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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Breads & Baking / KitchenAid instructions and recipe booklet breads
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    KitchenAid instructions and recipe booklet breads

    Sandaidh
    Sat Jan 22, 2005 12:55 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I'm doing my second bread recipe from the instructions and recipe booklet which came with my KitchenAid mixer. For the second time, I'm finding that I have to add more water than the recipe specifies. Not much, maybe a tablespoon or two, but enough to know I'm having to do it. Both recipes also said all the kneading took place in bowl but I've found I have to knead it by hand to make it come out right. Any ideas why this would be happening? Is it just that I'm new to having a KitchenAid mixer, different kitchen climates, or...?

    The first I made was Herb Garlic Baguettes. This one is french bread. If it comes out good (no reason it shouldn't. icon_wink.gif ) then I'm looking forward to adding your sourdough starter to it.
    Heather Sullivan
    Sat Jan 22, 2005 2:06 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Are you using your dough hook and timing the kneading time from the time it comes together into a dough? It sounds like you may not be giving the machine enough time to bring it all together, maybe...
    CobraLimes
    Sat Jan 22, 2005 4:29 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Humidity, type of flour, temperature in your kitchen, etc. are all factors to take into consideration when preparing bread dough. The more you handle dough, the more you'll get a 'feel' for it. Adding a bit more or less flour or water is normal. Stick with it and trust your judgment and you'll be a pro in no time. As long as you don't kill the yeast by adding too hot a liquid, you should do fine. Welcome to the world of Kitchenaid (that dough hook is such a cool invention) and to breadmaking.
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