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    German Recipes

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    Tasty Tidbits
    Sat Jan 22, 2005 8:31 am
    Forum Host
    I bought several cookbooks when we were in Germany last summer which was very bold of me since I can't speak German. But the pictures looked delicious and I love German food! Do you think you could help me with some of the ingredient translations etc. from time to time so I could use them?
    Anke R
    Sat Jan 22, 2005 8:42 am
    Food.com Groupie
    MarieAlice wrote:
    I bought several cookbooks when we were in Germany last summer which was very bold of me since I can't speak German. But the pictures looked delicious and I love German food! Do you think you could help me with some of the ingredient translations etc. from time to time so I could use them?
    Sure no problem. Which one did you buy? Regional cooking or more general? I have a few recipes posted as well and will be posting some more. Unless there is a proper translation available, I tend to keep the German name. I have also reviewed or commented on recipes on zaar that I was about to post and that were either similar or the same as mine. I also commented on a few that claim to be authentic and sth that can be found everywhere in Germany, when I , being German and having travelled to many places, hadn't heard of it. So just ask your questions and I'm sure you will find your answers here.
    -Sylvie-
    Sat Jan 22, 2005 9:03 am
    Food.com Groupie
    MarieAlice, if Anke isn't about I'm also happy to help. Just post them here or e-mail me and I'll se what I can do!

    Many a times when peole have asked for German recipes in the Request a Recipe forum and there wasn't one on Zaar I got it from another (German) website and translated it, so it shouldn't be too much of a problem. The only thing I always seam to struggle with are the slightly more obscure cuts of meat.
    HeatherFeather
    Sat Jan 22, 2005 5:45 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Absolutely! Go ahead and post the recipe in the message here, then we can all help you translate and then you can test it out and post it in English on Zaar. icon_smile.gif
    Tasty Tidbits
    Sun Jan 23, 2005 4:23 am
    Forum Host
    Ok, here is the first one. The only ingredient I haven't been able to figure out from this one is Knoblauchzehen, also am a bit confused as to what EL is, and the instructions . Thanks!

    Makkaroni mit Gorgonzola Walnuss-SoBe

    4 portionen/Zubereitung: 25 minuten/Insgesamt: 25 minuten

    Am Ende eines ganz, ganz miesen Tages - und solche givt es ja immer mal wieder - spendet dieses Essen schnellen und zuverlassigen Trost.

    Zutaten:
    300g Makkaroni
    Salz
    100g Schalotten
    2 Knoblauchzehen
    100g Rauke
    300g Gorgonzola-kase
    60g Walnusskerne
    1 EL Walnussol
    1/4 l milch
    frisch gemahlener Pfeffer
    einige Veilchen-Bluten

    1. Makkaroni in reichlich kochendern Salzwasser nach Packungsanweisun bissfest kochen.
    2. Inzwischen Schalotten und Knoblauchzehen abziehen und fein wurfein.
    3. Rauke abspulen, trocken schuttein und etwas klein zupfen.
    4. Den Gorgonzola-Kase in kleine Wurfel schneiden. Walnusse grob hacken.
    5. Schalotten wirfel in heiBerm Ol glasig dunsten. Knoblauch, Gorgonsola-Kase und Milk zugeben und unter Ruhren erhitzen, bis der Kase geschmolzen ist.
    6. Die Walnusse und Rauke unterruhren und mit Salz un Pfeffer wirzen.
    7. Die Makkaroni in ein Sieb gieBen und abtropfen lassen.
    8. Unter die SoBe mischen und mit Veilchen-Bluten garnieren.
    -Sylvie-
    Sun Jan 23, 2005 5:14 am
    Food.com Groupie
    MarieAlice,

    hope this helps. Sounds like a great recipe I hope you'll post it! Knoblauchzehen is cloves of garlic and EL is the abreviation for Tablespoon. Just to add TL is teaspoon.

    Makkoroni with Gorgonzola and Walnut Sauce

    Serves 4, preparation time 25 minutes, Alltogether cooking time 25 minutes

    Ingredients:
    300g maccaroni
    salt
    100g shallots
    2 cloves of garlic
    100g rocket (arugula), (which I know under the name Rukola (sp) rather than Rauke)
    300g Gorgonzola
    60g walnuts halves
    1 Tbsp Walnut oil
    1/4 litre milk
    freshly ground pepper
    a couple of viola blossoms

    1. Cook maccoroni al dente
    2. Peel and finely chop the shalots and garlic.
    3. Wash and dry the rocket and tear up into slightly smaller pieces (Sorry this is worded a bit odd, but you know what I mean.)
    4. Cut the gorgonzola into small cubes/chunks. Roughly chop the walnut halves.
    5. Fry the shallots in hot oil until clear. Add garlic, Gorgonzola, and milk. Allow to simmer until all the cheese has melted, whilst constantly stirring.
    6. Stir in the walnuts and rocket and season with salt and pepper.
    7. Drain the maccaroni.
    8 Mix into the sauce and garnish with viola blossoms.


    I thought this might be a useful link, if somebody is just looking to translate one or two items in a recipe or any other text........


    http://dict.leo.org/?lang=en&lp=ende&search=


    Last edited by -Sylvie- on Sun Jan 23, 2005 5:34 am, edited 1 time in total
    Inge 1505
    Sun Jan 23, 2005 5:21 am
    Food.com Groupie
    EL is short for Esslöffel (tablespoon) and Knoblauchzehen means garlic cloves. BTW, I would consider this to be a recipe of italian origin, as I have many similar ones in my italian cookbooks. icon_smile.gif But whatever its heritage, it sounds delicious!
    HeatherFeather
    Sun Jan 23, 2005 8:26 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    The violets are optional and might be hard to find for some, so you might consider offering an additional suggestion for a colorful garnish. Perhaps a sprig of fresh rosemary or something.

    It sounds very good. If you share it, I will add it to my cookbook and hope to try it out sometime. icon_smile.gif
    ellieszoo
    Mon Jan 24, 2005 12:14 am
    Regular "Line Cook" Poster
    Hi.... Oh I have two or three or more lol... that I would love to figure out... some I can remember what they are but not the pronunciation... ok.. one was almost like a roll...it was a yeast roll... filled with jam... momma used apricot.. THEN.. there is a lintzesnitten.. not sure about the spelling....she used cranberries or sometimes cranberry sauce.. and in the baking sheet looked like lattice work... the pastry part I know has nuts.. and the potato dumplings that I mentioned on the introduction page... I wish I could spell it.. I know how she said it... ok is sounded like Hashanknoerdel.. are you guys laughing yet... but it is ground up meat.. ham.. beef.. etc. with onions and salt/pepper then boiled.. IF there were any leftovers... we would fry up with an egg...OH now I am hungry..lol...

    I also have some old cookbooks... one is handwritten.. my mom was born in 1920... so I am thinking.. that this one was started as a young girl.. I remember she use to make appfel strudel ... stretch the dough out on the table.. the whole table lol.. miss that ..

    I appreciate any help... or translations.. I tried a few sites.. to translate the recipes... didn't come out exactly right..lolo... apparently not the right translation site...

    Thanks a bunch Debra
    Tasty Tidbits
    Mon Jan 24, 2005 1:37 am
    Forum Host
    Thanks so much Sylvie. I have posted it! Are you game for another one?
    Tasty Tidbits
    Mon Jan 24, 2005 3:04 am
    Forum Host
    These look like really good muffins and I would love to give them a try:

    Olivenmuffins

    12 Stuck/ Zubereitung: 25 minuten/ Insgesamt: 50 minuten

    Warum diese Muffins so pupular sind: Sie schmecken nach Mittelmeer und machen auch noch satt.

    Zutaten:
    40g Pinienkerne
    75g entsteinte grune oliven
    50g getrocknete tomaten in ol
    2 Eier
    Salz
    5 EL Olivenol
    1/4 l buttermilch
    1/2 TL getrockneter Thymian
    250g Weizenvillkornmehl
    2 TL Backpulver
    1/2 TL Natron
    Fett fur die Formen

    1. Backofen auf 200 Grad vorheizen (Umluft 180 Grad, Gas Stufe 4).
    2. Pinienkerne in einer Pfanne ohne Fett helibraun rosten.
    3. Oliven der Lange nach vierteln. Tomaten abtropfen lassen, dabei das Ol auffangen. Die Tomaten klein schneiden.
    4. Die Eier trennan. EiweiB und 1 Prise Salz mit den Quirlen des Handruhrers steif schlagen.
    5. Eigelb mit dem Tomatenol, dem Olivenol und der Buttermilch verruhren.
    6. Pinienkerne, Oliven, Tomaten und Thymian unterruhren.
    7. Mehl, Backpulver und Natron mischen und unter die Eigelbmasse ruhren.
    8. Den eischnee unterheben.
    9. Den Teig in gefettete Muffinformen fullen und im Backofen etwa 25 minuten backen.
    10. Muffins vorsichtig aus den Formen Losen und auf einem Kuchengitter abkuhlen lassen.


    Thanks so much for all your help so far. I know these are olive muffins, but once again have no idea of what Eier is, or Backpulver or Natron.
    Anke R
    Mon Jan 24, 2005 3:38 am
    Food.com Groupie
    MarieAlice wrote:
    These look like really good muffins and I would love to give them a try:

    Olivenmuffins

    12 Stuck/ Zubereitung: 25 minuten/ Insgesamt: 50 minuten

    Warum diese Muffins so pupular sind: Sie schmecken nach Mittelmeer und machen auch noch satt.

    Zutaten:
    40g Pinienkerne / pine seeds
    75g entsteinte grune oliven / green seeded olives
    50g getrocknete tomaten in ol /sundried tomatoes in olive oil
    2 Eier/ eggs
    Salz/ salt
    5 EL Olivenol/ tbs olive oil
    1/4 l buttermilch/ buttermilk
    1/2 TL getrockneter Thymian/tsp dry thyme
    250g Weizenvillkornmehl/ wholewheatflour
    2 TL Backpulver/ tsp bakingpowder
    1/2 TL Natron/ tsp bakingsoda
    Fett fur die Formen/ fat for the tray

    1. Backofen auf 200 Grad vorheizen (Umluft 180 Grad, Gas Stufe 4)./ preheat oven to 200C (surround 180/ gas 4)
    2. Pinienkerne in einer Pfanne ohne Fett helibraun rosten./ roast pineseeds without fat in a pan
    3. Oliven der Lange nach vierteln. Tomaten abtropfen lassen, dabei das Ol auffangen. Die Tomaten klein schneiden./quarter olives; drain tomatoes and keep the oil; chop tomatoes
    4. Die Eier trennan. EiweiB und 1 Prise Salz mit den Quirlen des Handruhrers steif schlagen./ seperate eggs; beat whites with salt until stiffened
    5. Eigelb mit dem Tomatenol, dem Olivenol und der Buttermilch verruhren./ mix tomatooil with oliveoil and buttermilk
    6. Pinienkerne, Oliven, Tomaten und Thymian unterruhren./ add pineseeds, olives, tomatoes and thyme
    7. Mehl, Backpulver und Natron mischen und unter die Eigelbmasse ruhren./ add flour, baking powder and soda to the egg mix
    8. Den eischnee unterheben. / add egg white gently
    9. Den Teig in gefettete Muffinformen fullen und im Backofen etwa 25 minuten backen./ fill in muffin tray and bake for 25 min.
    10. Muffins vorsichtig aus den Formen Losen und auf einem Kuchengitter abkuhlen lassen./ take muffins out of the ftray and leave to cool


    Thanks so much for all your help so far. I know these are olive muffins, but once again have no idea of what Eier is, or Backpulver or Natron.


    I wrote the translation after the German. Hope it helps. Looks like you grabbed a book for Italianstyle cooking icon_biggrin.gif
    -Sylvie-
    Mon Jan 24, 2005 5:15 am
    Food.com Groupie
    ellieszoo wrote:
    Hi.... Oh I have two or three or more lol... that I would love to figure out... some I can remember what they are but not the pronunciation... ok.. one was almost like a roll...it was a yeast roll... filled with jam... momma used apricot.. THEN.. there is a lintzesnitten.. not sure about the spelling....she used cranberries or sometimes cranberry sauce.. and in the baking sheet looked like lattice work... the pastry part I know has nuts.. and the potato dumplings that I mentioned on the introduction page... I wish I could spell it.. I know how she said it... ok is sounded like Hashanknoerdel.. are you guys laughing yet... but it is ground up meat.. ham.. beef.. etc. with onions and salt/pepper then boiled.. IF there were any leftovers... we would fry up with an egg...OH now I am hungry..lol...

    I also have some old cookbooks... one is handwritten.. my mom was born in 1920... so I am thinking.. that this one was started as a young girl.. I remember she use to make appfel strudel ... stretch the dough out on the table.. the whole table lol.. miss that ..

    I appreciate any help... or translations.. I tried a few sites.. to translate the recipes... didn't come out exactly right..lolo... apparently not the right translation site...

    Thanks a bunch Debra


    The first one you mention sounds like what is called a 'Berliner', the second one like Linzer Schnitten and the last some form of Kartoffel Knoedel, maybe Speck-Knoedel!

    I'vw got some lectures to prepare right now, but when I've got a little time, hopefully later on I'll have alook for some recipes. Or maybe somebody else has got one handy! icon_wink.gif
    Barbara in Holland
    Fri Jan 28, 2005 3:00 am
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    Hi...I was in Baden-Baden a couple of years ago at Christmas and had a delicious potato/noodle/sauerkraut dish at one of the stalls. Everyone I ask said it was a German dish from the area. Does anyone have any idea of what it was, and how to cook it. It was delicious! Thanks
    Inge 1505
    Sat Jan 29, 2005 2:26 am
    Food.com Groupie
    BarbaraM wrote:
    Hi...I was in Baden-Baden a couple of years ago at Christmas and had a delicious potato/noodle/sauerkraut dish at one of the stalls. Everyone I ask said it was a German dish from the area. Does anyone have any idea of what it was, and how to cook it.

    Hello BarbM,
    Not out of hand. Could you describe it a little closer? Potato chunks or mashed, noodles long or filled with potatoes, sauerkraut as a side or mixed in? How was it presented? icon_smile.gif
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