Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Great Britain and Ireland / British Measurements & Cooking Terms
    Lost? Site Map

    British Measurements & Cooking Terms

    Go to page << Previous Page  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
    Wheres_the_Beef?
    Wed Sep 28, 2011 1:18 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    British - American Cooking Terms

    BRITISH TERM = AMERICAN TERM

    afters = dessert
    Aubergine = Eggplant
    bacon = Canadian bacon or ham
    Baking tray = Cookie sheet
    bangers = sausages
    Baps, A "bap" = a whole hamburger bun (both top and bottom)
    Beetroot = Beets
    Bicarbonate of soda = Baking soda
    Biscuits = Cookies
    bitter = beer
    Bilberry = Blueberry
    Biscuit mixture = Cookie dough
    Black cherries = Bing cherries
    Boiled sweets = Hard candy
    brew = cup of tea
    Broad Beans = Fava beans
    brown sauce = Steak sauce
    Bun = Cupcake
    Bun Tin = Cupcake pan
    candy floss = cotton candy
    Capsicum = Bell peppers
    Carolina rice = Short grain rice
    Castor sugar = Superfine granulated sugar, or sugar blended twice
    Chicken cube, beef cube = Bouillon cube
    Chicory = Belgian endive
    chipolata = small sausage, Cocktail sausages
    chips = French fries
    chocolate drops = chocolate chips
    Chocolate strands, Chocolate vermicelli = Chocolate sprinkles
    Cling film = Plastic wrap
    Collops = Meatballs
    Cooking thermometer = Candy thermometer
    Cornflour = Cornstarch
    Cos lettuce = Romaine lettuce
    Courgette = Zucchini
    crisps = potato chips
    Crumpet = Similar to an English muffin
    Crystallised fruits = Candied fruits
    cuppa = cup of tea
    Curly endive = Chicory
    dark cooking chocolate = semi-sweet chocolate
    Demerara sugar = Light brown sugar
    Dessicated coconut = Flaked coconut
    Digestive biscuits = Graham crackers
    Double cream = Heavy cream or whipping cream
    English round lettuce = Bibb lettuce
    Essence = Extract
    fairy cake = cupcake (Australian English: patty cake or cup cake)
    Fish Fingers = fish sticks
    fizzy drink = carbonated drinks
    Forcemeat = Stuffing mixture
    French beans = Green beans
    Gammon = Ham
    Ginger nut = Ginger snap
    Girdle = Griddle
    gobstopper = jawbreaker
    golden caster sugar = unrefined caster sugar (slightly golden hue due to a bit of molasses used in processing)
    Golden syrup = Light Karo Syrup
    Greaseproof paper = Waxed paper, Wax paper
    Ground nut = Peanut
    Ground nut oil = Peanut oil
    Haricot beans = Navy beans
    ice lolly = popsicle
    Icing sugar or 10 k sugar = Confectioners' sugar or powdered sugar
    Italian 00 flour = pasta flour
    Jam = Jelly
    Jelly = Jell-O, gelatin
    jacket potato = baked potato
    kippers = smoked herring
    Knob of butter = Pat of butter
    Lean bacon = Canadian bacon
    Liver sausage = Liverwurst
    Lyle's Golden Syrup = Light Karo Syrup
    Mangetout = snow/sugar peas
    Marrow = Large zucchini
    mash = mashed potatoes
    Mince = Ground beef
    Minced meat = Ground meat
    Mixed spice = Pumpkin pie spice
    Morello cherries = sour cherries
    Muscovado sugar = Raw, unrefined sugar
    muesli = granola
    Orange pepper = Bell pepper
    Patna rice = Long grain rice
    Pastry case = Pie shell
    Pawpaw = Papaya
    Pig’s trotter = Pig’s foot
    pips = seeds
    Plain flour = All-purpose flour
    Polony = Bologna sausage
    Porridge = Oatmeal, cooked
    Prawns = Shrimp
    Pudding cloth = Cheesecloth
    Rasher of Bacon, Rashers = Slices of Canadian bacon or ham
    Rasher = Slice
    Red pepper = Bell pepper
    rocket = arugula
    scone = Baking powder biscuit, sweet or savory
    Semolina = Cream of wheat
    Sieve = Sift
    Single cream = Light cream, half and half
    Soft brown sugar = Brown sugar
    Spring onions = Green onions
    SR Flour = Self Raising Flour
    Stoned = Seeded
    Streaky bacon = Bacon
    Strong flour = Bread flour
    Sultanas = seedless white raisins, golden raisins
    Swede = Rutabaga, turnip
    Sweetcorn = Corn
    Sweet pepper = Pimiento
    Sweets = Candy
    Swiss roll = Jelly roll
    Tin = Can
    Tinned = Canned
    Treacle = Molasses
    Toffee = Taffy
    tomato puree = tomato paste
    tomato sauce = tomato ketchup
    Vegetable fat = Crisco
    Vegetable marrow = Yellow squash
    Water biscuits = Crackers, matzos
    Wholemeal flour = Whole wheat flour
    Yellow pepper = Bell pepper
    Rachel Savage
    Wed Sep 12, 2012 12:15 pm
    Regular "Line Cook" Poster
    I would take issue with some of this:

    Wheres_the_Beef? wrote:
    British - American Cooking Terms

    BRITISH TERM = AMERICAN TERM

    bitter = beer


    As noted above, the American "beer" includes the British lager and ale (including bitter)

    Quote:
    Bilberry = Blueberry


    My experience is that the British call American blueberries "blueberries".

    Quote:
    brown sauce = Steak sauce


    Brown sauce can probably be substituted for steak sauce, but the taste is different -- less smoky and more sweet.

    Quote:
    Bun = Cupcake


    Cupcakes are one type of bun, but "bun" can also refer to what Americans would call buns or other types of pastries.

    Quote:
    chocolate drops = chocolate chips


    Chocolate drops are bigger than American chocolate chips. American-style chocolate chips, called "chocolate chips" are readily available in the UK, just in much smaller packages than in the US (around 4 oz rather than 12-16).

    Quote:
    Digestive biscuits = Graham crackers


    Again, more of a substitution than an exact equivalence. Digestives are thicker (and round!)

    Quote:
    Greaseproof paper = Waxed paper, Wax paper


    Also a substitution, and an inadequate one at that. Waxed paper is covered in wax. Greaseproof paper is not, which gives it different properties. I find baking parchment to be a better substitute as it is less likely to stick than greaseproof paper (unless you grease and flour the greaseproof paper, as called for in many British recipes)

    Quote:
    Toffee = Taffy


    Not even close. I think Americans call toffee "toffee". Taffy is not available in the UK and there is no British word for it.

    Quote:
    Water biscuits = Crackers, matzos


    Matzo/matzah is available in the UK by that name. I would translate the American "cracker" as "savoury biscuit"
    Recas1992
    Wed Mar 19, 2014 6:55 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Wow, it's an amazing stats about measurements in Cooking. It would help us a lot in synchronization and recipe perfection. Thanks
    Go to page << Previous Page  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 Stop sending e-mails when someone replies
    Add this to My Favorite Topics
    Alert us of inappropriate posts

    Free Weekly Newsletter

    Get the latest recipes and tips delivered right to your inbox.

    Your e-mail is safe. Privacy Policy
    Advertisement

    Ideas from Food.com

    Powered by phpBB 2.0.1 © 2002 phpBB Group

    Over 475,000 Recipes

    Food.com Network of Sites