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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Great Britain and Ireland / British Measurements & Cooking Terms
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    British Measurements & Cooking Terms

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    Tasty Tidbits
    Wed Jan 23, 2008 2:26 pm
    Forum Host
    Rubbing in butter: Cut the butter into small pieces and put it into the bowl with the flour, giving it a bit of a stir to coat all the butter with flour. Taking the tips of your two fingers next to your thumb and your thumb, rub the butter into the flour by lifting it up with the flour and gently rubbing it, dropping it back into the bowl and then repeating and repeating the movement until the mixture closely resembles coarse or fine crumbs, depending on what the recipe calls for. Hope this helps. icon_biggrin.gif
    swimlex456
    Thu Jan 24, 2008 7:50 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    thank you, it did help a lot
    mmefont
    Wed Feb 06, 2008 7:03 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Can anyone tell me the British equivalent of cornmeal? Is it different to corn starch? or corn flour? Oh, and in the UK we have bicarbonate of soda and baking powder - which of those is baking soda?

    Thanks

    Kez
    Summerwine
    Wed Feb 06, 2008 9:36 am
    Food.com Groupie
    mmefont wrote:
    Can anyone tell me the British equivalent of cornmeal? Is it different to corn starch? or corn flour? Oh, and in the UK we have bicarbonate of soda and baking powder - which of those is baking soda?

    Thanks

    Kez


    Hi,
    I am originally from the states and over there corn starch is what the UK call corn flour but they are the same thing; frequently used as a thickening agent.

    Bicarbonate of soda is the same thing as baking soda.
    Baking Powder is still called baking powder.

    I have just bought 'fine' cornmeal (fine polenta) recently which looks like yellow flour. On the bag is reads "also known as maize flour and polenta, corn meal is high in protein and low in fat. It is widely used in Mexican and Creole cuisine. Perfect for making Italian polenta, American corn bread and Punjabi corn rotis."

    Polenta is more coarse and this is what it reads on www.foodsubs.com:

    "polenta meal Substitutes: yellow cornmeal (coarsely ground) OR ready-made polenta (saves time) OR hominy grits OR millet

    cornmeal = mealie meal Equivalents: One pound = 3 1/4 cups Notes: Cornmeal comes in different colors: white, yellow, and blue. Yellow cornmeal has more beta carotene than the others, while blue cornmeal has more protein and turns baked goods purple. Larger supermarkets also carry stone-ground cornmeal = water-ground cornmeal, which is more tasty and nutritious than regular cornmeal, but doesn't keep as long. See also self-rising cornmeal. Substitutes: polenta OR corn flour (gives baked goods a lighter texture) OR (if using cornmeal for breading) crush corn chips in a blender until they have the consistency of cornmeal. "

    I hope this helps.
    mmefont
    Thu Feb 07, 2008 3:16 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Thanks, it helps a lot, I wanted to make a corn bread recipe but had no idea how!
    hot coco
    Sat Mar 29, 2008 7:33 pm
    Experienced "Head Chef" Poster
    Thank you very much for posting that wonderful list of cooking terms. It was quite comprehensive, but I still have a couple of questions. I just got a cookbook that was published in the UK and there are a couple of things I want to clarify.
    What do these terms mean: rosti, rissole, natural yogurt, flageolet beans, runner beans and roasties?
    TIA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! There are quite a few things that I want to try'
    Tasty Tidbits
    Mon Mar 31, 2008 3:03 am
    Forum Host
    hot coco wrote:
    Thank you very much for posting that wonderful list of cooking terms. It was quite comprehensive, but I still have a couple of questions. I just got a cookbook that was published in the UK and there are a couple of things I want to clarify.
    What do these terms mean: rosti, rissole, natural yogurt, flageolet beans, runner beans and roasties?
    TIA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! There are quite a few things that I want to try'


    Rosti is like a potato cake, usually made with grated potatoes and fried. Rissole is type of a meat ball. Natural yoghurt is plain, unflavoured yoghurt ie, in it's natural state. Flageolet beans are a large white bean. Runner beans are long green beans, quite flat and about a foot long or so. The younger ones are better as they get a bit stringy as they get older. We usually shred them and then steam them to eat and roasties are quite simply delicious crispy potatoes that have been par boiled then rolled in fat and roasted in the oven until golden brown and crispy!
    Scotland
    Sun Mar 08, 2009 5:31 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    I wish I'd known about this forum a few weeks ago. I was born and raised in Scotland and moved to the States 9 years ago when I was 25. I was only coming for 6 months!

    I was making my Mum's (red) lentil soup and couldn't find Swedes anywhere. Now, if I'd just known they were called rutabagas here, it would have been half the battle!

    I'll try and think of anything else I can for your list.
    Scotland
    Sun Mar 08, 2009 7:11 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    stock cube – bouillon cube
    jam – jelly
    sausage meat – unseasoned pork sausage without casings, use country style
    green chillies – jalapenos
    tomato puree – tomato paste
    plum tomatoes – roma tomatoes
    butter beans – lima beans
    crθme fraiche – like sour cream
    soured cream – has the consistency of half n’ half
    sugar snaps – snap peas
    gherkins – dill pickles
    stock – broth
    muffins – generally English muffins, although there are “American” muffins available too
    apple crumble – similar to apple cobbler
    cider – alcoholic apple beverage
    Milk:
    whole – 7.1% fat
    semi-skimmed – 3.6% fat
    skimmed – 0.6% fat
    J. Ko
    Mon Mar 09, 2009 12:25 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Scotland wrote:
    stock cube – bouillon cube
    jam – jelly
    sausage meat – unseasoned pork sausage without casings, use country style
    green chillies – jalapenos
    tomato puree – tomato paste
    plum tomatoes – roma tomatoes
    butter beans – lima beans
    crθme fraiche – like sour cream
    soured cream – has the consistency of half n’ half
    sugar snaps – snap peas
    gherkins – dill pickles
    stock – broth
    muffins – generally English muffins, although there are “American” muffins available too
    apple crumble – similar to apple cobbler
    cider – alcoholic apple beverage
    Milk:
    whole – 7.1% fat
    semi-skimmed – 3.6% fat
    skimmed – 0.6% fat

    gherkin pickles are not dill pickles. Gherkins are a sweet pickle and have no garlic or dill. Dill pickles are sour and have dill and, frequently, garlic. Granted, I am from Canada and our terminology is not the same as in the U.S.
    -Sylvie-
    Mon Mar 09, 2009 12:58 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Scotland, thanks for adding to the list. That's brilliant.
    icon_biggrin.gif
    Scotland
    Mon Mar 09, 2009 5:57 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    I found this on wikipedia:

    "The Gherkin (French cornichon) is a small cucumber type vegetable, usually of the same species as the cucumber (Cucumis sativus), but of a different race. They are usually picked when 3 to 8 cm (1 to 3 in) in length and pickled in jars or cans with vinegar (often flavoured with herbs, particularly dill; hence, ‘dill pickle’) or brine to become a pickled cucumber.

    The term can also be used to refer to the West Indian Burr Gherkin (Cucumis anguria), a related plant species, originally West African, that was introduced to the West Indies, probably by the Portuguese. This ‘true’ or Burr Gherkin or badunga cannot interbreed with the ‘true’ cucumber (Cucumis sativus), which is the condiment vegetable now generally known as the gherkin or dill pickle."

    Hope it helps.
    JoyfulCook
    Mon Mar 16, 2009 6:10 pm
    Forum Host
    Scotland, if you go to page 1 of this thread, there is a long long list of what things are called in the UK and other countries, it should be of some help
    kazathena
    Fri Feb 19, 2010 11:26 am
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster

    The UK term "Rub in " in a method means to, for example, for pastry, use your fingers to work the flour marg/butter/shortening between your fingers till it resembles a breadcrumb texture.
    JoyfulCook
    Mon Feb 22, 2010 12:16 pm
    Forum Host
    thats right!
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