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    You are in: Home / Community Forums / Great Britain and Ireland / British Measurements & Cooking Terms
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    British Measurements & Cooking Terms

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    French Tart
    Thu Dec 28, 2006 4:33 am
    Forum Host
    wizkid wrote:
    Its a pleasure to help. I must admit, until I started using recipezaar I didn't know how different our two languages are!

    icon_smile.gif


    Snap - Bully Beef is a WW2 expression that my grandparents might have used......what is interesting is that someone still obviously uses it for you to have heard it!!!!
    Great job you have done however, must have taken you ages - I'll have a closer read!
    icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif FT
    da_gforce
    Tue Jan 02, 2007 5:30 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    OMG! You are my hero...This is the best guide, and has answered nearly all of my confusions about american terms, I know I will be using it as a constant reference! Thanks again! icon_smile.gif
    C.C
    Tue Jan 09, 2007 5:17 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Thanks for this list. I am english and living in the US and I send back recipes to my family, the confusion is now at an end. thankyou
    J. Ko
    Sat Mar 17, 2007 6:20 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I just wanted to add my two cents worth regarding the vegetable shortening (Trex, White Flora, Crisco depending which side of the pond you're on). I'm sure you've heard of hydrogenated oils a.k.a. "trans-fats". Vegetable oil, in it's natural state, is a liquid. Shortening is vegetable oil which has been chemically altered (ie: extra hydrogen atoms added - hence the term "hydrogenated") to make a solid. These trans fats wreak havoc in our bodies and have been linked to numerous medical conditions; especially heart conditions and high cholesterol levels. They are worse for you than the extra cholesterol and higher saturated fat content in butter.

    I hope I don't sound like I'm preaching, but in the interest my health, and the health of my family, I stay away from margarines and shortenings. There's something very unnatural about products which can sit, unrefrigerated, for months on end and not go bad, go stale, go rancid, or attract bacterial growth.
    chia
    Fri Apr 20, 2007 2:43 pm
    Forum Host
    i'm so glad this thread is still here- i guessed on the recipe i made earlier by tulip fairy, but i just checked and my memory was intact icon_smile.gif treacle and the oven temp conversion to farenheit was right.
    HappyBunny
    Fri Apr 20, 2007 4:22 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    chia wrote:
    i'm so glad this thread is still here- i guessed on the recipe i made earlier by tulip fairy, but i just checked and my memory was intact icon_smile.gif treacle and the oven temp conversion to farenheit was right.

    Yes, it's one of the most helpful ones on the site. I can't tell you the amount of times I've referred to it.
    chia
    Fri Apr 20, 2007 7:08 pm
    Forum Host
    i agree- after being in london i am embarassed to say we've been doing dinner and a movie every night, and all british themed, makes me feel closer to dd and keep experiencing our family vacation.
    i guessed at 350f, but i knew after this site that treacle was what we call molasses icon_smile.gif
    Molly53
    Tue Nov 06, 2007 9:27 pm
    Forum Host
    Measurements (British, metric and US)

    1 ounce flour = 25g = quarter cup
    4 ounces flour = 125g = One cup
    8 ounces flour = 250g = Two cups
    2 ounces breadcrumbs (fresh) = 60g = One cup
    4 ounces breadcrumbs (dry) = 125g = One cup
    4 ounces oatmeal = 125g = One cup (scant)
    5 ounces currants = 150g = One cup
    4 ounces shredded suet = 125g = One cup (scant)
    4 ounces butter and other fats, including cheese = 125g = One stick
    8 ounces butter and other fats, including grated cheese = 250g = One cup
    7 ounces caster/granulated sugar = 200g = One cup
    8 ounces caster/granulated sugar = 250g = One and a quarter cups
    8 ounces meat (chopped/minced/ground) = 250g = One cup
    8 ounces cooked, mashed potatoes = 250g = One cup
    One ounce (1oz) = One rounded tablespoon
    One tablespoon of liquid = 3 teaspoons
    One teaspoon liquid = 5ml
    One British teaspoon is the same as an American teaspoon
    One British tablespoon liquid = 17.7ml
    One US tablespoon liquid =14.2ml
    8 tablespoons = 4 fluid ounces = 125ml = Half cup
    8 fluid ounces = 250ml = One cup (Half a US pint)
    Half pint/10 fluid ounces = 300ml = One and a quarter cups (scant)
    Three quarters of a pint/15 fluid ounces = 450 ml =Two cups (scant) or one US pint
    One British pint/20 fluid ounces = 600ml = Two and a half cups
    Ingredients

    Bacon rashers = Bacon slices
    Bannock = Flat round cake
    Bicarbonate of soda = Baking soda
    Biscuits = Crackers/cookies
    Boiling fowl = Stewing fowl
    Broad beans = Lima beans
    Cake mixture = Cake batter
    Castor sugar = Granulated sugar
    Celery stick = Celery stalk
    Chipolata sausages = Cocktail sausages
    Cornflour = Cornstarch
    Chips = French fried potatoes
    Creamed potatoes = Mashed potatoes
    Crisps = Potato chips
    Demerara sugar = Light brown sugar
    Dessicated coconut = Flaked coconut
    Digestive biscuits = Graham crackers
    Double cream = Whipping cream
    Essence = Extract
    Farls = Quarters
    Fats = Shortening
    Flaked almonds = Slivered almonds
    Frosting sugar = Powdered sugar
    Glac = Candied
    Golden syrup = Light corn syrup
    Hough = Shank of beef
    Icing = Frosting
    Jam = Preserves
    Mince/minced beef = Ground beef
    Mixed spices = Allspice
    Nut of butter = Pat of butter
    Pinhead oatmeal = Irish oatmeal
    Rasher = Slice
    Ratafia biscuits = Almond flavoured cookies/dried macaroons
    Roast Potatoes = Oven browned potatoes
    Salt beef = Corned beef brisket
    Scone = Shortcake, biscuit
    Self raising flour = All-purpose flour with baking powder
    Single cream = Light cream
    Soft brown sugar = Light brown sugar
    Spring onion = Scallion/green onion
    Stewing steak = Braising beef
    Stoned raisins = Seedless raisins
    Strong plain flour = Unbleached white flour
    Sultanas = Seedless white raisins
    Treacle = Molasses
    Unsalted butter = Sweet butter
    Wholemeal = Wholewheat
    Utensils and Methods

    Ashet = Meat dish
    Baking sheet or tray = Cookie sheet
    Case = pie shell
    Fry = Pan Fry (with fat)
    Frying pan = Skillet
    Girdle = Griddle
    Grate = Shred
    Greaseproof paper = Vegetable parchment or waxed paper
    Grill = Broil
    Gut = Clean
    Jelly bag = Layers of cheesecloth
    Knead = Punch down
    Knock Back = Punch down
    Large pot = Dutch oven or a deep cooking utensil with a tight fitting lid
    Liquidizer = Electric blender
    Mince = Grind
    Polythene = Plastic wrap
    Prove = Rise
    Pudding cloth = Cheesecloth
    Roasting tin = Roasting pan with rack
    Sandwich tins = Round-layer pans
    Sieve = Sift
    Stewpan or pan = Kettle
    Tartlet tin = Muffin pan
    Vegetable mill = Food mill
    Whisk = Beat/whip
    Oven Temperatures

    Gas Mark 1 = 275F = 140C
    Gas Mark 2 = 300F = 150C
    Gas Mark 3 = 325F = 170C
    Gas Mark 4 = 355F = 180C
    Gas Mark 5 = 375F = 190C
    Gas Mark 6 = 400F = 200C
    Gas Mark 7 = 425F = 220C
    Gas Mark 8 = 455F = 230C
    PrimQuilter
    Fri Nov 16, 2007 6:19 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    I am trying to convert grams to US measures. I hope somebody can help me with this! I have tried to convert using the zaar link below and also metric versions on the web. I still come up with the same thing icon_rolleyes.gif These are for spices.
    When I convert 5g,3g,2g, I keep getting 1/8 oz. for all of them. Have checked GoodFood mags trying to find something that would give me something other than ounces. Can they be converted to Teaspoons & Tablespoons ? Are they just pinches ? It's making me crazy. Please help.

    UPDATE I have found old posts in this forum which have helped me get close to what I need. Thanks!
    Aileen&shadow
    Sun Dec 02, 2007 4:13 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    Thanks for all your work, it is going to help me so much.

    I was born and raised in Scotland, came to Canada when I was still a child. My Mum just gave me some really old cookbooks that my Grandma used during her lessons at school and a cookbook she had bought for "2 shillings" in sterling. It has some really old fashioned recipes (back to the basics), Tablet and Treacle Toffee were one of my favorites. So thanks again I will be using your conversion table quite a lot, the only one I could not find is PINT. How much is a Pint?? Also do you know what suet is?

    take care
    Aileen

    icon_razz.gif
    HappyBunny
    Sun Dec 02, 2007 4:38 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Aileen&shadow wrote:
    Thanks for all your work, it is going to help me so much.

    I was born and raised in Scotland, came to Canada when I was still a child. My Mum just gave me some really old cookbooks that my Grandma used during her lessons at school and a cookbook she had bought for "2 shillings" in sterling. It has some really old fashioned recipes (back to the basics), Tablet and Treacle Toffee were one of my favorites. So thanks again I will be using your conversion table quite a lot, the only one I could not find is PINT. How much is a Pint?? Also do you know what suet is?

    take care
    Aileen

    icon_razz.gif


    1 pt (UK) = 19.2151 fl.oz. (US)

    Suet (/ˈsuː.ɪt/) is raw beef or mutton fat, especially the hard fat found around the loins and kidneys. The melting point of suet is approximately 21C (70F)[1]. It consists mostly of saturated fat.
    French Tart
    Sun Dec 23, 2007 8:03 am
    Forum Host
    HappyBunny wrote:
    Aileen&shadow wrote:
    Thanks for all your work, it is going to help me so much.

    I was born and raised in Scotland, came to Canada when I was still a child. My Mum just gave me some really old cookbooks that my Grandma used during her lessons at school and a cookbook she had bought for "2 shillings" in sterling. It has some really old fashioned recipes (back to the basics), Tablet and Treacle Toffee were one of my favorites. So thanks again I will be using your conversion table quite a lot, the only one I could not find is PINT. How much is a Pint?? Also do you know what suet is?

    take care
    Aileen

    icon_razz.gif


    1 pt (UK) = 19.2151 fl.oz. (US)

    Suet (/ˈsuː.ɪt/) is raw beef or mutton fat, especially the hard fat found around the loins and kidneys. The melting point of suet is approximately 21C (70F)[1]. It consists mostly of saturated fat.


    You can also get vegetarian suet now as well - it is widely available in all British supermarkets! And, lower fat suet!
    FT icon_biggrin.gif
    auzzi
    Thu Jan 10, 2008 3:43 am
    Food.com Groupie
    PrimQuilter -

    Like most things: volume measurements do not easily translate into mass measurements, neither does UK Imperial into US Imperial or Metric [which one] into Imperial [which one] ?

    BUT

    One US Spice Company's measurements ..

    Volume To Weight Conversion Table
    http://www.tones.com/spiceInsights.html
    [The Volume To Weight Conversion Table shows how many teaspoons of a dried herb or spice make up an ounce.]

    Purely subjective - you will learn to work out the amounts of spice, according to your taste, as you go along ..
    -------
    Sat Jan 19, 2008 9:22 pm
    Food.com Groupie
    Thanks for all those conversions, they REALLY help!!!!!!!! icon_biggrin.gif icon_cool.gif
    swimlex456
    Wed Jan 23, 2008 12:18 pm
    Newbie "Fry Cook" Poster
    what exactly does it mean to "rub in butter", like when you're adding it to dry ingredients?
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