysse
    Wed Jan 26, 2005 8:43 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Hi Jan, some of these are really helpful, thank you.

    I really am enjoying the Australian dishes here. I've never really looked into Australian cooking b4 but I love it now. I'm even eating Vegemite sandwiches lol (actually Marrmite is the only thing I could find around here).

    I have been running into something alot in the recipes posted mostly by Australians that I hope you can help me with. Many call for a "tasty cheese". I have understood this, in some recipes, to be a cheddar or cheddar like cheese, but I was wondering if maybe there is an Australian cheese that I should be looking for or should I just wing it and understand that to mean I should use what I like?

    Ok, so I never said it was going to be a good question, but some of these recipes look really good, regardless of the cheese, but I would hate to use the wrong stuff. How can I review something without using what the poster intended.

    Thanks for your help.
    JustJanS
    Wed Jan 26, 2005 9:00 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Hi and welcome Illyse. Tasty cheese is a cheddar style cheese, we can buy it from mild to extremely sharp (extra vintage tasty) and it's very popular in Australia. I personally would use whatever hard, well flavoured cheese I could get if cheddar is difficult to find.
    Of course you can review still, I find it a help for other people in the same situation if you tell about your substutuions icon_biggrin.gif
    Ilysse
    Wed Jan 26, 2005 9:19 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Thank you so much, I feel better now icon_biggrin.gif
    Cheddar is easy, you should have seen me asking for vegimite icon_lol.gif .

    I just ment if I had used, say, blue cheese in place of the tasty cheese called for and it was really bad, it would not seem fare to me to leave a bad review since I didn't use, at least, a close relative of the cheese. There is a big difference between cheddar and blue but subing american wouldn't be so bad. If its good then who cares icon_wink.gif

    Now that I have confused every one. Thanks again icon_biggrin.gif
    Stella Mae
    Fri Jan 28, 2005 4:30 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Thanks for this list! Caster sugar is one I was not sure about, and now I know I can come here when I run into trouble with some recipes my New Zealand friend in Brisbane gives me.
    Chef #178115
    Fri Jan 28, 2005 4:48 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    this helped me a lot as I was having trouble with the American terms. icon_redface.gif
    could anyone tell me what is Bisquick and also Knox herb soup mix. icon_cry.gif
    mummamills
    Fri Jan 28, 2005 4:49 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I have a daughter in Philly,
    I didnt realise how different a language she had to put up with icon_eek.gif
    mummamills
    Fri Jan 28, 2005 4:51 am
    Food.com Groupie
    I can help icon_smile.gif
    bisquick is a biscuit mix like our bakeo
    there are a few recipes here, so you can make your own.
    Stella Mae
    Fri Jan 28, 2005 6:12 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Bisquick -- it means "quick bisquits" -- is a packaged mix in a box, a short cut since the mix contains yeast and baking powder -- sort of no fail when you're in a hurry. Bisquick makes a good pizza crust, etc., and very nice biscuits. Here's a homemade recipe for biscuits -- what you might call a damper. Southern Biscuits are light and fluffy rolls, usually eaten for breakfast but good anytime.

    Knox soup mix I'm not familiar with. Do you mean Knox gelatin (plain gelatin, no flavor) or Knorr soup mix? If there is such a thing as Knox soup mix, it'd be on the order of Knorr, packages you can open and pour into a mug and add hot water. Good!
    Chef #178115
    Fri Jan 28, 2005 9:23 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    thank you mummamills & stellaMae thats helps me out, can work from ther now icon_lol.gif
    Stephen Dunne
    Sun Jan 30, 2005 2:29 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    so they're exactly the same as british then??
    why create ? icon_sad.gif
    JustJanS
    Sun Jan 30, 2005 3:56 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Stephen Dunne wrote:
    so they're exactly the same as british then??
    why create ? icon_sad.gif
    Welcome to Austalian/New Zealand cooking Stepehen.
    I used the British list as inspiration, but there are different terms still for the same words with in both lists.
    oriana
    Tue Feb 01, 2005 11:30 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    ok i don't think I saw this on the list but is shortening their term for margarine as I always think of the vegetable shortening Copha but I'm sure that isn't what they use in some of these recipes or it would be gross!
    Daydream
    Wed Feb 02, 2005 12:15 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Jan, here are some more to add to your list:

    cake cooler = wire rack
    celery stick = celery rib
    coconut, desiccated (unsweetened) = coconut, shredded (often sweetened)
    copha = white vegetable shortening
    cream, whipping (37% fat) = cream, heavy/heavy whipping (min 36% fat)
    dripping = fat from roasted meat
    fairy bread = bread and butter with colored sprinkles
    fillet (of meat) = tenderloin
    frying pan = skillet
    ginger nut = ginger snap
    glad wrap - also = saran wrap
    hundreds and thousands = colored sprinkles
    icing = frosting
    jelly = jell-o
    joint (of meat) = large cut of meat with bone
    kitchen paper = paper towel
    lamington tin = 13" x 9" x 2" pan
    oven slide = cookie sheet
    pastie = meat turnover
    pastry case = pie shell
    pawpaw = papaya
    pig’s trotter = pig’s foot
    porridge = cooked oatmeal
    pudding = dessert
    ring tin = tube pan
    rockmelon = cantaloupe
    rump steak = sirloin
    semolina = farina
    sherbert = powdered candy
    silverbeet = Swiss chard
    silverside = beef cut from the rump
    skirt steak = flank steak
    southern biscuits = scones
    sponge finger = lady finger
    stock cubes = boullion Cubes
    swiss roll tin = jelly roll pan
    tea towel = dish towel
    toffey = taffy
    vermicelli, chocolate = sprinkles, chocolate


    Last edited by Daydream on Wed Feb 02, 2005 3:44 am, edited 3 times in total
    JustJanS
    Wed Feb 02, 2005 12:35 am
    Food.com Groupie
    Daydream wrote:
    Jan, here is some more to add to your list icon_wink.gif

    bream = sole
    *sole is a flat fish, bream swims upright-look quite different in Vic

    cream, whipping = cream, light/half-and-half
    * I always thought whipping and heavy were the same, half and half like light cream

    glace cherries = maraschino cherries
    *glace are in a sticky syrup marachino are in a thin runny liquid

    jew/dhu fish = halibut
    dhu is an upright swimming fish, halibut a big flat fish

    ring tin = tube pan
    *I'm imagining a tube pan is what I would cook a date roll in

    rump steak = sirloin
    *Rump is from the rear, sirloin is cut from the ribs in Vic. It's waht we used to call porterhouse.


    vermicelli, chocolate = sprinkles, chocolate

    *I've never heard it called chocolate vermicilli


    Thanks for those Wendy, and please don't think I'm being precious icon_wink.gif but there's a few I'm not sure on, I'll list them here. It might be a WA/Vic thing icon_biggrin.gif If anypne can help us, I'd appreciate it as I'd hate to list the wrong things there
    Go to page 1, 2, 3 ... 11, 12, 13  Next Page >> E-mail me when someone replies to this
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